Article citationsMore >>

Ellis R, Ellis C. Dog and Cat Bites. Am Fam Physician. 2014 Aug 15; 90(4): 239-243.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

A Unique of Rhizobium radiobacter Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter-related Peritonitis from a Cat Bite

1Drexel University College of Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease and HIV Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia PA 19102

2Drexel University College of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia PA 19102

3Division of Clinical Microbiology, Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia PA 19102


American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 6, 103-105
DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-6-6-1
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Benjamin Bluen, Lukasz Kiljanek, Larry Krevolin, Kyle Krevolin, Hans P. Schlecht. A Unique of Rhizobium radiobacter Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter-related Peritonitis from a Cat Bite. American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2018; 6(6):103-105. doi: 10.12691/ajmcr-6-6-1.

Correspondence to: Benjamin  Bluen, Drexel University College of Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease and HIV Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia PA 19102. Email: bbluen@gmail.com

Abstract

Peritoneal dialysis catheter-related peritonitis is typically related to catheter insertion or hygiene. Organisms usually manifest as gram positive organisms typically Staphylococci or gram negative bacilli that typically colonize aqueous environments such as Pseudomonas spp. as well as other unusual mycobacterial or fungal pathogens. The authors present a unique case of peritoneal dialysis catheter-related peritonitis manifesting after the patient’s cat bit the proximal aspect of the catheter attachment tubing. After failure to clinically improve after outpatient treatment of Staphylococcus hemolyticus and Staphylococcus capitis catheter related-peritonitis with intraperitoneal Vancomycin and empiric Gentamicin, repeat peritoneal cultures were sent that demonstrated growth of Rhizobium radiobacter. The patient was admitted inpatient and treatment was tailored to intraperitoneal Cefepime with clearance of peritoneal cultures and rapid improvement in peritoneal white blood cell count and the patient’s clinical condition. The patient was subsequently discharged on oral Ciprofloxacin with complete recovery and catheter salvage.

Keywords