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Article

Exercise Prescription: Practices of Healthcare Professionals in Hospital Setting, Kenya

1Department of Health Promotion and Sports Science, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology

2School of Medicine, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology


Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2018, Vol. 3 No. 1, 47-54
DOI: 10.12691/jpar-3-1-8
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Oloo Micky Olutende, Peter Wisiuba Bukhala, Bernard Wesonga. Exercise Prescription: Practices of Healthcare Professionals in Hospital Setting, Kenya. Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2018; 3(1):47-54. doi: 10.12691/jpar-3-1-8.

Correspondence to: Oloo  Micky Olutende, Department of Health Promotion and Sports Science, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology. Email: micky.oloo.mf@gmail.com

Abstract

Physical inactivity is a serious epidemic that affects one’s health and there’s evidence that exercise can improve quality of life and health. The healthcare setting has been recognized as an appropriate and promising venue for counseling and prescribing physical activity to increase activity index of the population. An exercise prescription from a healthcare professional will remind the patient that physical activity is part of their treatment plan and should be adhered to with the same diligence with which their medication is taken. However, limited research on the topic suggests that many healthcare professionals are not incorporating exercise into treatment, and many lack the confidence to do so. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current exercise prescription trends among practicing healthcare professionals in Kakamega County, Kenya. A cross-sectional study was carried out in public health facilities in Kakamega County. The target population was nurses, medical officers and clinical officers. Data was collected using self-administered questionnaires and a total of 280 healthcare professionals from 7 government hospitals in Kakamega county participated in the study. From these hospitals 221 healthcare professionals (medical officers=11,5%, nurses= 165,75% and clinical officers=71,32%) completed the questionnaire. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) reported that, they occasionally (n=75, 33.9%) referred patients to other professionals for fitness assessment or appraisal, they occasionally (n=78, 35.3%) provided patients with verbal directions for a physical activity program, they very rarely (n=73, 33%) provided patients with written directions for a physical activity program, they frequently (n=71 32.1%) counselled PA (verbal or written prescription) for purposes of preventing chronic disease, they occasionally (n=76, 34.4%) discussed about physical activity with their patients and 59 (26.7%) very rarely participated in exercise session at least three times a week. The independent between- group ANOVA yielded a non- statistically significantly effect, F (2, 218) = 1.132, p = .324, ƞp2= .01. Statistical power was not adequate and was equal to .248. Thus, the null hypothesis of no significant differences in knowledge of exercise prescription in health professionals at public health facilities in Kakamega was accepted. In conclusion these findings lend support for further training, increased incorporation, and further growth needed in healthcare professionals’ self-efficacy in the prescription of exercise.

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