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Cena K. deDear R.J. Thermal comfort and behavioural strategies in office buildings located in a hot-arid climate. Journal of Thermal Biology 2001, 26(4-5), pp. 409-14.

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Article

Indoor Environmental Quality in Air-conditioned Mosque Buildings in Kuwait

1Department of Civil Engineering, College of Technological Studies, Shuwaikh, Kuwait


American Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture. 2017, Vol. 5 No. 4, 167-173
DOI: 10.12691/ajcea-5-4-5
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Farraj F. Al-ajmi, Ali. S. Al-azmi, Fawaz A. Alrashidi. Indoor Environmental Quality in Air-conditioned Mosque Buildings in Kuwait. American Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture. 2017; 5(4):167-173. doi: 10.12691/ajcea-5-4-5.

Correspondence to: Fawaz  A. Alrashidi, Department of Civil Engineering, College of Technological Studies, Shuwaikh, Kuwait. Email: farraj2010@gmail.com

Abstract

In this study, the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of air-conditioned mosque buildings in an extremely dry desert climate is examined from the perspective of the occupants via two aspects: thermal comfort and indoor air quality. The study presents statistical data about the worshiper thermal comfort together with data describing the indoor air quality in Kuwaiti mosque buildings. With respect to the latter, the overall IEQ acceptance using two measurements, namely, physical measurements and subjective information collected via questionnaires, was used to evaluate 140 worshipers visiting six air-conditioned mosque buildings in the state of Kuwait. The operative temperature based on actual mean vote (AMV) and predicted mean vote (PMV) was identified using a linear regression analysis of the responses on the ASHRAE seven-point thermal sensation scale and was found to be 26.1°C in the summer season .The indoor air quality (IAQ) with respect to the carbon dioxide concentration levels was compared with the acceptable limits of international standards, i.e., the ASHRAE Standard 62.1 [1]. The proposed overall IEQ acceptance findings in the mosque buildings show CO2 concentrations between 730 and 1220 ppm. However, this is considered a slightly higher than the ideal CO2 concentrations, which may require increasing ventilation rates by opening windows and, doors or by mechanical ventilation.

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