Article citationsMore >>

T. Robinson, G. McMullan, R. Marchant, and P. Nigam, “Remediation of dyes in textile effluent: a critical review on current treatment technologies with a proposed alternative,” Bioresource Technology, vol. 77, no. 3, pp. 247-255, 2001.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Environmental Bioremediation of Dyes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ETL-1 Isolated from Final Effluent Treatment Plant of Ankleshwar

1Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Applied & Environmental Microbiology Lab, Enviro Technology Limited (CETP), Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013, Vol. 1 No. 4, 74-83
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-1-4-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Maulin P Shah, Kavita A Patel, Sunu S Nair, A M Darji. Environmental Bioremediation of Dyes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ETL-1 Isolated from Final Effluent Treatment Plant of Ankleshwar. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013; 1(4):74-83. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-1-4-3.

Correspondence to: Maulin P Shah, Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Applied & Environmental Microbiology Lab, Enviro Technology Limited (CETP), Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India. Email: shahmp@uniphos.com

Abstract

Economical and bio-friendly approaches are needed to remediate dye-contaminated wastewater from various industries. In this study, a novel bacterial strain capable of decolorizing triarylmethane dyes was isolated from a textile wastewater treatment plant in Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India. The bacterial isolate was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa ETL-1 and was shown to decolorize three triarylmethane dyes tested within 24 h with color removal in the range of 72% to 96%. Decolorization efficiency of the bacterium was a function of operational parameters (aeration, dye concentration, temperature, and pH) and the optimal operational conditions obtained for decolorization of the dyes were: pH 7-8, 35°C and culture agitation. Effective color removal within 24 h was obtained at a maximum dye concentration of 50 mg/l. Dye decolorization was monitored using a scanning uv/visible spectrophotometer which indicated that decolorization was due to the degradation of dyes into non-colored intermediates. Phytotoxicity studies carried out using Triticum aestivum, and Lens esculenta revealed the triarylmethane dyes exerted toxic effects on plant growth parameters monitored. However, significant reduction in toxicity was obtained with the decolorized dye metabolites thus, indicating the detoxification of the dyes following degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ETL-1.

Keywords