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Dabin, B, “General study of soil usage conditions in the Chad Trough”, ORSTOM, Paris, France, 1964.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Effect of Topographic Position and Seasons on the Micronutrient Levels in Soils and Grown Huckleberry (Solanum scabrum) in Bafut (North-West Cameroon)

1Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences, University of Dschang, P.O. Box 222, Dschang, Cameroon

2Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Maroua, P.O. Box 814, Maroua, Cameroon.

3Department of Biology, Higher Teacher Training College, Bambili, University of Bamenda, P.O. Box 39 Bambili, Cameroon.

4Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

5Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Dschang, P.O. Box 67, Dschang, Cameroon


World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2017, Vol. 5 No. 2, 73-87
DOI: 10.12691/wjar-5-2-3
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
P. Azinwi Tamfuh, D. Tsozué, M.A. Tita, A. Boukong, R. Ngnipa Tchinda, H. Ntangmo Tsafack, A.D. Mvondo Ze. Effect of Topographic Position and Seasons on the Micronutrient Levels in Soils and Grown Huckleberry (Solanum scabrum) in Bafut (North-West Cameroon). World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2017; 5(2):73-87. doi: 10.12691/wjar-5-2-3.

Correspondence to: D.  Tsozué, Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Maroua, P.O. Box 814, Maroua, Cameroon.. Email: tsozudsir@yahoo.f

Abstract

Although topography and climate are known to affect soils micronutrient mobility, some related aspects like micronutrient bioavailability to plants and implications to human intake are not fully understood. This paper aimed to study the effects of different topographic positions and seasons (dry or humid) on micronutrient levels in soils and Solanum scabrum. A randomized complete block design with four replications was adopted for each topographic position. Fieldwork was completed by a battery of soil and vegetable analyses. The main results revealed that soil micronutrient levels appeared as follows: Al>Fe>Mn>Zn>Cu for all positions and seasons. The soil micronutrient levels were lowest for the midslope in relation to its steeper gradient that affects downwards migration of matter. Zn and Cu were below the recommended range for agricultural soils, while Al was far above in relation to the strongly acidic pH. In S. scabrum, micronutrients appeared as Mn>Fe>Zn>Al> Cu. Globally, vegetable metals levels were higher in the dry season for all positions. Except Al, all metals were below permissible and toxicity levels in food, while only Fe, Mn and Zn where above recommended range for normal plant growth. Metal transfer factors, apart from midslope, were higher in the dry season. Only Mn and Zn for all positions and seasons as well as Zn at footslope, were above 1. Globally, micronutrient levels in soils and vegetables were higher in the dry seasons for all positions. Micronutrient intake rates were higher in the dry season for all positions but lowest in the midslope for all seasons. Except Fe and Zn in adults, metal levels were above the recommended daily dietary intake indicating excess micronutrients intake by the inhabitants. Overall, a combination of steep slope and humid season reduces soil micronutrient level, limit uptake by vegetables and hence reduce mean daily intake in humans.

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