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Hohepa M, Schofield G, Kolt GS, Scragg R, Garrett N. Pedometer-determined physical activity levels of adolescents: differences by age, sex, time of week, and transportation mode to school. Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 2008;5 (Suppl. 1):S140-52.

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Article

Planned Missing Design in a School-Based Physical Activity Intervention for Early Adolescence

1Department of Biostatistics, West Virginia University School of Public Health, Morgantown, WV, USA

2Department of Kinesiology, California State University Chico, Chico, CA, USA

3Department of Physical Education Teacher Education, West Virginia University College of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences, Morgantown, WV, USA


American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 4, 83-93
DOI: 10.12691/ajssm-4-4-1
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Christa L. Lilly, Luciana C. Braga, Emily Jones, Sean Bulger, Kibum Cho, Eloise Elliott. Planned Missing Design in a School-Based Physical Activity Intervention for Early Adolescence. American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2016; 4(4):83-93. doi: 10.12691/ajssm-4-4-1.

Correspondence to: Christa  L. Lilly, Department of Biostatistics, West Virginia University School of Public Health, Morgantown, WV, USA. Email: cllilly@hsc.wvu.edu

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present a longitudinal planned missing design used to conduct a physical activity intervention in public middle schools (6th – 8th grades) in a rural Appalachian county. Method: Program outcome measures were collected at 13 points, with 33% participant random selection, and complete measures of demographic and anthropometric variables. Results: Of the 4,621 randomly selected participants over the three-year span, missing after random selection was highest for pedometers (74.68%), but also high for PACER (44.47%) and 3DPAR (41.9%). No differences were found on demographic or anthropometric variables, suggesting missing completely at random (MCAR) data on the planned missing data. Participants with missing data after random selection were more likely to be older, male, and in the 8th grade, suggesting missing at random (MAR) data. Conclusions: Results suggest the use of the planned missing design allowed for the feasible evaluation of the intervention using modern missing data analysis to account for MCAR and MAR data.

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