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Vincent JL, Moreno R. Clinical review: scoring systems in the critically ill. Crit Care. 2010;14(207):1-9.

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Article

Procalcitonin, C-Reactive Protein and its Correlation with Severity Based on Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 (PELOD-2) Score in Pediatric Sepsis

1Department of Child Health, Hasan Sadikin General Hospital-Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia


American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 3, 64-67
DOI: 10.12691/ajeid-4-3-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Runtika Dewi, Dadang Hudaya Somasetia, Nelly Amalia Risan. Procalcitonin, C-Reactive Protein and its Correlation with Severity Based on Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 (PELOD-2) Score in Pediatric Sepsis. American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2016; 4(3):64-67. doi: 10.12691/ajeid-4-3-3.

Correspondence to: Runtika  Dewi, Department of Child Health, Hasan Sadikin General Hospital-Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia. Email: runtikad@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Periodic procalcitonin (PCT) and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) tests could monitor sepsis response to the therapy, severity, and outcome. Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction Score (PELOD)-2 is a scoring system for predicting organ dysfunction severity progressivity and outcome in critical ill children. The primary endpoint was the correlation of PCT and CRP levels with disease severity based on PELOD-2 score in sepsis children. Methodology and principal findings: A correlational analytical cross-sectional non-clinical trials on periodic measurements of 31 sepsis children was conducted from February to April 2016 in Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia. Eligible subjects were newly diagnosed sepsis (aged ≥1 month to 14 years old). PCT and CRP as well as PELOD-2 scores were assessed in all subjects at T1, T2, and T3. During the study period, 31 sepsis children met the inclusion criteria. In the septic shock group, a significant correlation was found between PCT and PELOD-2 at T3 (p<0,05), between CRP and PELOD-2 score at T3 (p<0,05), and also between PCT and CRP at T2 and T3 (p<0,05). In survivor and non survivor, there was a significant difference in PCT level at T2 and T3 as well as in PELOD-2 score at T1, T2, and T3 but with no significant difference in CRP level for the 3 measurement days. Conclusions: PCT and CRP levels correlate with disease severity based on PELOD-2 score in children with sepsis.

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