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ADENLE, D. (2006). Institutional Issues in Water Supply, sanitation and their role in the attainment of the MDGs in Nigeria. Paper delivered at the 1st National Water and Sanitation Forum, Abuja, 29th August – 1st September.

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Article

Community Participation in the Rural Water Supply Sector of Enugu State, Nigeria

1Department of Geography, Hydrology and Water Resources Unit, University of Nigeria, Nsukka


American Journal of Water Resources. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 3, 58-67
DOI: 10.12691/ajwr-4-3-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Obeta Michael Chukwuma. Community Participation in the Rural Water Supply Sector of Enugu State, Nigeria. American Journal of Water Resources. 2016; 4(3):58-67. doi: 10.12691/ajwr-4-3-2.

Correspondence to: Obeta  Michael Chukwuma, Department of Geography, Hydrology and Water Resources Unit, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Email: Michael@yahoo.com

Abstract

The community participation policy has long been associated with rural development. Rural development planners opine that for rural development projects to succeed the host community must take active part in the development and management of such projects. Enugu state government has implemented the community participation policy in her rural water supply sector since the late 1990s. This paper examines the level of community participation in the development and management of rural water supply schemes in the state. It describes the water schemes, the practices of and factors constraining effective community participation in the area. In addition, the paper suggests strategies that can enhance the implementation of the policy in order to improve service delivery in the area. The research is largely qualitative, using data obtained through focus group discussion (FGD), interviews, observations and from records in the states agencies responsible for public water supplies. The research team interacted with 300 individuals, drawn from 15 communities hosting the 15 water schemes used in the study. The data generated were analyzed through the use of descriptive and inferences statistical tools. The results of the study revealed that practices of community participation in the study area vary widely. Genuine participation in critical stages of water projects such as selection of technology is either limited or lacking. Participation of Village Water Committees (VWCs) in the management of rural water supply schemes is mostly ceremonial and contributes little to the sustainable functioning of the schemes. Strategies that may aid the implementation of the policy are suggested.

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