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Ogutu-Ohwayo, R., Hecky, R.E., Cohen, A.S., & Kaufman, L. (1997). Human impacts on the African great lakes. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 50(2), 117-131.

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Article

The Impact of Evolution and Socio-economics of Commercially Exploited Fish Stock: A Review on Rastrineobola argentea in Lake Victoria

1Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya


Journal of Food Security. 2015, Vol. 3 No. 3, 82-86
DOI: 10.12691/jfs-3-3-3
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kigano Shelmith Wangechi, Anne W. T. Muigai, Shellemiah Otieno Ouma. The Impact of Evolution and Socio-economics of Commercially Exploited Fish Stock: A Review on Rastrineobola argentea in Lake Victoria. Journal of Food Security. 2015; 3(3):82-86. doi: 10.12691/jfs-3-3-3.

Correspondence to: Kigano  Shelmith Wangechi, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya. Email: shewangechi@yahoo.com

Abstract

Fish in Kenya is an important source of food, especially of high quality protein. They provide a good source of income for communities that live around lakes and contributing not only to the social and economic development of these communities but to Kenya’s economy. Lake Victoria located in East Africa, is the largest tropical freshwater lake in the world and is currently a habitat to many fish species such as the Nile perch (Lates niloticus), Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and silver cyprinid known locally as Omena (Rastrineobola argentea). During the last two decades the fish population in Lake Victoria has changed significantly primarily due to anthropogenic activities such as introduction of alien species and overfishing. R. argentea is the most commercially exploited species of Lake Victoria. It is the main provider of protein for the communities living around the lake and it is also used as a feed, where it is incorporated into feedstock used by both the livestock and poultry farmers. Over the last few years it has become the major prey for L. niloticus, an exotic species in the Lake Victoria. This review aims to compile dispersed literature about R. argentea in Lake Victoria majoring on its life history changes, threats to existence, its socio-economic value and the dynamic issues facing the management of Lake Victoria fishery.

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