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“Seventh International Conference on Fertility Control in Wildlife”. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 44: 154 Pp. 2013.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

History of the Science of Wldlife Fertility Control: Reflections of a 25-Year International Conference Series

1PNC, Inc., Villanova, PA USA

2The Science and Conservation Center, Billings, MT USA


Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2015, Vol. 3 No. 1, 22-29
DOI: 10.12691/aees-3-1-5
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Priscilla Cohn, Jay F. Kirkpatrick. History of the Science of Wldlife Fertility Control: Reflections of a 25-Year International Conference Series. Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2015; 3(1):22-29. doi: 10.12691/aees-3-1-5.

Correspondence to: Jay  F. Kirkpatrick, The Science and Conservation Center, Billings, MT USA. Email: jkirkpatrick@montana.net

Abstract

The science of wildlife fertility control originated in the mid-twentieth century, out of a growing need for alternatives to lethal controls for selected wildlife populations, where traditional lethal controls were no longer legal, wise, safe or publicly acceptable. Until late in the century the science was uncoordinated and without significant funding or cooperation among investigators. A 25-year conference series brought scientists engaged in this endeavor together, from around the world and set the stage for more rapid development and research support. In rapid fashion, steroid related efforts gave way to contraceptive vaccines and gonadotropic-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists and by the turn of century actual successful management of certain species was well underway. This included wild horses, urban deer, captive zoo populations, and even African elephants. However, an unanticipated backlash from state and federal wildlife agencies, and some animal protection groups slowed progress, particularly in application of the science to free-ranging wildlife populations. Today the science has progressed to the point where actual management could alleviate many problems but the sociopolitical dimensions of this science have slowed progress and thrown up many non-scientific hurdles (state legislation in particular). This short history presents a classic case of a general public and political system that cannot keep pace with new scientific developments.

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