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Article

Disease Management Practice on Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in Ethiopia

1Samara University, School of Natural and Computational Sciences, Department of Applied Biology, Samara, Ethiopia


World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2015, Vol. 3 No. 1, 34-42
DOI: 10.12691/wjar-3-1-8
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ephrem Guchi. Disease Management Practice on Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in Ethiopia. World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2015; 3(1):34-42. doi: 10.12691/wjar-3-1-8.

Correspondence to: Ephrem  Guchi, Samara University, School of Natural and Computational Sciences, Department of Applied Biology, Samara, Ethiopia. Email: ephremg21@gmail.com

Abstract

Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the fourth major crop of the world after rice, wheat and maize. In Ethiopia, the yield per unit area of potato is very low compared to those of other countries. There are many factors that reduce the yield of the crop among which the diseases like late blight (Phytophthora infestans) and bacterial wilt (Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum) which play an important role. Management of these diseases is therefore very essential. In Ethiopia, however, much research has not been done for the management of bacterial wilt disease except identification of bacteria and screening of biological control agents and use of resistant varieties. Late blight of potato can be managed using the following management (control) strategies: use of biological control agents, use of resistant varieties, intercropping, use of certified disease-free seed, use of selective fungicides and cultural practices such as destruction of cull piles by freezing or deep burying, destruction of volunteer potato plants in nearby fields throughout the season, destruction (desiccate, disc or flail and desiccate) of infected plants to avoid spread, reduction of periods of leaf wetness and high humidity within the crop canopy by appropriately timing irrigation, application of a recommended fungicide spray program (the program should start prior to the arrival of the pathogen) and desiccation of vines prior to harvest.

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