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Currrent Issue: Volume 4, Number 1, 2016

Article

Testing the BRCS Structure through a Multigroup Analysis

1Coimbra Health School, Coimbra, Portugal

2Universidade Portucalense Infante D. Henrique, Oporto, Portugal


Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. 2016, 4(1), 15-18
doi: 10.12691/rpbs-4-1-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Pedro Belo, Ricardo Pocinho, Jose Rodrigues. Testing the BRCS Structure through a Multigroup Analysis. Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. 2016; 4(1):15-18. doi: 10.12691/rpbs-4-1-3.

Correspondence to: Pedro  Belo, Coimbra Health School, Coimbra, Portugal. Email: pedrobelo@estescoimbra.pt

Abstract

The BCRS is a measurement tool that measures resilience with satisfactory levels of reliability and validity. In this research, a sample of 314 participants (volunteers) was tested. The participants were divided into two groups: young and older adults. Results showed a Cronbach's alpha of the BRCS scale for both young and older adults of 0.67 and 0.76, respectively. The primary analyses performed to assess the psychometric characteristics of the scale showed good reliability of the Spanish translation for older adults and unsatisfactory for young people, with analogous Cronbach’s alpha values than the obtained by the original instrument.

Keywords

References

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Article

Stigma of Mental Illness and Attitudes Toward Psychological Help-seeking in Jordanian University Students

1Zarqa University, Faculty of Nursing, Zarqa, Jordan

2Irbid National University, Faculty of Nursing, Irbid, Jordan


Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. 2016, 4(1), 7-14
doi: 10.12691/rpbs-4-1-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ahmad Rayan, Amani Jaradat. Stigma of Mental Illness and Attitudes Toward Psychological Help-seeking in Jordanian University Students. Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. 2016; 4(1):7-14. doi: 10.12691/rpbs-4-1-2.

Correspondence to: Ahmad  Rayan, Zarqa University, Faculty of Nursing, Zarqa, Jordan. Email: Ahmed_rayan87@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background. Avoiding seeking professional help for psychological problems may have a devastating impact on the life of university students. Data about stigma toward mental illness and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help (ATSPPH) in Arab university students are rare. This study aims to examine the correlates of ATSPPH in Jordanian university students. Method. A cross-sectional correlational design was used for this study. Using an online survey, a sample of 519 Jordanian university students completed measures of demographic and clinical variables, stigma toward mental illness and ATSPPH. Stigma toward mental illness was tested as a correlate of ATSPPH using a series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses, controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Results. The results showed that Jordanian students have relatively less favorable ATSPPH than other study groups. Female gender, medically-related specialities, students with a previous history of receiving mental health counseling services and students who reported low scores on measures of stigma toward mental illness were more likely to have favorable ATSPPH. The stigma toward mental illness was the strongest correlate of ATSPPH in students and accounted for 13% additional variance above and beyond the 3% accounted for by all other independent variables. Conclusions. Combating stigma toward mental illness in Arab students is an important step toward promoting their ATSPPH. There is a crucial need to provide professional and culturally competent psychological care for this population in particular.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Effect of Predisposing Risk Factors of an Eating Disorder on Response Inhibition and Working Memory: An Event-Related Potentials Study

1Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK


Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. 2016, 4(1), 1-6
doi: 10.12691/rpbs-4-1-1
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Alison Osborne, Leigh M. Riby. The Effect of Predisposing Risk Factors of an Eating Disorder on Response Inhibition and Working Memory: An Event-Related Potentials Study. Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. 2016; 4(1):1-6. doi: 10.12691/rpbs-4-1-1.

Correspondence to: Leigh  M. Riby, Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. Email: leigh.riby@northumbria.ac.uk

Abstract

A novel investigation was undertaken to assess the effect of a predisposition to an eating disorder on P3a and P3b event-related potentials. Previous research has suggested the P3a and the P3b are reliable markers of inhibitory control and working memory updating, respectively. An opportunity sample of 12 female participants was obtained with mean age of 22.42 (SD = 2.61). Participants completed the Eating Disorder Inventory – 3 assessing their predisposition to an eating disorder along with scores on the included subscales. Response inhibition and working memory was measured using the 3 Stimulus Oddball Task. This task elicits a P3a component in response to novel infrequently presented stimuli and the P3b component in the response to expected infrequent stimuli. Findings showed no evidence of an interaction between an overall predisposition to an eating disorder and P3a and P3b activations. However, results ascertained a significant positive correlation between Body Dissatisfaction scores and the P3a amplitudes. Individuals with a high score on body dissatisfaction scale showed greater activation towards the frontal region than those with a low score during the executive component task, i.e. the greater the score the greater hyperactivity in the frontal area of the brain during response inhibition. With regards to the working memory component, no significant effects were found. Although head maps for body dissatisfaction scores and working memory illustrated that there was a wider spread of activation for the high body dissatisfaction group, rather than concentrated activations in the parietal region.The implications of such results in respect to compensatory activations, the inability to ignore and possible dopamine involvement are discussed.

Keywords

References

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