ISSN (Print): 2372-0115

ISSN (Online): 2372-0107

Currrent Issue: Volume 4, Number 4, 2016

Article

Poverty, Food Security Status and Coping Strategies of Marginal Farm Households in Some Selected Areas of Bangladesh

1Senior Scientific Officer, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, RARS, Jamalpur, Bangladesh

2Department of Agricultural Economics, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh


Journal of Food Security. 2016, 4(4), 86-94
doi: 10.12691/jfs-4-4-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M. Mohiuddin, M. S. Islam, M. T. Uddin. Poverty, Food Security Status and Coping Strategies of Marginal Farm Households in Some Selected Areas of Bangladesh. Journal of Food Security. 2016; 4(4):86-94. doi: 10.12691/jfs-4-4-2.

Correspondence to: M.  Mohiuddin, Senior Scientific Officer, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, RARS, Jamalpur, Bangladesh. Email: mohiuddin_bari@yahoo.com

Abstract

The present study was conducted in Bangladesh during the years 2012-13 to know the present status of poverty, food insecurity and coping strategies adopted by marginal farm households during food crisis. The study employed mainly farm level cross sectional data collected from 150 farm households taking 50 from each upazila of three districts of Bangladesh. Descriptive statistics such as cost-of-basic need method and direct calorie intake method were used to analyze the data. About 24% of the marginal farm households lie below the lower poverty line and about 37% lie below the upper poverty line. About 19% lie below the hardcore poverty line and about 35% lie below the absolute poverty line. The study observed that on an average, the rural households were more or less secured in relation to availability of food round the year. About 62% of the respondents identified landlessness as the prime cause of their food insecurity followed by lack of income generating activities and natural calamities, respectively. About 49% of farm households relied like on less expensive food for everyday as consumption coping strategy during food shortage where about 22% took less food and about 17% cut quantity of food per meal and reduce number of meals eaten in a day. Irrespective of location, about 53% reliant upon borrowing money for coping with food insecurity followed by sale of households assets (45%), reduce food cost (40%) and seeking help from relatives (36%). It is also recommended that creation of employment opportunities throughout the year, especially in the lean season, and government supports are suggested to tackle the food insecurity problems for the study areas.

Keywords

References

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Article

Understanding Climate Change Adaptation by Farmers in Crop Production in Nepal

1Agriculture and Forestry University, Nepal

2Conservation Ecology, Agriculture and Forestry University, Nepal

3MADE-Nepal, Chitwan, Nepal


Journal of Food Security. 2016, 4(4), 76-85
doi: 10.12691/jfs-4-4-1
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Madav Dhital, Hridesh Sharma, Minraj Bhandari. Understanding Climate Change Adaptation by Farmers in Crop Production in Nepal. Journal of Food Security. 2016; 4(4):76-85. doi: 10.12691/jfs-4-4-1.

Correspondence to: Madav  Dhital, Agriculture and Forestry University, Nepal. Email: madhav.dhital021@gmail.com

Abstract

This study was conducted in Jhapa (Terai), Sindhuli (Hill) and Kalikot (Mountain) districts of Nepal from February 2015 to end of April 2016, to assess the understanding of climate change adaptation by the farmers in crop production using survey questionnaire. In the context of food sufficiency condition, Jhapa was more food secured followed by Sindhuli and Kalikot. The majority of respondents also perceived that climatic factors has affected their cropping pattern. Among various climatic factor, drought was major cause of loss in cereal, legume and vegetable production as perceived by majority of respondents. On trend analysis of three districts from 1989-2013 by Mann-Kendall test showed that maximum temperature and average temperature was significantly increasing by 0.042°C/year and 0.044°C/year respectively. While rainfall was significantly decreasing by 22.779 mm/year. On the impact analysis of rice in Jhapa, rainfall has significantly negative relation at 5% confident level while relative humidity has significantly negative relation to rice yield at 10% confident level. Similarly, in Kalikot rainfall has significantly positive relation to rice yield at 10% confident level. The results also suggest that in wheat at Jhapa, maximum temperature has significantly positive relation to wheat yield at 10% confident level. Among the three districts, varietal richness was found in Jhapa. Majority of respondents in Jhapa and Sindhuli have changed their varieties and adapted new varieties. The adaptation of new crops varieties by the majority respondents was for the greater yield. As adaptive capacity varies from district to district, this study argues that plan and policy should be formulated and focused on the location specific adaptation mechanism under changing climate.

Keywords

References

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