ISSN (Print): 2333-4568

ISSN (Online): 2333-4576

Editor-in-Chief: B.D. Indu

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/IJP

   

Article

An IBM-2 Calculation of E2/M1 Multipole Mixing Ratios of Transitions in 90-96Sr

1Department of Physics, College of Science, AL-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IRAQ

2Department of Physics, College of Science, Mosul University, Mosul, IRAQ


International Journal of Physics. 2016, 4(1), 5-10
doi: 10.12691/ijp-4-1-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Saad Naji Abood, Laith Ahmed Najim. An IBM-2 Calculation of E2/M1 Multipole Mixing Ratios of Transitions in 90-96Sr. International Journal of Physics. 2016; 4(1):5-10. doi: 10.12691/ijp-4-1-2.

Correspondence to: Laith  Ahmed Najim, Department of Physics, College of Science, Mosul University, Mosul, IRAQ. Email: Prof.lai2014@gmail.com

Abstract

The interacting boson model is applied to the even strontium isotopes, 90-96Sr. Excitation energies, electromagnetic transition strengths, quadrupole and δ(E2/M1) multipole mixing ratios have been described systematically. It is seen that the properties of low-lying levels in these isotopes, for which the comparison between experiment and theory is possible, can be epistemologically satisfied by the Interacting Boson Model-2 (IBM-2).

Keywords

References

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Article

Transmission of Information and Interaction in the Mutual Motion of Two Physical Bodies MSR (Motion Shapes Reality)

1Mihailo Jeremić, independent Researcher, Mladenovac, Serbia


International Journal of Physics. 2016, 4(1), 11-20
doi: 10.12691/ijp-4-1-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mihailo M. Jeremić. Transmission of Information and Interaction in the Mutual Motion of Two Physical Bodies MSR (Motion Shapes Reality). International Journal of Physics. 2016; 4(1):11-20. doi: 10.12691/ijp-4-1-3.

Correspondence to: Mihailo  M. Jeremić, Mihailo Jeremić, independent Researcher, Mladenovac, Serbia. Email: nacrtmika@gmail.com

Abstract

When two bodies are in mutual motion, it should not be considered that one of them is stationary while the other moves or vice versa, but that both bodies move in relation to the center of mass (which is motionless, conditionally) and that they move at speeds dependent on the relationships of their masses, which is the consequence of the law of conservation of momentum. The time of a light signal travelling between two bodies A and B in mutual motion at the velocity of v0 depends on the relationship between the masses of these bodies mA and mB, so light signal travel time from the body A to the body B differs from the light signal travel time from the body B to the body A. In accordance with this, the following notions are defined: the relationship of the time difference (interval) between two successively emitted light signals from one body and the time difference (interval) of receiving these two signals by the other body, as well as the intensity and relationship between the relative velocities v of the two bodies measured from one body and from the other body. In addition, the expressions are derived for the Doppler shift in the function of velocity v0 of the mutual motion of two bodies A and B and the relationship between the masses of these bodies mA and mB. The results of this study prove that the formulae of the special theory of relativity (STR) have not been duly derived (since they disregard the masses of the bodies in mutual motion) and that they do not offer correct results.

Keywords

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Article

Universe, a Spacetime Harmonic Oscillator

1Department of Physics, Adelphi University, New York, USA


International Journal of Physics. 2016, 4(1), 21-25
doi: 10.12691/ijp-4-1-4
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M. Khoshsima. Universe, a Spacetime Harmonic Oscillator. International Journal of Physics. 2016; 4(1):21-25. doi: 10.12691/ijp-4-1-4.

Correspondence to: M.  Khoshsima, Department of Physics, Adelphi University, New York, USA. Email: mkhoshsima@adelphi.edu

Abstract

Energy field waves propagate in the fabric of spacetime. Interaction between spacetime field propagation and matter will generate physical photons. There are three regions of spacetime; (1) events in timelike region corresponding to the expanding universe, (2) events in lightlike region, the fabric of spacetime corresponding to spacetime with no expansion, (3) events in spacelike region corresponding to residual or evanescent universe. Universe is similar to a harmonic oscillator with two phase, right and left expansions. The equilibrium position for a two phase universe is the fabric of spacetime with surge of the stored energy in a singularity, expanding into the next phase of expansion. The evanescent universe is the spacelike event region where mass will decay. Expansion of universe and creation of matter is due to energy field propagation and superposition of energy fields in the fabric of spacetime.

Keywords

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