American Journal of Cancer Prevention

Current Issue» Volume 2, Number 2 (2014)

Article

Genetic Testing for Risk of Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study Examining Perceived Benefits and Barriers using Health Belief Model

1Division of Social and Administrative Sciences in Pharmacy, Oscar Rennebohm School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison

2Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York City

3School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Suwanee, Georgia


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2014, 2(2), 24-30
DOI: 10.12691/ajcp-2-2-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Karishma Desai, Bupendra Shah, Hamid Rahim, Hongjun Yin, John Lonie. Genetic Testing for Risk of Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study Examining Perceived Benefits and Barriers using Health Belief Model. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2014; 2(2):24-30. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-2-2-2.

Correspondence to: Karishma  Desai, Division of Social and Administrative Sciences in Pharmacy, Oscar Rennebohm School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Email: desaikaru@gmail.com

Abstract

Aim: To (i) assess participants’ awareness of the availability of genetic testing to determine the risk of different types of cancer; (ii) to assess participants’ beliefs about genetic testing for the risk of lung cancer using Health Belief Model; and (iii) to explore factors affecting intention to use genetic testing for risk of lung cancer. Methods: A sample of 360 New Jersey residents were surveyed by interviewers from three densely populated cities in the northern, central and southern regions of New Jersey. The survey instrument was developed using the Health Belief Model and measures were adapted from the literature. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with intention to use genetic testing. Results: A total of 360 individuals were surveyed in three cities in New Jersey. Of these, 50% were non-Hispanic White, female, and with an annual income of less than $50,000; 66% were nonsmokers without a family history of lung cancer. The overall intention to use the genetic test to determine lung cancer risk was low (35%), even though the majority of participants believed genetic testing for lung cancer to be highly beneficial, and despite believing it to be a severe condition [M(SD)=11.5(2.3)}. Approximately 50% of participants were aware of the availability of genetic tests for the risk of lung cancer, and respondents believed they were moderately susceptible to lung cancer [M(SD)=25.3(3.7)].Gender, education, smoking habits and perceived benefits of testing were significant predictors of intention. Conclusion: Awareness and intention to use genetic testing for the risk of lung cancer was low. This study provides useful information for healthcare professionals interested in promoting the use of genetic testing for at-risk populations such as smokers, and how to tailor interventions.

Keywords

References

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Article

Awareness and Knowledge of Smoking-Related Cancers Among University Students in Jordan

1Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2014, 2(2), 20-23
DOI: 10.12691/ajcp-2-2-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ayoub A. Innabi, Dina A. Ammari, Wa'el J. K. Tuqan. Awareness and Knowledge of Smoking-Related Cancers Among University Students in Jordan. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2014; 2(2):20-23. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-2-2-1.

Correspondence to: Ayoub  A. Innabi, Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan. Email: ayoubinnabi@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Jordan, a Middle Eastern country, has a high prevalence rate of smoking. However, little research was done to evaluate knowledge of smoking-related cancers in the region. Objective: To assess knowledge of smoking-related cancers among Jordanian university students. Design: Cross-sectional study conducted in July, 2013, using a self-administered online questionnaire. The questionnaire was sent to students from University of Jordan. Results: The final sample consisted of 230 students. The majority of participants (98.7%) were aware that smoking has harmful health effects and (95.7%) agreed that smoking causes cancer. Most of the participants agreed that smoking causes lung cancer (97.8%), oral cancer (83.0%), laryngeal cancer (82.6%), pharyngeal cancer (80.0%), and esophageal cancer (63.0%), while less than half of the participant thought that smoking causes AML (46.1%), stomach cancer (36.1%), kidney cancer (32.6%), cervical cancer (19.6%), pancreatic cancer (19.1%), and bladder cancer (14.8%). Females showed more knowledge about smoking-related cancers than males (p < 0.05) but the there was no significant difference between smokers and non-smokers. Conclusion: These findings show that most of the students know that lung cancer is caused by smoking. However, there is a lower knowledge of other smoking-related cancers. Our study suggests that more efforts should be done to increase the awareness of the adverse health hazards of smoking especially that are related to cancer.

Keywords

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