ISSN (Print): 2328-3947

ISSN (Online): 2328-3955

Editor-in-Chief: Hari K. Koul

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/AJBR

   

Article

Formulation Development and In-vitro Evaluation of Minoxidil Bearing Glycerosomes

1S.D. College of Pharmacy & Voc. Studies, Muzaffarnagar, (U.P.), India

2R.K.S.D College of Pharmacy, Kaithal (Haryana), India


American Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016, 4(2), 27-37
doi: 10.12691/ajbr-4-2-1
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Deepika Rani, Chhater Singh, Arvind Kumar, Vinit Kr. Sharma. Formulation Development and In-vitro Evaluation of Minoxidil Bearing Glycerosomes. American Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016; 4(2):27-37. doi: 10.12691/ajbr-4-2-1.

Correspondence to: Chhater  Singh, S.D. College of Pharmacy & Voc. Studies, Muzaffarnagar, (U.P.), India. Email: pharma_pharm@yahoo.com

Abstract

Present study was undertaken to assess the potential of Glycerosomes as a novel drug delivery system for topical application of Minoxidil. Pre-formulation studies were done for identification of drug as well as for determination of its physiochemical properties. Spectra of various mixtures of drug and excipients do not show any additional peak thus, indicating compatibility with each other. Glycerosomes was prepared by using lipid thin film hydration method. Prepared formulations were evaluated in terms of particle size, surface analysis, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in-vitro drug release. The formulated Glycerosomes were found to have better surface characteristics and entrapment efficiency. The in vitro drug dissolution study was carried out using egg membrane on modified franz diffusion cell and the release mechanisms were explored. The release data was incorporated into various mathematical models and the formulation follows Higuchi as well as Fickian diffusion. Results study proved that Glycerosomes containing Minoxidil can be an excellent therapy for Alopecia.

Keywords

References

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Article

Modulatory Effects of Ricinus Communis Leaf Extract on Cadmium Chloride-Induced Hyperlipidemia and Pancytopenia in Rats

1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic and Applied Sciences, Osun State University, Osogbo, Nigeri


American Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016, 4(2), 38-41
doi: 10.12691/ajbr-4-2-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Olu Israel OYEWOLE, Mojisola Oluwakemi SHOREMI, Johnson Olaleye OLADELE. Modulatory Effects of Ricinus Communis Leaf Extract on Cadmium Chloride-Induced Hyperlipidemia and Pancytopenia in Rats. American Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016; 4(2):38-41. doi: 10.12691/ajbr-4-2-2.

Correspondence to: Olu  Israel OYEWOLE, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic and Applied Sciences, Osun State University, Osogbo, Nigeri. Email: ioluoye@yahoo.com

Abstract

Cadmium (Cd) and its compounds are ubiquitous environmental toxins capable of inducing different types of toxicity in animals and human. Ricinus communis (castor bean) is a known medicinal plant with enormous health benefits. This study investigated the protective effects of ethanolic leaf extract of Ricinus communis on hyperlipidemia and pancytopenia induced by cadmium chloride in Wistar albino rats. Twenty five (25) adult male rats were divided into 5 groups of 5 rats each. Group A received distilled water, group B, C, D and E were administered 5mg/kg body weight CdCl2, group C, D and E were treated with 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg bw respectively of Ricinus communis leaf extract for 14 days while rats in group B were left untreated. Results obtained showed that administration of cadmium caused significant reduction in cellular elements of the blood (pancytopenia) as well as increase in the level of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and coronary heart disease risk ratio while it decrease the level of HDL-cholesterol. Treatment of rats with graded dose of Ricinus communis leaf extract significantly ameliorate the adverse effects of cadmium as it boosted cellular elements of the blood while it also reduced serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, coronary heart disease risk ratio as well as elevation of HDL-cholesterol level in the blood. We conclude that leaf extract of Ricinus communis has modulatory effects on cadmium induced pancytopenia and hyperlipidemia in rats.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Effect of Giving Trigona Honey and Honey Propolis Trigona to the mRNA Foxp3 Expression in Mice Balb/c Strain Induced by Salmonella Typhi

1Department of Epidemiology, Health College of RSU Daya, Makassar, Indonesia

2Department of Nursing, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia

3Department of Biochemistry, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia

4Department of ENT, Faculty of Medicine, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia

5Department Molecular Biology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia

6Department of Microbiology, Tadulako University, Palu, Indonesia

7Department of Clinical Pathology, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia

8Department of Chemistry, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia

9Department of Oncology, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia


American Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016, 4(2), 42-45
doi: 10.12691/ajbr-4-2-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Andi Nilawati Usman, Yuliana Syam, Rosdiana Natzir, Sutji Pratiwi Rahardjo, Mochammad Hatta, Ressy Dwiyanti, Yuyun Widaningsih, Ainurafiq, Prihantono. The Effect of Giving Trigona Honey and Honey Propolis Trigona to the mRNA Foxp3 Expression in Mice Balb/c Strain Induced by Salmonella Typhi. American Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016; 4(2):42-45. doi: 10.12691/ajbr-4-2-3.

Correspondence to: Mochammad  Hatta, Department Molecular Biology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia. Email: hattaram@indosat.net.id

Abstract

Immune balance during infection is important to support both the defense of body immune system and prevent excessive immune response. Protein Foxp3, a transcription factor of regulatory T cell has pivotal roles in balancing body immune system. Honey and Propolis have proved their effects to both the proinflamatory and anti inflammatory responses but their effects to the Foxp3 expression need to be investigated. This study was investigated the effect of giving Trigona honey and honey propolis Trigona to the mRNA Foxp3 expression in Balb/c mice induced Salmonella typhi. Results of the study indicated that honey propolis Trigona had the highest effect to the mRNA Foxp3 expression followed by Trigona honey. Both Trigona honey and honey propolis had immunomodulatory effects through the Foxp3 mRNA expression.

Keywords

References

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