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Article

A Corelational Study of Psychosocial & Spiritual Well Being and Death Anxiety among Advanced Stage Cancer Patients

1Barkatullah University, Bhopal, India

2Indian Institute of Forest Management, Bhopal, India


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(3), 59-65
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Pragya Shukla, Parul Rishi. A Corelational Study of Psychosocial & Spiritual Well Being and Death Anxiety among Advanced Stage Cancer Patients. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(3):59-65. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-1.

Correspondence to: Pragya  Shukla, Barkatullah University, Bhopal, India. Email: ps.psychologist@gmail.com

Abstract

Present study investigated the relationships among psychosocial, spiritual well being and death anxiety among advance stage cancer patients in order to improve the prognosis and quality of life as well as reduce their sufferings. By studying various well beings and death anxiety, it would be possible to identify the psychological needs of cancer patients in order to help the treatment of cancer patients and make them mentally strong to cope with their disease. Data was collected from Sample of 80 advance stage cancer patients, from six exclusive cancer hospitals of western and central zones of India. Patients were identified as advance stage patients as per clinical details (treatment history, diagnostic profile & records) and diagnosis was done by treating doctors of the hospital. Results were analyzed to identify the psychological needs of cancer patients. Obtained results were analyzed using SPSS for descriptive and variance analysis followed by multiple correlation. Results revealed negative correlation between psychosocial well being and death anxiety and also same results were found between spiritual well being and death anxiety. It indicates that enhancing the psychosocial and spiritual well being of cancer patients can reduce their death anxiety and promote better quality of life. Palliative care and Cognitive Behaviour therapy can play a very important role in this regard.

Keywords

References

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Article

Assessment of Brain Function in Music Therapy

1Neuroscience Departments, Functional Neurosurgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(3), 66-68
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Zarghi A, Zali A, Ashraf F, Moazezi S. Assessment of Brain Function in Music Therapy. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(3):66-68. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-2.

Correspondence to: Zarghi  A, Neuroscience Departments, Functional Neurosurgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Email: Dr.a.zarghi@hotmail.com

Abstract

Background: Music therapy, due to the characteristics and potential therapeutic applications, increase efficiency and provide treatment for the mental and physical relaxation. In effective therapy are used from well trained music therapists for providing the voice, body language and facial expressions. Methods: this procedure is performed after examination and imaging tests and in addition to the requirements of a therapeutic relationship. By the music therapist is discussed a clear sense for shared purpose. Results: A recent comprehensive meta-analysis of research on music has been performed, the results of which were presented to support this argument. Conclusion: The empirical studies show that there are positive steps in the effort to build a solid and dependable structure of empirical research in the field of the method.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Influence of Art-Making on Negative Mood States in University Students

1Lake Superior State University


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(3), 69-72
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Crystal R. Drake, H. Russell Searight, Kristina Olson-Pupek. The Influence of Art-Making on Negative Mood States in University Students. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(3):69-72. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-3.

Correspondence to: H.  Russell Searight, Lake Superior State University. Email: hsearight@lssu.edu

Abstract

This study examined the influence of art-making in a sample of 44 undergraduate students. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group or one of three art-making groups. Students in all groups completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Mini-POMS prior to and after a twenty minute participation in one of the four groups. Individuals in the art-making groups were randomly assigned to participate in coloring a pre-drawn mandala, a pre-drawn plaid design, or coloring free form on blank paper. There were significant reductions in negative mood states within each group, but there were no differences between the activities. In all of the groups, state anxiety declined significantly from pre- to post-test (p<.05). Participants in the plaid condition also exhibited significant reductions in depression (p<.03) and tension (p<.005). The findings suggest that coloring pre-drawn patterns may be useful as a stress reduction technique for university students.

Keywords

References

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Article

Assessing the Role of Community Care Coalition in Providing Psychosocial Support to HIV/AIDS Infected and Affected People

1Department of Psychology, College of Social Sciences and Languages, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(3), 73-81
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Binega Haileselassie. Assessing the Role of Community Care Coalition in Providing Psychosocial Support to HIV/AIDS Infected and Affected People. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(3):73-81. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-3-4.

Correspondence to: Binega  Haileselassie, Department of Psychology, College of Social Sciences and Languages, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia. Email: binegahh@yahoo.com

Abstract

Communities have their own means of managing crisis during time of difficulties and local networks like community care coalition plays prominent role in addressing basic needs of members of the community and HIV/AIDS infected people. HIV/AIDS affects all dimensions of person’s life and providing psychosocial support can help the infected people and their families to cope up effectively with each stage of the infection. In light of this, the main objective of this study was to examine and evaluate the role of Community Care Coalitions (CCCs) in providing psychosocial supports to people infected with and affected by HIV/AIDS. The research design employed was both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Participants were selected using both probability and non probability sampling techniques. Survey questionnaires, FGD, and key informant interviews were used. The reliability of the survey questions was checked with Cronbach’s alpha and measures of equivalence item analysis methods in pilot testing. The content validity of the items was also checked by the inter judge raters. Data obtained from survey questionnaires was analyzed quantitatively using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data was analyzed thematically in line with key elements of care and support to PLWHA and vulnerable groups. The finding indicates psychosocial support for PLWHA and their families is found to be very essential. The role of such community based care and support networks also play paramount significance in addressing the need of these target groups. The provision of psychosocial support as one separate care and support package within CCCs, create significant difference between beneficiaries level of service satisfaction, relationship between service providers and receivers for the t- value is less than the P, 0.05 with 95% CI. Therefore, the researcher believed that the care and support to PLWHA should be comprehensive enough.

Keywords

References

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Article

Psychosocial Problems and Coping Strategies of Female Sexually Abused Children: Issue for Policy Implication and Empowering the Victims

1Department of Psychology, College of Social Sciences and Languages, Mekelle, University,Mekelle, Ethiopia


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(4), 82-89
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Binega Haileselassie, Chalachew Wassie, Tsegazeab Kahsay, Yohannes Fisseha. Psychosocial Problems and Coping Strategies of Female Sexually Abused Children: Issue for Policy Implication and Empowering the Victims. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(4):82-89. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-1.

Correspondence to: Binega  Haileselassie, Department of Psychology, College of Social Sciences and Languages, Mekelle, University,Mekelle, Ethiopia. Email: binegahh@yahoo.com

Abstract

The experience of child sexual abuse can leave a host of adverse behavioral, emotional, and psychological consequences. The objective of this study, therefore, is to investigate the major psychosocial problems of sexually abused children and their coping mechanisms in Hamlin Fistula Hospital and Mother Teresa Charity Missionary’s Children’s Home. Qualitative methods namely in-depth interviews, observation, FGD and document analysis were used to collect the required data. The data were presented, organized and analyzed by using thematic analysis. The research finding reveals that, the survivor children are suffering from a whole range of physical, behavioral, social and emotional problems which in turn affect their personal wellbeing and social relations. However, some of the cases have not experienced some of the problems which others faced. As the result indicates incest type of child sexual abuse is the common form of sexual abuse that children face. The research result also shows strategies such as destructive behaviors like smoking, drinking, chewing and using substances; engaging in prostitution, begging, theft; attending religious places, deviating from social interaction and hiding themselves under some issues) were adopted by these sexually abused children to cope up with the sexual abuse and its related problems. Cooperation of different initiatives is imperative to solve the problem of sexually abused children in a sustainable manner. Therefore, the researchers believe that the GOs, NGOs, the community and other actors should integrate and coordinate different activities undertaken in relation to the problem of sexually abused children. It is also believed that community based strategies and empowering the victim children were identified as pillar of halting the problem. Besides, interested researchers could host similar researches with related to the multifaceted problem of abused children.

Keywords

References

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Article

The “Critical Mass Hypothesis”: Morphosynatx Development among Typically Developing Child and a Child with Developmental Language Disorder

1Department of Psychology, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(4), 90-93
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Abiot Yenealem Derbie. The “Critical Mass Hypothesis”: Morphosynatx Development among Typically Developing Child and a Child with Developmental Language Disorder. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(4):90-93. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-2.

Correspondence to: Abiot  Yenealem Derbie, Department of Psychology, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Email: dabiyen@gmail.com, abioty@bdu.edu.et

Abstract

Mass Critical Hypothesis is a new concept in the study of child language and/or developmental language disorder. The hypothesis states that the morphosyntax of children can develop only if they have acquired (or can produce) a certain amount of different words. The goal of the present research was to test the generalizability and reliability of the hypothesis. For this, one typically developing child and one child with developmental language disorder from Child Language Data Exchange System/CHILDES (MacWhinney, 2000) were taken. The CHAT file was non-elicited and non-directed spontaneous speech. Computerized Language Analysis (CLAN) v.30 for Windows was employed to analyze the non-elicited spontaneous speech of the typically developing child and the child with developmental language disorder. For both cases, Mean Length of Utterance (MLU) and Pearson product moment correlation coefficient (r) were calculated. Based on observed range of number of types of morpheme produced, the present study supports the notion of ‘Mass Critical Hypothesis’ existence in both typically developing child and the child with developmental language disorder.

Keywords

References

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Article

Loneliness and Bullying in the Workplace

1Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada

2Université Laval, Canada


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(4), 94-98
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Marc Dussault, Éric Frenette. Loneliness and Bullying in the Workplace. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(4):94-98. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-3.

Correspondence to: Marc  Dussault, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada. Email: Marc.Dussault@uqtr.ca

Abstract

This study assesses the relationship between workplace loneliness and bullying. French versions of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale (DeGrâce, Joshi, & Pelletier, 1933) and the Negative Acts Questionnaire – Revised (Einarsen, Hoel, &Notelaers, 2009)were administered to a sample of 153 French-Canadian workers. Results show that the feeling of isolation was positively related to work-related bullying. Moreover, the feeling of relational connectedness was strongly and negatively related to work-related bullying, person-related bullying, and physically intimidating bullying. Conversely, the feeling of collective connectedness was not related to any forms of bullying. This study is innovative in that it accounts for feelings of workplace loneliness in relation to the three-factor structure of the Negative Acts Questionnaire – Revised.

Keywords

References

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Article

Does Perceived Health Status Influence Quality of Life after Renal Transplantation

1Institute of Applied Psychology University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(4), 99-103
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Fatima Kamran. Does Perceived Health Status Influence Quality of Life after Renal Transplantation. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(4):99-103. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-4-4.

Correspondence to: Fatima  Kamran, Institute of Applied Psychology University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan. Email: fatimakamran24@yahoo.com

Abstract

Organ transplantation aims to restore physical health status and overall QoL. This longitudinal was carried out to find out how most renal transplant recipients (RTRs) in Pakistan, perceive their health status and overall QoL after a successful kidney transplant. Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) were studied at three waves over 15 months. QoL was assessed using Ferrens & Powers QoL Index- Kidney Transplant Version that evaluated four major domains of life post-transplant. These included; health functioning scale (HF), psychological and spiritual scale (PS), social and economic scale (SE) and family subscale (FS). Perceived Health Status was measured using a self-developed questionnaire assessing frequency and severity common immunosuppressant side effects. The findings revealed that most RTRs were satisfied with their QoL and had positive perceptions of their health status. A significant positive correlation among QoL and PHS was found. A cross lagged correlation analysis to find if perceived health status influences perceptions of QoL or vice versa showed that it cannot be claimed whether, QoL always influences how recipients perceive their health status due to an inconsistent pattern at wave 1 and 2 where the data suggest the relationship is working in the opposite direction.

Keywords

References

[1]  Akinlolu, O., Hanson, J.A., Wolfe, R.A., Leichtman, A.B., & Lawrence, Y. et al (2000). Long-term survival in renal transplant recipients with graft function Kidney International (57), 307-313.
 
[2]  Bohlke, M., Marini, S.S., Rocha, M., Terhorst, L., & Gomes, R.H. et al (2009). Factors associated with health-related quality of life after successful kidney transplantation: a population-based study. Quality of Life Research, 18 (9), 1185-93.
 
[3]  Caress, A.L, Luker, N.A & Owens, R.G (2001). A descriptive study of meaning of illness in chronic renal disease. Journal of Advanced Nursing, (33), 716-727.
 
[4]  Chang, C.L., & Tzou, H.Y. (2001). Stress and adaptation process of kidney transplant recipients experienced acute rejection. Kidney and Dialysis (13), 101-108.
 
[5]  Chen, K.H., Weng, L., & Sheuan, L. (2009). Stress and stress-related factors of patients after renal transplantation in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study. Journal of Clinical Nursing (19), 2539-2547.
 
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Article

Studying the Belief of Borderline Personality Disorder Patient about the Necessity of Medication and the Role of Demographic Factors in Adherence to Treatment

1Psychiatrist, Faculty Member and Assistant Professor of Islamic Azad University of Tehran

2Director of Psychology Department and Associate Professor of Islamic Azad University of Tehran


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(5), 104-108
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-5-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Bani Asad MH, Vahdat Shariaat Pana M, Hemmati MA. Studying the Belief of Borderline Personality Disorder Patient about the Necessity of Medication and the Role of Demographic Factors in Adherence to Treatment. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(5):104-108. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-5-1.

Correspondence to: Bani  Asad MH, Psychiatrist, Faculty Member and Assistant Professor of Islamic Azad University of Tehran. Email: dr.a.zarghi@hotmail.com

Abstract

Adherence to appropriate treatment and medicine taking plays a crucial role in the success of treatment especially in treating chronic diseases and total quality in patient as “user- client”. Patient adherence to treatment is dependent on their belief about the necessity of the taking medicine and their concerns over its effects. This paper aims at studying the effect of patient belief about the prescribed medicine and the role of some demographic factors including gender, age and educational level in adherence to disease. This descriptive-analytical via cross-sectional study was done through interviewing 38 patients with border line personality disorder and three valid and reliable questionnaires including demographic, BMQ and Morisky features. Result showed there was a significant and reverse relationship between the patients’ age and their adherence to treatment, but this did not apply to the patient gender. There was a significant and reverse relationship between educational level and adherence to treatment, in patients with a history of violence and history of hospitalized there was also a significant relationship between patient belief in the necessity of prescribed medicine and adherence. So, through demographic features, age was a significant and reverse relationship (P=0.001) to adherence. There was a significant and reverse relationship between educational level and adherence to treatment in two groups of outpatients and patients with a history of violence too. Accordingly the more educated patients adhered less to treatment, there was no significant relationship between adherence to treatment and educational level. Therefore, we concluded applying educational interventions in order to improve patient awareness about medication and their belief on necessity of treatment will promote their health.

Keywords

References

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Article

Measuring Twitter Sentiment and Implications for Social Psychological Research

1University of Texas of the Permian Basin


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(5), 109-113
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-5-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jason D. Carr. Measuring Twitter Sentiment and Implications for Social Psychological Research. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(5):109-113. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-5-2.

Correspondence to: Jason  D. Carr, University of Texas of the Permian Basin. Email: jd.carr.tx@gmail.com

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine whether Twitter comments on moral issues might be classified into sentiment categories and whether underlying emotions or thoughts will influence online interactions differently than they do in the real world. A mixed methods study involving qualitative analysis was conducted to compare Twitter sentiment about a current emotionally charged topic – immigration – amongst users. Results indicated that 73% of the commenters favorably view the idea of immigration reform and/or immigrant acceptance into the U.S. and are open to online dialog. Conversely, the findings for negative comments demonstrated that users likely have underlying feelings or thoughts on the subject of immigration that in turn may cause them to interact differently online than they do in a real world setting. Stereotyping and/or bigotry may influence their communications both online and off. These findings support the need for further research to improve upon existing social psychology theories. Additionally, despite challenges present in studies of this nature, Twitter shows great promise for conducting social psychological studies in the future.

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