World Journal of Agricultural Research

ISSN (Print): 2333-0643

ISSN (Online): 2333-0678

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Article

Comparison of Phytochemicals Antioxidant Activity and Essential Oil Content of Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae) with Four Selected Spice Crop Species

1Department of Plantation Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Plantation Management, Wayamba University of Sri Lanka, Makandura, Gonawila (NWP), Sri Lanka.

2Industrial Technology Institute, Bauddhaloka Mawatha, Colombo 07, Sri Lanka


World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2016, 4(6), 158-161
doi: 10.12691/wjar-4-6-1
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
E.J.S. De Soysa, D.C. Abeysinghe, R.M. Dharmadasa. Comparison of Phytochemicals Antioxidant Activity and Essential Oil Content of Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae) with Four Selected Spice Crop Species. World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2016; 4(6):158-161. doi: 10.12691/wjar-4-6-1.

Correspondence to: R.M.  Dharmadasa, Industrial Technology Institute, Bauddhaloka Mawatha, Colombo 07, Sri Lanka. Email: dharmadasarm@gmail.com

Abstract

Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae) (Eng.Allspice) is an industrially and therapeutically important, evergreen aromatic spice plant widely used in food, perfumery and cosmetic industries around the globe. Allspice, which tastes like a blend of Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume, Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton, Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. &L.M.Perry and Myristica fragrans Houtt. is a common flavoring compound in Asian, Middle Eastern and Jamaican cuisines. However, comparative essential oil content, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total phenolic content (TPC) of these similar taste spices is scattered. Therefore, the present study compares the qualitative phytochemical contents, essential oil contents, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total phenolic content (TPC) of C. zeylanicum, E. cardamomum, S. aromaticum and Myristica fragrans Houtt. with leaf extracts of Pimenta dioica using previously published protocols. Results revealed that all tested phytochemicals namely alkaloids, flavanoids, saponins, steroid glycosides and tannins are present in all selected spice species compared. The highest essential oil content was reported from clove buds followed by nutmeg mace, nutmeg seed, cardamom, allspice and cinnamon respectively. Leaf extracts of P. dioica exhibited significantly higher total antioxidant capacity (344.9 ± 4.2 mg TE/g DW) and total phenolic content (134.3 ± 7.6 mg GAE/g DW) compared to selected spices except clove. Presence of all tested phytochemicals, comparable amounts of essential oils, greater amount of total antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content undoubtedly demonstrate high potential of Pimenta dioica (allspice) as a spice crop for large scale cultivation in Sri Lanka.

Keywords

References

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[13]  Abeysiri, G.R.P.I., Dharmadasa, R.M., Abeysinghe, D.C. and Samarasinghe, K. (2013). Screening of phytochemical, physico-chemical and bioactivity of different parts of Acmella oleraceae Murr. (Asteraceae), a natural remedy for toothache. Industrial Crops and Products, 50, 852-856.
 
[14]  Dharmadasa, R.M., Siriwardana, A., Samarasinghe, K. and Adhihetty, P. (2013a). Standardization of Gyrinops walla Gaertn. (Thymalaeaceae): Newly discovered Fragrant Industrial Potential Endemic Plant from Sri Lanka. World journal of Agricultural research, 1, 101-103.
 
[15]  Dharmadasa R.M., Samarasinghe, K., Adhihetty, P. and Hettiarachchi, P.L. (2013b). Comparative Pharmacognostic Evaluation of Munronia pinnata (Wall.) Theob. (Meliaceae) and Its Substitute Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. Ex Nees (Acanthaceae). World Journal of Agricultural Research, 1, 77-81.
 
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Article

Distribution of Phytochemicals and Bioactivity in Different Parts and Leaf Positions of Stevia Rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni- a Non-caloric, Natural Sweetener

1Department of Plantation Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Plantation Management, Wayamba University of Sri Lanka, Makandura, Gonawila (NWP), Sri Lanka

2Industrial Technology Institute, Bauddhaloka Mawatha, Colombo 07, 00700, Sri Lanka


World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2016, 4(6), 162-165
doi: 10.12691/wjar-4-6-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
K.L.N.W. Kumari, D.C. Abeysinghe, R.M. Dharmadasa. Distribution of Phytochemicals and Bioactivity in Different Parts and Leaf Positions of Stevia Rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni- a Non-caloric, Natural Sweetener. World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2016; 4(6):162-165. doi: 10.12691/wjar-4-6-2.

Correspondence to: R.M.  Dharmadasa, Industrial Technology Institute, Bauddhaloka Mawatha, Colombo 07, 00700, Sri Lanka. Email: dharmadasarm@gmail.com

Abstract

Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni (Asteraceae) is a small perennial herb which is widely cultivated for its sweet leaves and possesses 250-300 times the sweetness than sucrose due to the presence of steviol glycosides (mainly stevioside and rebaudioside). It is commonly known as candy leaf, sweet leaf and sugar leaf. Even though, this plant has been studied extensively for its sweetness, information on therapeutically important active components presence in stevia is scattered or lacking. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the distribution of Total Phenolic Content (TPC), Total Flavonoid Content (TFC) and Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) of different parts and different leaf positions of S. rebaudiana. Leaf fresh weight, dry weight and leaf area at different leaf positions were recorded. The TAC, TPC and TFC were determined using Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power Assay (FRAP), modified Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and calorimetric method respectively. Leaf fresh weight and leaf dry weight were increased with the maturity. All tested plant parts demonstrated the presence of TPC, TFC and TAC. The significantly higher TPC, TFC and TAC were reported in leaves than other parts of plant. The order of increase of active components was leaf>flower>stem>branch>root. TPC, TFC and TAC of different leaf positions revealed that TAC, was decreased gradually from immature to mature leaf (1st leaf>2nd leaf>3rd leaf>4th leaf>5th leaf). Moreover, all tested phytochemicals (phenolics and flavonoids) and antioxidant capacity were significantly higher in extracts prepared from the first leaf. Interestingly, a strong significant correlations were observed between TAC and tested secondary metabolites (TFC, R2=0.85). The results of the present study are vital important in cultivation, harvesting and quality control aspects of S. rebaudiana.

Keywords

References

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Article

Efficiency of Single and Multiple Traits Selection for Yield and Its Components in Varietal Maintenance of Giza 90 Egyptian Cotton Variety

1Cotton research institute, Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Cairo, Egypt

2Agronomy Department, College of Agriculture, Assiut University, 71526 Assiut, Egypt


World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2016, 4(6), 166-172
doi: 10.12691/wjar-4-6-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nour Ibrahim, Salah F. Abou-Elwafa, Hamdi Mahrous, Abdel-Azeem A. Ismail, Ezzat E. Mahdy. Efficiency of Single and Multiple Traits Selection for Yield and Its Components in Varietal Maintenance of Giza 90 Egyptian Cotton Variety. World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2016; 4(6):166-172. doi: 10.12691/wjar-4-6-3.

Correspondence to: Salah  F. Abou-Elwafa, Agronomy Department, College of Agriculture, Assiut University, 71526 Assiut, Egypt. Email: elwafa75@aun.edu.eg

Abstract

Cotton is an important commercial crop of Egypt. The present study was carried out to study the possibility of selection of elite high yielding plants characterized by the same fiber properties of the superior cultivar Giza 90. To attain this goal two cycles of selection for single trait selection for lint yield/plant and 14 selection indices (desired genetic gain index) were achieved. Average observed genetic gain of the ten selected families after two cycles of selection indicated that LY/P ranged from insignificant (16.57%) for index 2 (LY/P and BW) to 21.63% (P ≤0.01) for index 7 (NB/P and NS/B). Index 2 increased BW by 9.27% (p ≤ 0.05) and UHM length by 2.23% (p ≤ 0.01). Index 7 showed significant genetic gain of 20.26, 21.63, 3.16, 5.44 and 2.785 for SCY/P, LY/P, SI, PI, and UHM length, respectively. Index 3 showed significant genetic gain of 19.71, 21.36, 3.61, 7.82, and 2.65% for SCY/P, LY/P, SI, PI and UHM length, respectively. Index 13 gave significant genetic gain 18.46, 20.55 and 5.76% for SCY/P, LY/P and PI, respectively. Single trait selection for LY/P showed significant genetic gain of 19.75, 20.30 and 14.01% for SCY/P, LY/P and NB/P, respectively. The results indicated that selection index was better than single trait selection in detecting the superior families in LY/P. Generally, it could be concluded that the present program for maintenance and renewing Egyptian cotton varieties is a precise and perfect program to preserve the fiber quality, but, not suitable for improving yielding ability. In consequence, this program should be modified to allow the isolation of superior high yielding off types from the breeding nursery characterized by improvement in one or more fiber quality.

Keywords

References

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