Journal of Food and Nutrition Research

ISSN (Print): 2333-1119

ISSN (Online): 2333-1240

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/JFNR

Article

Effect of Phytochemicals on the Antioxidative Activity of Brain Lipids in High- and Low-fat-fed Mice and Their Structural Changes during in vitro Digestion

1Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Seodong-daero, Daeduk-myeon, Anseong-Si, Gyeonggi, Korea

2Department of Food Science and Technology Chung-Ang University, Seodong-daero, Daedeok-myeon, Anseong-si, Gyeonggi, Korea


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(4), 274-280
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-4-7
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Seung Jae Lee, Seung Yuan Lee, Myung-Sub Chung, Sun Jin Hur. Effect of Phytochemicals on the Antioxidative Activity of Brain Lipids in High- and Low-fat-fed Mice and Their Structural Changes during in vitro Digestion. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(4):274-280. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-4-7.

Correspondence to: Sun  Jin Hur, Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Seodong-daero, Daeduk-myeon, Anseong-Si, Gyeonggi, Korea. Email: hursj@cau.ac.kr

Abstract

The brain lipid samples were collected from the brains of low- and high-fat-fed mice and incubated with the in vitro-digested phytochemicals to determine lipid oxidation. After digestion in the mouth, the 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical-scavenging activity and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of quercetin and catechin were higher than those of rutin. In contrast, ABTS radical-scavenging activity and FRAP were higher in catechin and rutin than in quercetin after digestion in the stomach. The automated oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) was highest in catechin during in vitro digestion in the brain lipids of both high- and low-fat-fed mice. After digestion in the mouth, the inhibitory effect of rutin lipid oxidation was higher than those of quercetin and catechin, whereas after digestion in the stomach, the inhibitory effect of lipid oxidation in catechin and rutin was stronger than that of quercetin in brain lipids obtained from both low- and high-fat-fed mice.

Keywords

References

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Article

Inhibitory Effect of Cancer Cells Proliferation from Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate

1Department of Korean Food & Culinary Arts, Youngsan University, Busan, Korea


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(4), 281-284
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-4-8
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Hyun Woo Kang. Inhibitory Effect of Cancer Cells Proliferation from Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(4):281-284. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-4-8.

Correspondence to: Hyun  Woo Kang, Department of Korean Food & Culinary Arts, Youngsan University, Busan, Korea. Email: khw7200@ysu.ac.kr

Abstract

Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea and a functional food ingredient/nutraceutical with health-promoting properties. However, its anti-cancer activities on various cancer cells are still little information. Here, we show that anti-cancer activities of the EGCG were evaluated using apoptosis assays analyzed by flow cytometry. The inhibitory activities of proliferation in MPC-11, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, values were 66.2, 60.3, and 74.8% at 10 μM, respectively. In addition, in an flow cytometry assay on the MPC-11, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, the EGCG showed a cell apoptosis effect on cancer/tomor in vitro model. Our results indicate that EGCG has anti-cancer activities against human lung cancer cells through inducing cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and activating mitochondrial signal pathway. These results indicate that EGCG effectively inhibits in vitro tumor growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells.

Keywords

References

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Article

An Analysis of Household’s Yogurt Consumption in Turkey

1Department of Food Engineering, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey

2Department of Agricultural Economics, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(4), 285-289
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-4-9
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
GEZGINC Yekta, AKBAY Cuma. An Analysis of Household’s Yogurt Consumption in Turkey. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(4):285-289. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-4-9.

Correspondence to: GEZGINC  Yekta, Department of Food Engineering, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey. Email: yekgan@ksu.edu.tr

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate specific consumer and household characteristics that affect consumption decision of yogurt, by using a cross-sectional survey data from 8549 households in Turkey. This study showed that about 81.8% of the households consume fluid milk and 78% of the households consume yogurt on a monthly basis. The results indicated that socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of households such as household income, household size, education, age, working status and gender of household head and, residential areas (rural-urban) were statistically significant factors and play an important role on yogurt consumption among Turkish households. Results from these analyses are used to suggest techniques for marketing yogurt consumption to specific segments of consumer population. Moreover, this research provides a profile of households that consume and probably spend more on yogurt.

Keywords

References

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Article

Effect of Various Herbal Medicine Extracts on the Physico-chemical Properties of Emulsion-type Pork Sausage

1Department of Animal Resources Technology, Gyeongnam National University of Science and Technology, Jinju, Korea

2Swine Science & Technology Center, Gyeongnam National University of Science and Technology, Jinju, Korea

3Department of Animal Science & Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong, Korea


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(5), 290-296
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sang-Keun Jin, So-Ra Ha, Sun-Jin Hur, Jung-Seok Choi. Effect of Various Herbal Medicine Extracts on the Physico-chemical Properties of Emulsion-type Pork Sausage. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(5):290-296. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-1.

Correspondence to: Jung-Seok  Choi, Swine Science & Technology Center, Gyeongnam National University of Science and Technology, Jinju, Korea. Email: hursj@cau.ac.kr; choijs@gntech.ac.kr

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of herbal medicine aqueous extracts as natural preservatives to improve the quality characteristics and oxidative stability of emulsion-type pork sausage. The pH value was significantly higher in sausages of control than in groups containing herbal medicine extracts (p<0.05). The shear force values increased with the addition of herbal medicine extracts (p<0.05). The addition of herbal medicine extracts also reduced the lightness and redness, and increased the yellowness, chroma, and hue observed during storage (p<0.05). In addition, the anti-oxidative activity including 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), peroxide value (POV), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazla hydrate (DPPH) was higher in the Akebiaquinata (T3), Lonicera japonica (T4), and Chelidoniummajus (T5) groups than in the other groups (p<0.05). In a sensory evaluation, the Liriopeplatyphylla (T1) and Saposhnikoviaedivaricata (T2) groups scored lower than the control, whereas the T3, T4, and T5 groups showed similar attributes compared with the control. In conclusion, the addition of herbal medicine extracts did not have negative effects on the quality of emulsion-type pork sausage, and they could be used as a natural antioxidant material to prevent lipid oxidation in meat products.

Keywords

References

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Article

Immunomodulation Effect of Metabolites from Lactobacillus Rhamnosus GG on Interleukins Release in Vitro

1Department of Human Nutrition, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Poland

2Department of Food Process Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Poland


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(5), 297-302
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-2
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Edyta Balejko, Anna Bogacka, Jerzy Balejko, Elżbieta Kucharska. Immunomodulation Effect of Metabolites from Lactobacillus Rhamnosus GG on Interleukins Release in Vitro. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(5):297-302. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-2.

Correspondence to: Edyta  Balejko, Department of Human Nutrition, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Poland. Email: Edyta.Balejko@zut.edu.pl

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine in vitro whether the metabolites of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG stimulate the release of selected cytokines from lymphocytes. Cell cultures from whole human blood were established. The concentration of TGF-β1, IFN-γ and IL-4 was determined in cultures liquid by ELISA. Lactobacillus GG rods were immobilized in alginate microcapsules. To determine the tightness of the capsules their surfaces were observed by electron microscopy. During 14 days the migration of the bacteria to outside of the capsules was not observed. In liquid from cell cultures of lymphocytes the increase of TGF-β1 and IL-4 and the decrease in IFN-γ concentration were observed, influenced by Lactobacillus GG metabolites enclosed in lyophilized alginate microcapsules, as compared to control group. The possible stimulants were exopolysaccharide and Lactobacillus GG metabolites, i.e. lactic acid, nitrogen oxide and hydrogen peroxide.

Keywords

References

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Article

Changes of Fatty Acids Composition in Beef under Different Thermal Treatment

1Deptartment of Food Science and Engineering / Collaborative Innovation Center for Modern Grain Circulation and Safety, Nanjing University of Finance and Economics, Nanjing, China

2China Rural Technology Development Center, Beijing, China


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(5), 303-310
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-3
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Yinji Chen, Jun Cao, Bingye Dai, Weixin Jiang, Yuling Yang, Wen Dong. Changes of Fatty Acids Composition in Beef under Different Thermal Treatment. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(5):303-310. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-3.

Correspondence to: Yinji  Chen, Deptartment of Food Science and Engineering / Collaborative Innovation Center for Modern Grain Circulation and Safety, Nanjing University of Finance and Economics, Nanjing, China. Email: chenyinji@hotmail.com

Abstract

Beef semitendinosus muscles were collected from ten bulls’ carcasses and used to determine fatty acids changes with different thermal treatment, boiling or microwave cooking. The results obtained show variabilities of fatty acids profiles in neutral lipid (NL), polar lipid (PL) and total lipid (TL) fraction under different internal temperature (60°C, 70°C or 80°C). Generally, in NL fraction (mainly beef intramuscular fat), content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increased (P < 0.05) significantly with boiling compared with raw beef, however, content of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and PUFA unchanged (P > 0.05) with the method of microwave cooking. On considering health benefit, it is proposed that beef with abundant intramuscular fat were more suitable for being treated with boiling, not microwave cooking. In PL and TL fraction, content of PUFA decreased (P < 0.05) with boiling and microwave cooking comparing with raw beef. Ratios of P/S (PUFA to saturated fatty acid (SFA)) decreased in TL with boiling or microwave cooking, whistle, ratios of M/S (MUFA to SFA) did not change under two thermal treatments in TL. Values of n-6/n-3 (n-6 PUFA to n-3 PUFA) increased significantly when beef internal temperature reached 80°C comparing with 60°C or 70°C despite being boiled or microwave cooked. Based on these observations, we considered that beef should not be over-heated when treated with boiling or microwave cooking to achieve premium ratio of n-6/n-3, the terminal core temperature of around 70°C was more appropriate.

Keywords

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Article

Effect of Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus casei on Luteolin Found in Simulated Human Digestion System

1Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, 4726 Seodong-daero, Daedeok-myeon, Anseong-si, Gyeonggi 450-756, Republic of Korea


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(5), 311-316
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-4
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Seung-Jae Lee, Seung Yuan Lee, Sun Jin Hur. Effect of Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus casei on Luteolin Found in Simulated Human Digestion System. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(5):311-316. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-4.

Correspondence to: Sun  Jin Hur, Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, 4726 Seodong-daero, Daedeok-myeon, Anseong-si, Gyeonggi 450-756, Republic of Korea. Email: hursj@cau.ac.kr

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the effects of in vitro human digestion and enterobacteria (Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus casei) on the digestibility and structure of luteolin. Luteolin was passed through an in vitro digestion system that simulates the composition of the human mouth, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine and contains enterobacteria. The luteolin content was not altered by mouth or stomach digestion, but it was decreased by small intestine digestion. Large intestine digestion by enterobacteria also decreased the luteolin content; L. casei reduced the luteolin content more than E. coli. Moreover, digestion in the large intestine by a combination of E. coli and L. casei reduced the luteolin content more than digestion by individual enterobacteria. This study will provide insight into how enterobacteria influence the digestibility and structure of phytochemicals.

Keywords

References

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Article

Hypolipidemic Action of hydroxycinnamic Acids from Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) on Hypercholesterolaemic Rat in Relation to Its Antioxidant Activity

1Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital/West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, P.R. China

2Intensive care unit, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, P.R. China

3College of Mathematics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, P.R. China


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(5), 317-324
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-5
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Chengjie Ji, Chenwei Li, Weihong Gong, Hai Niu, Wen Huang. Hypolipidemic Action of hydroxycinnamic Acids from Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) on Hypercholesterolaemic Rat in Relation to Its Antioxidant Activity. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(5):317-324. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-5.

Correspondence to: Wen  Huang, Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital/West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, P.R. China. Email: niuhai@scu.edu.cn, huangwen@scu.edu.cn

Abstract

Cabbage extract containing chlorogenic acid has notable scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anion radicals, DPPH radicals as well as potent reducing power. Oral administration of the extract (240 mg/kg BW/day) to hypercholesterolaemic rats reduced by high–fat diet for 30 days lowered their blood TC, TG, and LDL–C levels by 36.3, 43.5 and 45.8%, respectively. However, the blood HDL–C levels in the same treated rats increased by 17.1%. Treatment of hypercholesterolaemic rats with the extract significantly increased the GSH level along with enhanced SOD, CAT activities in liver tissues. Furthermore, the extract significantly decreased hepatic MDA as well as GPx and GR activities in extract–treated rats. It can therefore be concluded that the extract has a high hypolipidaemic activity and this may be attributed to its antioxidative potential.

Keywords

References

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Article

Proteomic Analysis of Human Breast Cancer Cells Treated with Monascus-Fermented Red Mold Rice Extracts

1Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Jinxue Rd., Daliao Dist., Kaohsiung, Taiwan

2Department of Seafood Sciences, National Kaohsiung Marine University, Haijhuan Rd., Nanzih Dist., Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

3Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Chang Jung Christian University, No.1,Changda Rd., Gueiren District, Tainan City, Taiwan

4Department of Life Science, National Taitung University, Sec.1 Chunghua Rd., Taitung, Taiwan

5Department of Nutrition and Health Science, Fooyin University, Jinxue Rd., Daliao Dist., Kaohsiung, Taiwan


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(5), 325-329
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-6
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Chu-I Lee, Shu-Ling Hsieh, Chih-Chung Wu, Chun-Lin Lee, Yueh-Ping Chang, Jyh-Jye Wang. Proteomic Analysis of Human Breast Cancer Cells Treated with Monascus-Fermented Red Mold Rice Extracts. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(5):325-329. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-6.

Correspondence to: Jyh-Jye  Wang, Department of Nutrition and Health Science, Fooyin University, Jinxue Rd., Daliao Dist., Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Email: ft054@fy.edu.tw

Abstract

Monascus-fermented red mold rice (RMR) extracts have recently been proved to possess anticancer activities, but the anticancer effect of breast cancer cells treated with RMR is not yet well understood. In an effort to identify proteins that may be involved in RMR-induced breast cancer cell death, we employed proteomic analysis coupled with LC-nanoESI-MS/MS on MCF-7 cells exposed to two RMR extracts, ethyl acetate extract (EAE) and ethanol extract (EE). Sixupregulated proteins were identified in EAE-induced MCF-7 cells, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component, heat shock 27 kDa protein 1, cathepsin D, protein disulphideisomerase A3, and prohibitin. The upregulated expression of other 4 proteins was seen in EE-induced MCF-7 cells, including alloalbuminvenezia, annexin A5, endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 isoform 1 precursor, and cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2. The same two down-regulated proteins were identified on cells after treatment with both extracts, dermcidin preproprotein and poly(rC) binding protein 1. These proteins have been implicated in proapoptotic regulation, stress modulation, tumor suppression, and survival factor activity. These analysescould provide valuable information for further exploration of RMR as a promising chemopreventive agent against breast cancer.

Keywords

References

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Article

Proximate Composition, Phenolic Contents and in vitro Antioxidant Properties of Pimpinella stewartii (A Wild Medicinal Food)

1School of Light Industry and Food Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guanzhou 510641, China

2Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(5), 330-336
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-7
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Arshad Mehmood Abbasi, Xinbo Guo. Proximate Composition, Phenolic Contents and in vitro Antioxidant Properties of Pimpinella stewartii (A Wild Medicinal Food). Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(5):330-336. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-5-7.

Correspondence to: Arshad  Mehmood Abbasi, School of Light Industry and Food Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guanzhou 510641, China. Email: arshad799@yahoo.com

Abstract

Present study was intended to examine proximate nutritional and minerals composition, phenolic contents and in vitro antioxidant properties of Pimpinella stewartii, a commonly utilized species as medicinal and flavoring agent by the inhabitants of Pakistani Himalayas. Ethnomedicinal data were collected by semi structured interviews and questionnaires. Standard analytical methods were applied to determine nutrients, minerals and phenolic contents, where as free radical scavenging activities and total antioxidant properties were estimated by different assays. Results indicated that Pimpinella stewartii is an excellent source of carbohydrates, proteins and dietary fibers. Likewise, this specie also contains significant levels of K (6332 ± 56.1), Ca (3141 ± 47.0), Fe (1512 ± 18.7) and Mg (478.6 ±11.4) mg/kg. Comparatively, water extracts showed higher concentrations of phenolic contents than acetone extracts, showing significant difference (p<0.05). Flavonoid content was maximum in water extract at 98.67 ± 0.14 mg Rt Eq/100 g FW, followed by flavonols, total phenolics and ascorbic acid. Phosphomolibdenium complex assay (PMA) exhibited highly significant total antioxidant capacity at 86.26 ± 0.53 µM AAE/100g FW for acetone extract, followed by % DPPH radical scavenging activity (62.39 ± 0.40), whereas in water extracts measured levels were highest for ferrous ion chelating activity and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Pimpinella stewartii was found rich source of nutrients and phenolic contents, and demonstrated significant in vitro antioxidant properties. Furthermore, in depth investigation of phytochemical profiling, in vivo antioxidant properties and biological activities could be useful to promote consumer health and prevention of degenerative diseases.

Keywords

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