Journal of Food and Nutrition Research

ISSN (Print): 2333-1119

ISSN (Online): 2333-1240

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/JFNR

Article

Effect of Rice–based Fat Substitute on Gelation of Myofibrillar Proteins

1College of Food Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Finance and Economics/ Key Laboratory of Grain and Oils Quality Control and Deep-Utilizing Technology of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 210046, China


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 152-156
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-4
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Yuling Yang, Yuan You, Xiaobei Peng, Yinji Chen, Yun Ma. Effect of Rice–based Fat Substitute on Gelation of Myofibrillar Proteins. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):152-156. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-4.

Correspondence to: Yuling  Yang, College of Food Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Finance and Economics/ Key Laboratory of Grain and Oils Quality Control and Deep-Utilizing Technology of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 210046, China. Email: yangyuling2014@126.com

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the effect of rice–based fat substitute (FS) on heat-induced gelation of myofibrillar proteins (MP) from chicken breast muscle. The secondary structure, calorimetric and rheological attributes (α-helix, β-sheet, heat flow and G’) of FS and MP mixtures were measured during gel formation. The results indicated that the addition of FS led to easier denaturation of myosin but delayed denaturation of actin. The α-helix content in the MP-FS mixture was lower than that of MP, whilst β-sheet content in the MP-FS mixture was higher than that of MP when heating temperature was higher than 60 °C, indicating that the addition of FS could promoted MP molecules unfolding and aggregating at higher temperature. The G’ value of the MP-FS mixture was higher than that of MP during heating. The initial gelling temperatures of the MP sample and the MP-FS sample were 42 °C according to G’ curves. The hardness value of the MP-FS gel was higher than that of the MP gel at temperature over 60 °C, and reached the maximum value at . Scanning electron microscopy showed that FS changed the microstructure of MP gel. It was concluded that the addition of FS promoted MP molecule unfolding, aggregating and gelling at heating temperature over 60 °C, but FS did not change the initial gelling temperature of MP molecules and the optimal gel-forming temperature.

Keywords

References

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Article

Quality of Potato Chips as Influenced by Aloe Vera Coating

1Department of Agriculture Sciences, University of Haripur, Haripur Pakistan;

2Department of Food Technology, PMAS, Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan;

3Department of Agriculture and Food Technology, Karakoram International University, Gilgit, Pakistan


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 157-161
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-5
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kashif Sarfraz Abbasi, Tariq Masud, Sartaj Ali, Talat Mahmood, Azhar Hussain, Muhammad Liaquat, Muhammad Jahangir. Quality of Potato Chips as Influenced by Aloe Vera Coating. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):157-161. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-5.

Correspondence to: Sartaj  Ali, Department of Agriculture and Food Technology, Karakoram International University, Gilgit, Pakistan. Email: sartaj_kiu@yahoo.com

Abstract

The objectives of the current endeavor were to develop a healthy halal product with greater consumer acceptance level. Chips prepared from stored potatoes (10±1°C and 70±5% relative humidity) at thirty days interval were coated with different concentrations of aloe vera gel before frying. Significant variations (p<0.05) were observed in the quality attributes as a result of gel concentrations and storage intervals. The coated chips were found high in moisture content with lower fat absorption and appreciable sensorial scores. While comparing the different concentrations of aloe vera, it revealed that 10 and 20% gel produced potato chips with acceptable color which can also be associated with low perceived acryl amide formation. Steady increase in oil uptake and moisture contents with reduction in sensory scores was observed along the extended storage intervals. The overall results revealed that 20% aloe vera gel proved to be the best coating for potato chips with moderate moisture contents, reduced oil uptake and appreciable sensorial scores.

Keywords

References

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Article

Antimicrobial Effects of Camel Milk against Some Bacterial Pathogens

1Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Turabah, Taif University, Saudi Arabia

2Reproductive diseases Department, Animal Reproduction Research Institute, Al-Haram, Egypt

3Medical Laboratory Department, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Turabah, Taif University, Saudi Arabia

4Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Benha University, Egypt

5Immunopharmacology Unit, Animal Reproduction Research Institute, Al-Haram, Egypt


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 162-168
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-6
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Magdy Hassan YASSIN, Mahamed Mohamed Soliman, Salama Abd-Elhafez Mostafa, Hussein Abdel-Maksoud Ali. Antimicrobial Effects of Camel Milk against Some Bacterial Pathogens. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):162-168. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-6.

Correspondence to: Magdy  Hassan YASSIN, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Turabah, Taif University, Saudi Arabia. Email: magdymyh@gmail.com

Abstract

The present study was aimed to investigate the protective effects of camel milk against pathogenicity induced by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and E. coli in Wistar rats. Sixty healthy adult male Wistar rats were divided into six groups (10 per group). Group 1 served as a control without any treatment. Group 2 received camel milk for two consecutive weeks. Group 3 injected intraperitoneally (IP) by S. aureus in a doses of 2x109 CFU/ml per rat. Group 4 injected IP by E.coli in a dose of 5x1010 CFU/ml per rat. Group 5 supplemented with camel milk for two consecutive weeks and then injected IP by S.aureus (2x109 CFU/ml per rat). Group 6 supplemented with camel milk for two consecutive weeks and then injected IP by E.coli (5x1010 CFU/ml per rat). All animals were decapitated after 3 weeks, serum was extracted and liver, kidney and lung tissues were taken for pathogen isolation. The isolation rate and pathogenicity of S. aureus and E. coli was high in rats injected pathogens alone (group 3 and 4) compared to camel milk and pathogens administered rats (group 5 and 6). The isolation of S. aureus and E. coli was high in intestine, then lung, kidney and liver. Prior camel milk supplementation ameliorated the degree of pathogenicity induced by pathogens. Camel milk had synergistic action with ciprofloxacin against S. aureus and E. coli to reduce bacterial resistance and decrease the dose of antibiotics. Pathogens injection alone induced significant amelioration in liver and kidney functions and prior camel milk administration inhibited such changes. Moreover, oxidative stress represented by the increase in malondialdehyde levels in serum of pathogens injected rats was decreased by prior camel milk administration. In conclusion, camel milk has beneficial role as antibacterial food supplement against S.aureus and E.coli pathogenicity in Wistar rats.

Keywords

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Article

Antioxidant Activities Estimated by Different Measurments and Inhibitory Potential against Angiotensin Ⅰ- Converting Enzyme of Protein Hydrolysates from Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) Seed Cake

1Department of Tea Science, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, China

2Zhejiang Tea Science Society, Hangzhou, China


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 169-175
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-7
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Qianfei Huang, Limin Mao, Le Ying, Yuefei Wang, Ping Xu. Antioxidant Activities Estimated by Different Measurments and Inhibitory Potential against Angiotensin Ⅰ- Converting Enzyme of Protein Hydrolysates from Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) Seed Cake. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):169-175. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-7.

Correspondence to: Ping  Xu, Department of Tea Science, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, China. Email: zdxp@zju.edu.cn

Abstract

In the present study, protein hydrolysates derived from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed cake were prepared by using five different enzymes (alkaline protease, papain, trypsin, flavourzyme and neutral protease). The antioxidant activities and inhibition on angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) of the protein hydrolysates were evaluated in vitro. The results showed that hydrolysates derived from tea seed cake had remarkable antioxidant activities and inhibitory potential against ACE in vitro. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the antioxidant capacity and ACE inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates might be mainly due to the kind of the enzyme used, not to the degree of hydrolysis (DH) of hydrolysates.

Keywords

References

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Article

Changes in Quality Characteristics of Different Deep Frying Fats During Frying and Regeneration Potentials of Different Adsorbents in Wasted Frying Oils

1Food Engineering Department, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 176-181
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-8
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Yemiscioglu Fahri, Ozdikicierler Onur, Onder Ozge. Changes in Quality Characteristics of Different Deep Frying Fats During Frying and Regeneration Potentials of Different Adsorbents in Wasted Frying Oils. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):176-181. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-8.

Correspondence to: Ozdikicierler  Onur, Food Engineering Department, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey. Email: onur.ozdikicierler@ege.edu.tr

Abstract

Regeneration potentials of synthetic magnesium silicate, acid activated bleaching earth and natural bleaching earth for the fried soybean oil after progressive laboratory scale frying. The wasted palm olein and sunflower oils which were obtained from two different restaurants were investigated. As indication for development of deterioration reactions in oil during frying and regeneration potentials of so-called adsorbents, free fatty acid content (FFA), total polar material (TPM), dielectric constant (DC) and color measurement values (L, a and b) were measured. According to the results, synthetic magnesium silicate (SMS), acid activated bleaching earth (ABE) and natural bleaching earth (NBE) have different adsorbent characteristics that were significantly affected by the origin, physical and chemical properties and production method of that adsorbent. Laboratory scale frying operations were significantly increased FFA, TPM and DC as a result of thermal oxidation reaction. The usage of SMS in the wasted soybean oil reduced FFA content, TPM and DC values while lighten the color. Nevertheless, the reductions of these values were much more evident for in wasted sunflower oil from Restaurant A (WA) and wasted palm olein from Restaurant B (WB) when compared to wasted oil obtained from laboratory scale frying operations. All values were reduced with the use of adsorbents while L values of WB is increased with adsorbent usage. Generally SMS showed a higher reducing potential on FFA content, TPM and DC values which are considered as deterioration indices of oil quality during frying operation.

Keywords

References

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Article

Yerba Mate (Ilex Paraguariensis A. St. Hil) and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases

1Nutrition Department, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo-USP. Av Dr Arnaldo, 715, São Paulo, SP, 01246-904, Brazil

2Harvard College, Boston-MA, United States of America. 326 Cambridge St #410, Boston, MA 02114, USA


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 182-190
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-9
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Patricia de Moraes Pontilho MPH, Andrea Mariana Nunes da Costa Teixeira MPH, Caterina Yuan BSc, Liania Alves Luzia, Deborah Helena Markowicz Bastos, Patricia Helen Rondó. Yerba Mate (Ilex Paraguariensis A. St. Hil) and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):182-190. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-9.

Correspondence to: Liania  Alves Luzia, Nutrition Department, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo-USP. Av Dr Arnaldo, 715, São Paulo, SP, 01246-904, Brazil. Email: lianialuzia@usp.br

Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the main cause of death worldwide. Risk factors for CVDs include increased blood pressure, dyslipidemia, overweigh/obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Yerba Mate (YM) is an herbal preparation obtained from twigs and leaves of Ilex paraguariensis that seems to provide cardiovascular benefits, improving the lipid profile and preventing cholesterol oxidation. Considering that most of the drugs that have an impact on lipid profile, show several adverse effects, we aimed to review the benefits of YM in the prevention of CVDs, since the use of plant extracts has little or no side effects. The search included articles published up to September 2014, using the “PubMed” and “Food Science and Technology Abstracts-FSTA” databases with the descriptor Ilex paraguariensis. Two hundred and twenty six (226) and 132 articles were identified at PubMed and FSTA, respectively, but 71 were common for both databases. Given that only 1 article was obtained when the descriptors I. paraguariensis and cardio* were utilized in the search, the authors decided to read the 287 abstracts found in PubMed and FSTA databases. From those, 22 articles were eligible because they assessed the associations between I. paraguariensis, yerba mate (or its main compounds) and the following risk factors for CVDs: oxidative stress, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, overweight/obesity and T2DM. YM consumption apparently has antioxidant, vasodilation, cholesterol lowering, anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. However, the mechanism by which YM exerts these effects is still not clear. Thus, we advise future clinical trials using YM in humans at risk for CVDs.

Keywords

References

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Article

Nutritional and Functional Properties of Fruited Cream Cheese Spread as Influenced by Hydrocolloids

1National Institute of Food Science and Technology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-38040, Pakistan

2Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Sargodha, Sargodha-40100, Pakistan


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 191-195
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-10
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nabila Gulzar, Aysha Sameen, Muhammad Issa Khan, Nuzhat Huma, MianAnjum Murtaza, Saima Rafiq. Nutritional and Functional Properties of Fruited Cream Cheese Spread as Influenced by Hydrocolloids. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):191-195. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-10.

Correspondence to: MianAnjum Murtaza, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Sargodha, Sargodha-40100, Pakistan. Email: anjum_ft@yahoo.com

Abstract

Cream cheese is used as an ingredient in many foods. The objective of the study was to develop cream cheese spread with improved texture using apple puree (10%) and different hydrocolloids @ 2%. Seven fruited cream cheese spread samples were prepared. Cream cheese spread with no hydrocolloid was kept as control (CS). Three cheese spread samples were prepared by using pectin (CSP), gelatin () and carrageenan () alone and other three using different hydrocolloid in combination such as gelatin: carrageenan (CSGC), gelatin: pectin () and pectin: carrageenan (CSPC). Results demonstrated that (CSGC) showed better textural properties such as hardness (321.45 g) and viscosity (189.33cP). Sensory scores regarding compactness were also highest in CSGC as compared to others due to the combination of gelatin and carrageenan. Maximum water activity (0.76) was found in the CS while lowest water activity (0.72) was observed in the CSGC and CSPC. Sensory analysis indicated that graininess, sour taste, butter flavor and compactness were increased with storage of 60 days.

Keywords

References

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Article

Effects of Diallyl Disulfide in Elephant Garlic Extract on Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis in Mitochondrial Pathway

1Beijing Forestry University, College of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Beijing, P.R.China

2Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Beijing, P.R.China


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 196-201
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-11
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Xin An, Xiuhai Zhang, Hongjun Yao, Hongyang Li, Jianwu Ren. Effects of Diallyl Disulfide in Elephant Garlic Extract on Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis in Mitochondrial Pathway. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):196-201. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-11.

Correspondence to: Jianwu  Ren, Beijing Forestry University, College of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Beijing, P.R.China. Email: jianwur@sina.com

Abstract

As a close relative of garlic, elephant garlic contains abundant allicin, which means the extract of elephant garlic might induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells. The elephant garlic was extracted in alcohol with Solvent - Microwave Extraction. The main component was analyzed by liquid chromatography. The MCF-7 (michigan cancer foundation -7) cells were cultured in vitro. The apoptosis rate was determined with Annexin V-FITC/PI staining based flow cytometry (FCM). Mitochondrial transmembrane potential variation in the cells was observed with JC-1 probe and fluorescence confocal microscopy. Caspase-3 was determined with fluorescence Western Blot. The main component of alcohol extract of elephant garlic was Diallyl Disulfide (DADS), and its relative content was 17.04 %. The early apoptosis of MCF-7 cells could be induced by the alcohol extract solutions and it involved the activation of mitochondrial pathway. The results indicated that the extract and DADS standards exerted pro-apoptotic effects on breast cancer cells in a dose-response manner. From the results of fluorescence confocal microscopy, it showed that the Red/Green fluorescence ratio of mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells could be significantly decreased after inducing with DADS reference substances for 24 h. In addition, mitochondrial depolarization could be observed as adding the extract. The activated Caspase-3 was detected with Western Blot. It was demonstrated that the expression level of procaspase-3 had gone up with increased concentration of alcohol extract. The expression level was also increased with the treatment of DADS and the protein band was clear.

Keywords

References

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Article

Rutin Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Nitric Oxide Production in Macrophage Cells

1Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong, Korea

2Department of Food Science & Nutrition, Dong-A University, Busan, Korea

3Department of Pharmacology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea

4Department of Bioresources and Food Science, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 202-205
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-12
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Seung-Jae Lee, Seung Yuan Lee, Hyun Joo Ha, Seon Heui Cha, Si Kyung Lee, Sun Jin Hur. Rutin Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Nitric Oxide Production in Macrophage Cells. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):202-205. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-12.

Correspondence to: Sun  Jin Hur, Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong, Korea. Email: hursj@cau.ac.kr

Abstract

Rutin is the major polyphenol found in buckwheat and can downregulate inflammatory responses in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric synthase (iNOS) is closely correlated with inflammation and the pathology of a variety of diseases. It has been reported that rutin inhibited various pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokine signaling in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells, and suppressed the production of NO and the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and iNOS protein in LPS-stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that rutin exerts anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing the expression of COX-2 and iNOS in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Therefore, rutin can be considered as a functional food for the prevention of various diseases.

Keywords

References

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[3]  Lee, S.J., Kang, H.W., Lee, S.Y., and Hur, S.J., “Green tea polyphenol epifallocatechin-3-O-gallate attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in raw264.7 cells” J Food Nutr Res 2(7), 425-428. 2014.
 
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Article

In vitro Anti-angiogenic Effects of Tea Saponin and Tea Aglucone on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

1Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital/West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, P.R.China

2Department of Biopharmaceutics, Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery Systems, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, P.R. China

3College of Mathematics, Sichuan University, Chengdu, P.R. China


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(3), 206-212
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-13
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Xiaohong Li, Baozhan Huang, Fan Fei, Hai Niu, Wen Huang. In vitro Anti-angiogenic Effects of Tea Saponin and Tea Aglucone on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(3):206-212. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-3-13.

Correspondence to: Wen  Huang, Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital/West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, P.R.China. Email: niuhai@scu.edu.cn; huangwen@scu.edu.cn

Abstract

Green tea is a popular beverage world-wide, especially in Asian countries. Its health benefits, derived from the Camellia sinensis leaves, have been studied over the years. However, few reports are available about the health effects of tea saponin (TS), an important component of Camellia sinensis leaves, and tea aglucone (TA). In this present study, we investigated the effect of TS and TA on the proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). TS inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 7.5 ± 0.6 μM. Inconsistent with the well-reported mechanisms of apoptotic induction and cell cycle arrest by steroidal saponins, effects of TS on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in HUVECs were not detected. The autophagic vacuoles in the TS-treated HUVECs, observed with transmission electron microscopy, suggested the involvement of autophagic induction in the growth inhibition of HUVECs. When treated with TS, cell migration, invasion and tube formation potency of HUVECs were markedly suppressed. TA also suppressed the proliferation of HUVECs, with an IC50 of 25.3 ± 1.2 μM. In comparison with TS, TA inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs less effectively. Our data about the anti-angiogenic effects of TS and TA, presented for the first time, would provide a new insight into the health potential for green tea.

Keywords

References

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