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Article

Upper Frequency Limit of Hearing – A New Screening Method or an Illusion?

1Department of Occupational Diseases and Toxicology Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Poland

2Department of Laboratory Diagnostics and Clinical Biochemistry Medical University of Lodz, Poland


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013, 1(3), 31-35
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M. Bak, K. Rosniak-Bak. Upper Frequency Limit of Hearing – A New Screening Method or an Illusion?. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013; 1(3):31-35. doi: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-1.

Correspondence to: M. Bak, Department of Occupational Diseases and Toxicology Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Poland. Email: bm@imp.lodz.pl

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop a prototype generator with electro-acoustical connection, verify the parameters of the new apparatus, perform clinical trials in patients with normal hearing. A digital oscilloscope and artificial ear were used to check electrical and sound parameters. Sound intensity in the 0.5-20 kHz frequency range was 86.8 ± 9 dB SPL. This was followed by clinical trials involving 44 volunteers (17 men and 27 women) with an average age of 20. Before the experiment, each volunteer was examined by audiological tests to rule out damage to the auditory pathway. The upper frequency limit of hearing procedure consisted of binaural administration of constant-intensity signal with a frequency smoothly varying within the 20 kHz - 0.5 kHz range. The volunteer was told to release a signaling button when he heard the acoustic signal. At that moment, the generator stopped at a given frequency that was displayed on a digital scale unit. The test procedure was repeated three times in each subject and the arithmetic mean of three measurements was used in further analysis. The entire procedure, both technical and clinical, was conducted in an audiometric silent chamber, in which it was possible to control the acoustic conditions. Comparison of results of a prototype apparatus to the results obtained in previously research showed that the developed apparatus specifications meet their objectives. In clinical studies, the upper frequency limit of hearing results were as follows: in the group of 17 people only one person was below 75 percentile, two were at 75 percentile, ten at 50 percentile, and four were at 25 percentile. The results show that the modification of the apparatus involving the use of less expensive components has allowed to obtain the technical parameters and results comparable to the others authors and, therefore, the apparatus built by the author of this paper may be used as a screening apparatus.

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References

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Article

A Review on Wearable Tri-Axial Accelerometer Based Fall Detectors

1MTech, Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore, India


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013, 1(3), 36-39
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sharwari Kulkarni, Mainak Basu. A Review on Wearable Tri-Axial Accelerometer Based Fall Detectors. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013; 1(3):36-39. doi: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-2.

Correspondence to: Sharwari  Kulkarni, MTech, Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore, India. Email: sharwari24@gmail.com

Abstract

Falling is the crucial concern in elder adults which can result into serious injury or rupture of bones especially hip bone injury or other joint fractures. Hence fall detection is necessary to minimize risk of injury. Accelerometer is the most widely used device to detect falls as it provides information about the sudden downward tilt. Tri-axial accelerometer provides measure of acceleration in three dimensions. Paper describes the review on fall detectors in which tri-axial accelerometer is used as the main component along with different sensors and systems.

Keywords

References

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Article

Brain Tumour Detection

1Department of Informatics, Faculty of Management Science and Informatics, University of Žilina, Žilina, Slovakia


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013, 1(3), 40-49
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Michal Kvet, Karol Matiaško. Brain Tumour Detection. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013; 1(3):40-49. doi: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-3.

Correspondence to: Michal  Kvet, Department of Informatics, Faculty of Management Science and Informatics, University of Žilina, Žilina, Slovakia. Email: Michal.Kvet@fri.uniza.sk

Abstract

Cancers are the most serious problems of the medicine. Adequate treatment of early diagnosed patient gives the patient possibility of healing, to improve the quality of life and to return to normal life. Most of the tumors are characterized by the presence of one or several more or less specific markers. By processing the presence of multiple markers - although with a lower sensitivity and specificity - we get an overall picture of the body organs. The aim of this project is to monitor, evaluate and process results of magnetic resonance imaging. The results are provided to doctors in the form of graphs, 2D and 3D models and tables. This application also brings the possibility of processing error values of the measurements of markers.

Keywords

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Article

Exogenous Factors Capable of Enhancing Mesenchymal-origin Cell Proliferation in vitro: Promising Applications in Large Scale Cell-bioprocess Development

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013, 1(3), 50-60
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Partha S. Saha. Exogenous Factors Capable of Enhancing Mesenchymal-origin Cell Proliferation in vitro: Promising Applications in Large Scale Cell-bioprocess Development. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2013; 1(3):50-60. doi: 10.12691/jbet-1-3-4.

Correspondence to: Partha  S. Saha, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium. Email: p.s.saha.11@aberdeen.ac.uk

Abstract

Musculoskeletal damage is a major health-related problem in working groups as well as in growing age population throughout the world. Due to the inefficiency of the current surgical treatment, Regenerative Medicine has recently grasped the attention of scientists. Tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies, two prominent branches of Regenerative Medicine, are considered as the most suitable techniques to repair the tissue damage. However, a huge number of autologous cells are required to address these practices. Since only small numbers of cells are obtainable from the patient, it requires expansion of cells in vitro. Nevertheless, these primary cells grow slowly in vitro and lose their general characteristics during prolonged culturing period. It has been shown through this thesis that several exogenous factors, which can be classified as physical, chemical, biological and culture-environmental, can modulate the culture parameters effectively. These can, therefore, support in promoting higher proliferation rate and also in maintaining the desired characteristics after the culturing period.

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Article

Interaction of Mobile Telephone Radiation with Biological Systems in Veterinary and Medicine

1Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tabriz, Tabriz-Iran

2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz, Iran


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014, 2(1), 1-4
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-2-1-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ezzatollah Fathi, Raheleh Farahzadi. Interaction of Mobile Telephone Radiation with Biological Systems in Veterinary and Medicine. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014; 2(1):1-4. doi: 10.12691/jbet-2-1-1.

Correspondence to: Raheleh  Farahzadi, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz, Iran. Email: r.farahzadi@iaut.ac.ir

Abstract

Every day, we’re swimming in a sea of electromagnetic radiation produced by electrical appliances, power lines, wiring in buildings, and a group of other technologies that are part of modern life. Cell phones have become a vital part of our lives, and its use is not only restricted to voice conversations but also conveying news, high resolution pictures and internet. During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential health risks from extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and radiofrequency/microwave radiation emissions. It is fairly well established that at sufficiently high power levels, radiofrequency and microwave energy can produce deleterious biological effects. Some investigations suggested that these fields may have genotoxic effects and may increase the risk of several cancers and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this review was to evaluate the influence of mobile telephone radiation on biological systems and health. It is concluded that these fields can influence several biological functions of cells and tissues, modulating intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and the cell cycle progression.

Keywords

References

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Article

Protection of Human Health by Low Cost Treatment in Rural Area

1Department of Chemical Engineering, NIT Raipur India


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014, 2(1), 5-9
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-2-1-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jigar Joshi, Omprakash Sahu. Protection of Human Health by Low Cost Treatment in Rural Area. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014; 2(1):5-9. doi: 10.12691/jbet-2-1-2.

Correspondence to: Omprakash  Sahu, Department of Chemical Engineering, NIT Raipur India. Email: ops0121@gmail.com

Abstract

Arsenic is most abundant element on the Earth and found in groundwater in both + (III) and + (V) oxidation states. If taken in sufficient quantities, arsenic can pose a threat to human health. In the rural area without awareness or high treatment cost it can consumed directly by local people. To reduce the effect on arsenic on drinking water medicated natural occurring plant seed is used for removal of toxic substance. In this study Moringa oleifera is used as coagulant material to reduce the toxicity of drinking water. Moringa oleifera is that seed which proved and optimized this problem in rural area. It can be reduced 91% of arsenic and 93% of hardness from drinking water.

Keywords

References

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[3]  Murphy, T. and Guo, J., 2003. An introduction to arsenic toxicity and its management, Aquatic arsenic toxicity and treatment. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, The Netherlands, 7-14.
 
[4]  Narasimhan, R., Thomson, B., Chwirka, J. and Lowry, J., 2005. Chemistry and Treatment of Arsenic in Drinking Water. American Water Works Association Research Foundation.
 
[5]  Yang, C.Y., Chang, C.C., Tsai, S.S. and Chuang, H.Y., 2003. Arsenic in drinking water and adverse pregnancy outcome in an arsenic-endemic area in northeastern Taiwan. Environ. Res., 91: 29-34.
 
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[7]  Dubey NK, Kumar R, Tripathi P (2004). Global promotion of herbal medicine: India’s opportunity. Curr. Sci. 86: 37-41.
 
[8]  Arora DS, Kaur J (1999). Antimicrobial activity of spices. Int. J. antimicrob. Ag. 12: 257-262.
 
[9]  Rojas JJ, Ochoa VJ, Ocampo SA, Munoz JF (2006). Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections. BMC Complement. Altern. Med. 6: 2.
 
[10]  Arora DS, Kaur GJ, Kaur H (2009). Antibacterial activity of tea and coffee: their extracts and preparations. Int. J. Food Prop. 12: 286-294.
 
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[14]  Ndabigengesere, A., Narasiah, K.S. 1998 Quality of Water Treated by Coagulation Using Moringa oleifera seeds”, Water Research, 32 (3): 781-791.
 
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[17]  Samanta, G., Clifford, D.A., 2005. Preservation of inorganic arsenic species in groundwater. Environ. Sci. Technol. 39 (22), 8877-8882.
 
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Article

Vessel Deformation Modeling- Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

1Philips HealthCare, Research Scholar Manipal University, Philips Innovation campus, Bangalore, India

2Philips IP&S, Philips Innovation campus, Bangalore, India

3Philips Research, Philips Innovation campus, Bangalore, India


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014, 2(2), 10-12
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-2-2-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Y. Kiran Kumar, Sashi. B. Mehta, Manjunath Ramachandra. Vessel Deformation Modeling- Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014; 2(2):10-12. doi: 10.12691/jbet-2-2-1.

Correspondence to: Y.  Kiran Kumar, Philips HealthCare, Research Scholar Manipal University, Philips Innovation campus, Bangalore, India. Email: Kiran.kumary@philips.com

Abstract

Cerebrovascular abnormalities are extremely complex, due to the multitude of factors acting simultaneously on cerebral hemodynamics. Cerebral Arterio Venous Malformation (CAVM) hemodynamic in one of the vascular abnormality condition results changes in the flow and pressure level in blood vessels. This can cause rupture or decreased blood supply to the tissue through capillary causing infarct. Measuring flow and pressure without intervention along the vessel is big challenge due to occlusion, bending and thinning of the vessel in Arteriovenous Malformation patients. In this paper, we proposed a lumped model for the Vessels Deformation in CAVM Structures that will help clinicians to find the pressure and velocity measurements non-invasively.

Keywords

References

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[2]  Review of Zero-D and 1-D Models of Blood Flow in the Cardiovascular System Yubing Shi, Patricia Lawford, and Rodney Hose, Biomed Eng Online. 2011; 10: 33.
 
[3]  Can Induction of Systemic Hypotension Help Prevent Nidus Rupture Complicating Arteriovenous Malformation Embolization?: Analysis of Underlying Mechanisms Achieved Using a Theoretical Model, Tarik F. Massoud, George J. Hademenos, William L. Young, Erzhen Gao, and John Pile-Spellman, AJNR Am J Neuroradiology 21:1255-1267, August 2000.
 
[4]  Modelling cerebral hemodynamics: a move towards predictive surgery, Edlong, March 9, 2007, Thesis Report.
 
[5]  Theoretical modelling of arteriovenous malformation rupture risk: a feasibility and validation study,. Erzhen Gao a, William L. Young, a Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA, b Department of Anesthesiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA, IPEM, 1998.
 
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[6]  Can Induction of Systemic Hypotension Help Prevent Nidus Rupture Complicating Arteriovenous Malformation Embolization?: Analysis of Underlying Mechanisms Achieved Using a Theoretical Model, Tarik F. Massoud, George J. Hademenos, AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 21: 1255-1267, August 2000.
 
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Article

Online Frequency Domain Volterra Model of Glucose-Insulin Process in Type-1 Diabetics

1Department of Electrical Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah, India


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014, 2(2), 13-20
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-2-2-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
A. Bhattacharjee, A. Sutradhar. Online Frequency Domain Volterra Model of Glucose-Insulin Process in Type-1 Diabetics. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014; 2(2):13-20. doi: 10.12691/jbet-2-2-2.

Correspondence to: A.  Bhattacharjee, Department of Electrical Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah, India. Email: arpita.bhattacharjee3@gmail.com

Abstract

Modern close loop control for blood glucose level in a diabetic patient necessarily uses an explicit model of the process. A fixed parameter full order or reduced order model does not characterize the inter-patient and intra-patient parameter variability. This paper deals with an online frequency domain kernel estimation method for modeling a nonlinear dynamic system of multivariable glucose-insulin process in a type-1 diabetic patient that captures the process dynamics in presence of uncertainties and parameter variations. The present work proposes a frequency domain kernel estimation of a Volterra model using the harmonic excitation input by taking FFT on the input data sequence from the glucose-insulin process of the patient. Volterra equations up to second order kernels with extended input vector for Volterra model are solved online by adaptive recursive least square (ARLS) algorithm. Twice the length of the extended input vector for the glucose-insulin process is considered for finding the frequency domain kernels that can be directly used as the Volterra transfer function and are useful for closed loop internal model control. The input-output data taken from the 19th order first principle model of the patient in intravenous route, have been used to identify the system with a short filter memory length of M=2 and the validation results have shown good fit both in frequency and time domain responses with nominal patient as well as with intrapatient parameter variations.

Keywords

References

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Article

Low Cost Angular Displacement Sensors for Biomechanical Applications - A Review

1CP 400641, B-dul Muncii, No. 103-105, A022, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

2Dublin 9, CLARITY: Centre for Sensor Web Technologies, Dublin City University, Ireland


Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014, 2(2), 21-28
DOI: 10.12691/jbet-2-2-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Emőke Szelitzky, Jogile Kuklyte, Dan Mândru, Noel O’Connor. Low Cost Angular Displacement Sensors for Biomechanical Applications - A Review. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. 2014; 2(2):21-28. doi: 10.12691/jbet-2-2-3.

Correspondence to: Emőke  Szelitzky, CP 400641, B-dul Muncii, No. 103-105, A022, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Email: szatmari_emoke@yahoo.com

Abstract

In the general scientific quest for increased quality of life a natural ambition is to know more about human body kinematics. Varied knowledge can be extracted from sensors placed on human body and through associated biomechanical parameter evaluation the causal connection between different biomechanical parameters and medical conditions can be inferred. From a biomechanical point of view, one of the most important parameters within the human body is the amplitude of angular movements of joints. Although many angular sensors are used in industry, particular characteristics such as small size, flexibility and appropriate attachment methods must be taken into consideration when estimating the amplitude of movement of human joints. This paper reviews the existing low cost easy to manipulate angular sensors listed in the scientific literature, which currently are or could be used in rehabilitation engineering, physiotherapy or biomechanical evaluations in sport. The review is carried out in terms of a classification based on the sensors’ working principles and includes resistive, capacitive, magnetic and piezoresistive sensors.

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