Journal of Aquatic Science

ISSN (Print): ISSN Pending

ISSN (Online): ISSN Pending

Editor-in-Chief: Hanaa Abd El Baky

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/JAS

   

Article

Occupational Hazards and Injuries Associated with Fish Processing in Nigeria

1Agricultural Media Resources and Extension Centre University of Agriculture, P.M.B 2240, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria

2Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries Management University of Agriculture, P.M.B 2240, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria


Journal of Aquatic Science. 2015, 3(1), 1-5
doi: 10.12691/jas-3-1-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
OLAOYE. O. J., ODEBIYI. O. C., ABIMBOLA. O. T.. Occupational Hazards and Injuries Associated with Fish Processing in Nigeria. Journal of Aquatic Science. 2015; 3(1):1-5. doi: 10.12691/jas-3-1-1.

Correspondence to: OLAOYE.  O. J., Agricultural Media Resources and Extension Centre University of Agriculture, P.M.B 2240, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria. Email: olaoyejacob@yahoo.co.nz

Abstract

Fish processing, the activities associated with fish and fish products between the time fish are caught or harvested, and the time the final product is delivered to the customer; is fraught with potential hazards and risks which are categorized into occupational, environmental, food safety and public health. This paper reviewed major hazards, injuries and risks associated with the fish processing industry in Nigeria. It further proffered strategies for their management and control. Fish industry stakeholders should therefore ensure that guidelines and policies which promote an environmentally friendly and sustainable industry are instituted and enforced.

Keywords

References

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Article

Isolated Wetlands: Assessing Their Values & Functions

1Lamar University, United States


Journal of Aquatic Science. 2015, 3(1), 6-13
doi: 10.12691/jas-3-1-2
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mamta Singh. Isolated Wetlands: Assessing Their Values & Functions. Journal of Aquatic Science. 2015; 3(1):6-13. doi: 10.12691/jas-3-1-2.

Correspondence to: Mamta  Singh, Lamar University, United States. Email: mamtasingh1328@gmail.com

Abstract

Isolated wetlands are as valuable as non-isolated wetlands when it comes to ecological functions and values. Wetlands perform a variety of functions including flood regulation, nutrient and carbon storage, and provision of plant and animal habitat. Although the present literature supports this claim, it is also clear that much scientific works needs to be done on isolated wetlands, especially in the area of hydrology, and hydraulic connectivity and nutrient retention. Wetlands should be judged on the basis of values and functions they perform and not on the vague notion of isolation. Their loss or destruction will have significant ecological consequences on the wider biotic community.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Daily Light-dark Cycle of Photosynthetic Oxygen Evolution in Three Species of Tropical Calcareous Algae

1Marine Biology Section, University of San Carlos, Cebu City, Philippines


Journal of Aquatic Science. 2015, 3(1), 14-18
doi: 10.12691/jas-3-1-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Alvin P. Monotilla, Serafin M. Geson, Paul Isaac O. Dizon, Danilo T. Dy. The Daily Light-dark Cycle of Photosynthetic Oxygen Evolution in Three Species of Tropical Calcareous Algae. Journal of Aquatic Science. 2015; 3(1):14-18. doi: 10.12691/jas-3-1-3.

Correspondence to: Alvin  P. Monotilla, Marine Biology Section, University of San Carlos, Cebu City, Philippines. Email: alvinmonotilla@yahoo.co.jp

Abstract

Endogenous coordination between light, temperature and other factors by different species of algae would be vital in the production of several proteins needed for growth and adaptations, and therefore will affect their productivity. Among plant activities that are governed by daily light-dark cycles (i.e. 12L:12D and 12L:12L) among calcareous algae (Halimeda simulans, Mastophora rosea and Padina australis) were conducted by monitoring the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration inside incubating bottles with algal samples for 24h and the features of the resulting DO curves were determined by measuring the number of pixel under the curve through image analysis. There was no significant difference among algae during the initial 12L:12D cycle suggesting their normal response to light-dark cycles. However, after six days under continuous light, M. rosea showed a significant decrease in the DO curve (lesser number of pixel under the curve) compared to DO curves during the initial 12L:12D cycle. The decrease in the DO concentration during the continuous L:L treatments might be attributed to the photoinhibitory effect of the red alga being less adoptive to subsequent high intensities. Although an increase in DO concentrations is expected with continuous light, not all algae responded to it. Only Padina exhibited circadian rhythm in our 24h observation under continuous light.

Keywords

References

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