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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Editor-in-Chief: Freddie W. Litton

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

   

Article

The Effect of Problem-Based Learning Model (PBL) and Adversity Quotient (AQ) on Problem-Solving Ability

1Post Graduate, State University of Medan, Medan, Indonesia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2017, 5(2), 179-183
doi: 10.12691/education-5-2-11
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sahyar, Rika Yulia Fitri. The Effect of Problem-Based Learning Model (PBL) and Adversity Quotient (AQ) on Problem-Solving Ability. American Journal of Educational Research. 2017; 5(2):179-183. doi: 10.12691/education-5-2-11.

Correspondence to:  Sahyar, Post Graduate, State University of Medan, Medan, Indonesia. Email: sahyar@unimed.ac.id

Abstract

This study aimed to analyze whether the result of students’ problem-solving ability with using problem-based learning model better than conventional learning, to analyze the results of problem-solving ability of students who have high average of adversity quotient better than students who have low average of adversity quotient, to find out interaction between problem-based learning model mapping and adversity quotient of students' problem-solving ability. Two class of students namely; problem-based learning class and conventional learning class were investigated on student’s problem-solving ability. The results showed that: problem-solving ability of students used problem-based learning model better than conventional learning, problem-solving ability of students who have high average of adversity quotient better than students who have the low average of adversity quotient, and there was interaction between the problem-based learning model and conventional learning with adversity quotient to improve students' problem-solving ability.

Keywords

References

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Article

A Model for Assessing the Development of HOT Skills in Students

1Computer Science Department Al Qasemi Academic College of Education, Baqa El-Gharbieh, Israel


American Journal of Educational Research. 2017, 5(2), 184-188
doi: 10.12691/education-5-2-12
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jamal Raiyn, Oleg Tilchin. A Model for Assessing the Development of HOT Skills in Students. American Journal of Educational Research. 2017; 5(2):184-188. doi: 10.12691/education-5-2-12.

Correspondence to: Jamal  Raiyn, Computer Science Department Al Qasemi Academic College of Education, Baqa El-Gharbieh, Israel. Email: raiyn@qsm.ac.il

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a dynamic model for building a framework for the adaptive, complex assessment of developing the higher-order thinking (HOT) skills in students. Adaptability is provided by the dynamics of instructor assessment taking into account the development of HOT skills and providing a flexible choice of instructional problems for students. The complexity of the assessment is provided by initial, formative, adaptive and summative assessments of HOT skills. The proposed coefficients for HOT skill development serve as a constructive means of evaluating developing HOT skills in students. The creation of the model includes the elaboration and integration of interconnected model components. The dynamics of the model are provided by changes in its parameters, which express the dynamic process of assessment. The model involves the following assessment components: initial, formative, adaptive, and summative (SIFA). It fosters the development of HOT skills by adapting the assessment of HOT skills to the dynamics of the problem solving process.

Keywords

References

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Article

Developing and Evaluating Elementary-Level Teaching Materials “Magnetic Top”: An Analysis of Questionnaire Using Text Mining

1Kitauwa High School, Japan

2Shiga University, Japan

3Kanazawa Nishikioka High School, Japan

4Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Japan


American Journal of Educational Research. 2017, 5(2), 189-195
doi: 10.12691/education-5-2-13
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Takekuni Yamaoka, Kimihito Takeno, Shinichi Okino, Shinji Matsumoto. Developing and Evaluating Elementary-Level Teaching Materials “Magnetic Top”: An Analysis of Questionnaire Using Text Mining. American Journal of Educational Research. 2017; 5(2):189-195. doi: 10.12691/education-5-2-13.

Correspondence to: Takekuni  Yamaoka, Kitauwa High School, Japan. Email: yamaoka.takek@gmail.com

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to create and evaluate an educational magnetic top. The experiment was conducted with elementary school children at the Youngsters’ Science Festival in Matsuyama, Japan. In order to evaluate the study, an open-ended questionnaire was created. Upon receiving permission from parents, 139 elementary school children were surveyed, which included 56 students from the lower grades, 54 students from the middle grades, and 29 students from the upper grades. The survey was analyzed using the text mining technique. As a result, three important results were gathered: 1) it became clear that most students in the middle grades stop feeling like they were bad at the screw tightening; and 2) Most students in the upper grades that had experience in motor learning, students tended to be able to adequately explain the principle of screw tightening; and 3) As long as students learn about the principles of motors, the teaching materials that are proposed in this study can be used to describe complex principles to students in all elementary school grade levels.

Keywords

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[5]  Yamaoka, T., Shirahama, H., Matsumoto, S.. Development and Evaluation of Teaching Materials for Elementary School Students Using LED - An Analysis of Questionnaires Using Text mining, Japan Association of Energy and Environmental Education, Vol.10, No.1, 3-9, 2016.
 
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