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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Editor-in-Chief: Freddie W. Litton

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

Google-based Impact Factor: 1.27   Citations

Article

Understanding Factors Affecting Performance in an Elementary Biostatistics Course at Harare Institute of Technology

1Department of Mathematics, Harare Institute of Technology, Harare, Zimbabwe


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(6), 479-483
doi: 10.12691/education-4-6-6
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kudakwashe Mutangi. Understanding Factors Affecting Performance in an Elementary Biostatistics Course at Harare Institute of Technology. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(6):479-483. doi: 10.12691/education-4-6-6.

Correspondence to: Kudakwashe  Mutangi, Department of Mathematics, Harare Institute of Technology, Harare, Zimbabwe. Email: kmutangi@email.com

Abstract

Different factors affecting academic performance of students in biostatistics at Harare Institute of Technology were considered. A questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection and was distributed to all students who had done the biostatistics course and were present on campus. Coursework marks were used as a measure of performance. Factors considered in this investigation were age of students, gender, high school achievement, lecture attendance, type of accommodation, time spend studying the course per week, family income, birth order, family size, achievement in ordinary (O’Level) and advanced level (A’Level) maths and the student’s studying method. The students were also asked to rate the knowledge of the lecturer and give suggestions on how the pass rate in biostatistics could be improved. A stepwise regression method was used to select those factors linearly correlated with coursework which significantly affected performance. Chi-squared tests were used to check the association between categorical variables while correlations were used to assess linear relationships between quantitative variables. Results from stepwise regression indicated that high school achievement (number of points at A’Level) affected performance. Age of students and gender were associated with performance.

Keywords

References

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Article

Undergraduates and Interest in Doing Research: Study Based on Bachelor of Commerce Undergraduates

1Department of Commerce, Faculty of Management Studies and Commerce, University of Sri Jayewardenepura


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(6), 484-487
doi: 10.12691/education-4-6-7
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Vilani Sachitra. Undergraduates and Interest in Doing Research: Study Based on Bachelor of Commerce Undergraduates. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(6):484-487. doi: 10.12691/education-4-6-7.

Correspondence to: Vilani  Sachitra, Department of Commerce, Faculty of Management Studies and Commerce, University of Sri Jayewardenepura. Email: vilani3164@gmail.com

Abstract

Scholarly components are more essential to the modern tertiary education, especially concern on management studies. Research competence is very important in relating to apply obtained knowledge in creative ways and create new knowledge. Current market requirements require at least minimum research competencies in order to endure the changes in technological and human resource. In recent times it has been identified that undergraduates’ interest towards engaging with a research is getting declined. The main intention of the study is to investigate the effect of beliefs, self-efficacy, attitudes, and motivation on undergraduates' interests in doing research. The present study is of exploratory and descriptive in nature. One hundred and eighty undergraduates from Department of Commerce who had already completed research methodology course unit were participated in the study. All students were invited to voluntary participation to answer the structured questions. Undergraduates’ responses were analyzed through mean comparison using SPSS version 21. Undergraduates believe research as stressful, complicated and difficult task, and generally they have negative attitudes towards research. Since they have knowledge and skill required to do research, language barrier and lack of academic support need to be conquered.

Keywords

References

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Article

SWOT Analysis on the Development of MOOC in China's Higher Education

1College of Computer Science, Yangtze University, No.1 Nanhuan Road, Jingzhou, China

2Yangtze University College of Technology & Engineering, No.85 Xueyuan Road, Jingzhou, China


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(6), 488-490
doi: 10.12691/education-4-6-8
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Huan Cheng-lin, Chen Jian-wei. SWOT Analysis on the Development of MOOC in China's Higher Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(6):488-490. doi: 10.12691/education-4-6-8.

Correspondence to: Chen  Jian-wei, Yangtze University College of Technology & Engineering, No.85 Xueyuan Road, Jingzhou, China. Email: webhcl@sina.com

Abstract

In recent years, MOOC has become a global innovative movement in education, also caught the attention of the higher education in china. Some traditional universities have joined MOOC movement and cooperated with foreign MOOC platforms and domestic internet enterprises to provide MOOC and translated some MOOCs into Chinese to meet the domestic learning demand. Facing the MOOC movement, colleges and universities must re-examine their own positioning according to the actual situation to choose the corresponding development countermeasure. This paper will conduct SWOT analysis on the conditions of developing MOOC in higher education of china in order to provide policy reference.

Keywords

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