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Article

Improving the Parentally Deprived Children’s Quality of Life in Ukraine (Based on the British Experience)

1Department of Social Work and Social Pedagogy, Foreign Language Department, Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University at Cherkasy, Ukraine


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12B), 70-77
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12B-13
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
N.V. Martovytska. Improving the Parentally Deprived Children’s Quality of Life in Ukraine (Based on the British Experience). American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12B):70-77. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12B-13.

Correspondence to: N.V.  Martovytska, Department of Social Work and Social Pedagogy, Foreign Language Department, Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University at Cherkasy, Ukraine. Email: nv_mart@mail.ru

Abstract

The thesis highlights social protection of orphans and children deprived of parental care in and in . It is stated that social policy in is aimed at searching effective forms of placements for orphans and children deprived of parental care. Adoption, family care, foster care and with biological family reunion are supported by current British social policy. Classification of British foster families based on the principles of time, the category of addressees, content and conditions of receiving are developed. The objective possibility of British social protection experience of orphans and children deprived of parental care transformation to Ukrainian welfare system is defined and substantiated. The comparative analysis of basic mechanisms of social protection of orphans and children deprived of parental care in the and is explored. The implementation of some progressive aspects of orphans and children deprived of parental care welfare in the into social and educational work of is offered. The following aspects of child welfare system may be implemented in Ukraine: different types of family forms of accommodation (according to the needs of a child), children hearing system, motivation of foster families creation and kinds of foster parents support.

Keywords

References

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[3]  Alekseenko, S., Aksyonova, O., Vakulenko, N., State Report on the Situation of Children in Ukraine (by end of 2010.), Ministry of Social Policy in Ukraine, State Institute of Family and Youth Policy, Кyiv, 195, 2011.
 
[4]  Alekseenko, Т. F., Laktionova, G. М,   Prytysk, G. О. at al., Book for Parents. A Guide for Foster Parents’ Training, Science World, Кyiv, 2006, 496.
 
[5]  Aleksenko, G.G., Social Protection of Orphans and Children Deprived of Parental Care, Juridical Portal, 2011. [E-book] Available: http://pravotoday.in.ua/ua/press-centre/publications/pub-602.
 
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[7]  Bevz, G.M., Foster Family: Social and Psychological Dimensions, Publishing House “Word”, Кyiv, 2010, 352.
 
[8]  Bezpalko, O.V., Social Work in the Community, the Center of Textbooks, Кyiv, 2005, 176.
 
[9]  Bohdanova, I., Social Pedagogy, Knowledge, Кyiv, 2008, 343.
 
[10]  Brown R. Safeguarding children statistics: the availability and comparability of data in the UK, Department for Education, London: Great Britain., 2011, 20.
 
[11]  Department for Education, Children Looked After in England (Including Adoption and Care Leavers) Year Ending 31 March 2011, DfE, London, 2011.
 
[12]  Dybaylo, V. World Practice: Supporting Young People Who are Leaving Institutional Care, Children Rights, Kyiv, 2 (10), 2010.
 
[13]  Jordan L., Special Guardianship: What Does It Offer Children Who Cannot Live With Their Parents?, Family Rights Group, London, 2006, 114.
 
[14]  Kent, R. The children's safeguards review, The Stationery Office, Edinburgh, 1997.
 
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[16]  Kutorzhevska, L., Preparing Future Teachers to Work at Secondary Schools for Orphans Кyiv, 2004, 21.
 
[17]  Martovytska, N. “Development and Prospects of Improving the System of Institutional Facilities for Orphans and Children Deprived of Parental Care in the UK,” Journal of Cherkassy University, 20 (231), 18-27, 2011.
 
[18]  Martovytska, N.,Effective Forms of Care for Orphans and Children Deprived of Parental Care (the Experience of the UK),” Journal of Cherkassy University, 183(4), 97-103, 2010.
 
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Article

Incorporating Inquiry Investigation into Language Arts Curriculum

1Far Eastern Federal University, Department of Regional and International Studies, Russia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12B), 78-82
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12B-14
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Irina Lazareva. Incorporating Inquiry Investigation into Language Arts Curriculum. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12B):78-82. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12B-14.

Correspondence to: Irina  Lazareva, Far Eastern Federal University, Department of Regional and International Studies, Russia. Email: lazar_irina@mail.ru

Abstract

The article includes methodological and practical applications for improving Foreign Language students’ performance through incorporating inquiry investigation. The key to high-quality performance is found in systematicity and systematization of interrogative practice included in the mini-course on elementary research skills building. Question-and-answer method is presented from the vantage point of learner-centered approach promoting assistance in moving through the stages of disciplined inquiry, nurturing research competence and the culture of learning the World.

Keywords

References

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Article

Rebranding Ukrainian Generations and Generation Y through the Prism of Modern Views

1Bohdan Khmelnytskyy National University of Cherkasy, Ukraine


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12B), 83-86
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12B-15
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Anatoliy Kuzminskyy. Rebranding Ukrainian Generations and Generation Y through the Prism of Modern Views. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12B):83-86. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12B-15.

Correspondence to: Anatoliy  Kuzminskyy, Bohdan Khmelnytskyy National University of Cherkasy, Ukraine. Email: ntaras7@ukr.net

Abstract

The article offers a short survey of the Ukrainian generations of 1900 through 2000. It details on the main features of the epoch and the environment in which generation Y was formed. The author specifies on the generation born in 1983 – 2003 and connects it with the peculiar features of the “millennials”’ entry into higher education.

Keywords

References

[1]  Grenier, A. Crossing age and generational boundaries: Exploring intergenerational research encounters, Journal of Social Issues 63 (4): 718, 2007, Available: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-4560.2007.00532.x/abstract;jsessionid=FA4114020A67ED770547C114ABF1E757
 
[2]  Hoover, E. (11 October 2009), “The Millennial Muddle”. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved 12 August 2014, Available: http://chronicle.com/article/The-Millennial-Muddle-How/48772.
 
[3]  Horovitz, B. (May 4, 2012). After Gen X, Millennials, what should next generation be?, USA Today. Retrieved August 16, 2014, Available: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/advertising/story/2012-05-03/naming-the-next-generation/54737518/1.
 
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Article

Preface

1Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12C), 0-0
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12C-0
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Carlos Eduardo de Carvalho Vargas. Preface. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12C):0-0. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12C-0.

Correspondence to: Carlos  Eduardo de Carvalho Vargas, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. Email: carlos.vargas@ibge.gov.br

Abstract

References

[1]  Bastos, C., Gava, G., Vargas, C. Jerry Fodor and the Reinterpretation of the Phrenological Model. Special Issue on Philosophy of education: contemporary perspectives, American Journal of Educational Research, Newark, Forthcoming Edition, 2015.
 
[2]  Gava, G. The Philosophy of Distance Education. Special Issue on Philosophy of education: contemporary perspectives, American Journal of Educational Research, Newark, Forthcoming Edition, 2015.
 
[3]  Hunt, J. From Western English to Global English: Issues in Cultural and Pragmatic Instruction. Special Issue on Philosophy of education: contemporary perspectives, American Journal of Educational Research, Newark, Forthcoming Edition, 2015.
 
[4]  Vargas, C. Project for Implementation of the Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment Programme in Adult Literacy. Special Issue on Philosophy of education: contemporary perspectives, American Journal of Educational Research, Newark, Forthcoming Edition, 2015.
 

Article

The Philosophy of Distance Education

1Core Human Formation, Positivo University Online, Curitiba, Brazil


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12C), 1-3
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12C-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Gustavo Luiz Gava. The Philosophy of Distance Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12C):1-3. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12C-1.

Correspondence to: Gustavo  Luiz Gava, Core Human Formation, Positivo University Online, Curitiba, Brazil. Email: gustavoluizgava@hotmail.com

Abstract

It is understood that the digital era is one of the major transitions to situate philosophy and other disciplines, in the virtual world: online teaching. Moreover, from there, enabling the student to include himself in his worldly field: cognitive virtual to the actual goal. A reverse engineering knowledge.

Keywords

References

[1]  Deleuze, G, Guattari, F, What is philosophy? Columbia University Press, New York, 2003.
 
[2]  Gardner, H,. Changing minds: the art and science of changing our own and other people’s minds. Harvard Business School Press, Boston, 2008.
 
[3]  Halévy, M, A era do conhecimento: princípios e reflexões sobre a revolução noética no século XXI. Editora Unesp, São Paulo, 2010.
 
[4]  Palloff, R, Pratt, K, The virtual student: a profile and guide to working with online learners. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 2003.
 
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Article

From Western English to Global English: Issues in Cultural and Pragmatic Instruction

1Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Cavite, Philippines


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12C), 4-7
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12C-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Josiah Gabriel Hunt. From Western English to Global English: Issues in Cultural and Pragmatic Instruction. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12C):4-7. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12C-2.

Correspondence to: Josiah  Gabriel Hunt, Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Cavite, Philippines. Email: huntj@aiias.edu

Abstract

This paper examines the impact globalization has had on the English language. As English has arisen to become the de facto official language of over 90 nations, the question is asked: Whose culture should be taught in language classrooms? It is suggested that cultural instruction should not be limited to that of Western nations, but must be globally inclusive taking into account diverse perspectives. In doing so, language learners develop the communicative competence needed to effectively interact in cross-cultural exchanges.

Keywords

References

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Article

Jerry Fodor and the Reinterpretation of the Phrenological Model

1PPGF, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil

2Core Human Formation, Positivo Online University, Curitiba, Brazil

3Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12C), 8-10
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12C-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Cleverson Leite Bastos, Gustavo Luiz Gava, Carlos Eduardo de Carvalho Vargas. Jerry Fodor and the Reinterpretation of the Phrenological Model. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12C):8-10. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12C-3.

Correspondence to: Cleverson  Leite Bastos, PPGF, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. Email: leite.bastos@pucpr.br

Abstract

In tentative to support the “vertical tradition” in faculty psychology, Jerry Fodor reached resources in the phrenological model of Franz Gall. Fodor offers a reinterpretation of Gall’s work to demonstrate the emphasis investigative in the study of the mental structures and, indirectly, in the actual memory research, judgment, attention, among others. Jerry Fodor sought to highlight affirmative evidence that hides the phrenology of Gall, correcting and improving the phrenological model to research functional subsystems in the human mind. Deeping this issue, it is understood that the issue of modularity of mind contributed to undertake the current studies on the processes of teaching and learning, departing from the modular model proposed by Gall and Fodor.

Keywords

References

[1]  Candiotto, K. Fundamentos epistemológicos da teoria modular da mente de Jerry A. Fodor. Trans/Form/Ação, Marília, v. 31, n. 2, pp. 119-135, 2008.
 
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[4]  Gardner, H. Estruturas da mente: a teoria das inteligências múltiplas. Edusp, São Paulo, 1996.
 
[5]  Goodwin, J. História da psicologia moderna. Cultrix, São Paulo, 2005.
 
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[11]  Singh, A. K. The Comprehensive History of Psychology. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, 1991.
 
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Article

A Project for Implementation of the Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment Programme in Adult Literacy

1Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12C), 11-13
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12C-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Carlos Eduardo de Carvalho Vargas. A Project for Implementation of the Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment Programme in Adult Literacy. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12C):11-13. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12C-4.

Correspondence to: Carlos  Eduardo de Carvalho Vargas, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. Email: carlos.vargas@ibge.gov.br

Abstract

This project aims to provide an effective methodology and innovative local action in the area of youth and adults education. Justifying in the Brazilian social context and relying on the theory of the Dr. Reuven Feuerstein's mediated learning, a strategy of action will be presented to cognitively improve the performance of young people and adults in the literacy process.

Keywords

References

[1]  Blagg, N. Can We Teach Intelligence? A Comprehensive of Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment. Hillsdale: Erlbaum Associates, 1991. 217p.
 
[2]  CDCP. Experiência de Aprendizagem Mediada EAM. CDCP, 2001. Avaiable in: http://www.cdcp.com.br/pindex.htm.
 
[3]  Zeidner, M., Matthews, G., Roberts, R. Intelligence Theory, Assessment, and Research: The Israeli Experience. In: Sternberg, R. (ed.). International Handbook of Intelligence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 212-247.
 
[4]  Feuerstein, R. Instrumental enrichment: an intervention program for cognitivie modifibility. Glenview: Scott, Foresman and Company: 1980.
 
[5]  Feuerstein, R., Falik, L. H., Feuerstein, R. The learning Potential Assessment Device: Na Alternative Approach to the Assessment of Learning Potential. In Samuda, R., Feuerstein, R. et alli. Advanced in Cross-Cultural Assessment. Thousand Oaks: London: New Delhi: Sage Publications, 1998. 311p.
 
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Article

The Student Wheels Strategy in Teaching Speaking Skills to Cultivate Politeness at Junior High School

1English Department FKIP Lambung Mangkurat University Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12), 1211-1217
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12-13
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nanik Mariani Effendie. The Student Wheels Strategy in Teaching Speaking Skills to Cultivate Politeness at Junior High School. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12):1211-1217. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12-13.

Correspondence to: Nanik  Mariani Effendie, English Department FKIP Lambung Mangkurat University Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Email: nanikmariani59@yahoo.com

Abstract

The English Course is one of the foreign language courses that must be taught as a compulsory subject at school, especially in the Junior High School. It is more stressed on knowledge of the four standards of competence or the four language skills, without considering the ethical values contained in that four language skills. It means that the teaching and learning English, especially in speaking skills, should be taught not only in the cognitive skills, but also in the affective skills as well. The education regarding how language-speaking politely, considering the value of tolerance, sympathy, and empathy. So implementing politeness in the process of teaching English speaking skills is important. Politeness is the rules of conduct established and agreed upon jointly by a particular community so that politeness as well as be concluded by the prerequisite of social behavior. To cultivate politeness in English speaking class, the English teachers at Junior High Schools (SMP) can use the teaching strategy, such as Student wheels strategy. Student Wheels is adopted from Hadfield (in Sulistiyowati, 2009: 72-73) to get the students more active in speaking class and accustomed in using polite language. Using Student wheels, all students can get their roles in speaking because they have to interact each other by standing in two circles formed as wheels. In this strategy, all students use the expressions of English speaking thought by the teacher and they can accustom by themselves in implementing politeness in the classroom.

Keywords

References

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Article

Democratic Values and Democratic Approach in Teaching: A Perspective

1Assistant. Professor, Dept. of Education, Southfield College, Darjeeling, West Bengal, INDIA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12A), 37-40
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12A-6
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Dipty Subba. Democratic Values and Democratic Approach in Teaching: A Perspective. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12A):37-40. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12A-6.

Correspondence to: Dipty  Subba, Assistant. Professor, Dept. of Education, Southfield College, Darjeeling, West Bengal, INDIA. Email: Diptysubba1@yahoo.com

Abstract

This paper introduces the importance of Democratic Values and place the role of teachers in the present democratic world. India is the solitary country in the world where greater importance is attached to the teacher. Schools are places where democratic ideals such as equality, freedom, justice are instilled in individuals. Teachers are the ultimate instruments of change. For democracy to continue to thrive, children must be taught to value it as a way of life. The necessary skills for building democracy do not develop automatically in children. Teaching democracy means preparing children to become citizens who will preserve and shape democracy in the future. Therefore democracy should be a key aspect in every form of education at the earliest age possible. Children should learn about taking responsibility for their action. These educational outcomes are only possible through action. While key concepts of democracy should be understood by children, living and acting in a democratic environment is the only and the best exercise. Schools, institutions, children’s clubs and organizations and even families that respect democratic principles and have real democratic structures function as the best models to help children learn what democracy is about. The qualities like tolerance, acceptance, a wider view, global awareness, reflection and equal justice rests within the teachers to shape the child in all possible ways to face this competitive world of today. Teachers' beliefs, thoughts and decisions on educational matters occupy the major part of the psychological context of teaching process. Teacher educators should democratize their pedagogy so that their trainees learn understandings and skills of democratic practice throughout their training experience. The appropriate balance between critical components skills, knowledge and dispositions, on one hand, and an open, dynamic and critically engaged curriculum, and teaching and learning conceptual framework, on the other hand has not yet been attained.

Keywords

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