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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

Article

Students' Perspectives about Nursing Education

1Faculty of Nursing, Menofia University, Menofia, Egypt / Currently, Dean, Faculty of Nursing, Zarqa University, Zarqa, Jordan

2Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, Zarqa University, Zarqa, Jordan

3Faculty of Nursing, Zarqa University, Zarqa, Jordan


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 288-291
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-6
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Manal Zeinhom Ahmed, Hasan Touama, Ahmad Rayan. Students' Perspectives about Nursing Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):288-291. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-6.

Correspondence to: Manal  Zeinhom Ahmed, Faculty of Nursing, Menofia University, Menofia, Egypt / Currently, Dean, Faculty of Nursing, Zarqa University, Zarqa, Jordan. Email: Mahmed215@yahoo.com

Abstract

Evaluation is becoming a necessary part of nursing education. Educators rely on evaluation in order to measure the quality of their teaching and to identify areas where improvement is needed in nursing education. The current study aims at determining nursing students' perspectives regarding their course content and teaching methodology. In addition, some suggestions for improvement of nursing curricula were obtained from the students. Mixed methods using concurrent triangulation design were used. Eleven theoretical nursing courses in the first semester of the academic year 2013/2014 were subjected to evaluation by students in which they were enrolled. The instrument used in the study was designed by the researchers; its validity and reliability were assured. Results indicated that content of courses and teaching methods were clear, comprehensive and well organized. Online materials and well prepared and organized instructors who use class time effectively were emphasized. On the contrary, a noisy environment was the most frequent aspect which negatively affected students' learning process.

Keywords

References

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[5]  Gough, K., and Happell, B, “Undergraduate nursing students’ attitude to mental health nursing: A cluster analysis approach,” Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18 (22). 3155-3164. 2009.
 
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[7]  Creedy, D., Mitchell, M., Seaton,-Sykes, P., Cooke, M., Patterson, E., and Purcell, C, “Evaluating a Web enhanced bachelor of nursing curriculum: Prespectives of third-year students,” Journal of Nursing Education. 46 (10). 460-467. 2007.
 
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[10]  Cresswell, J. W., and Clark, V. L. P, Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 2007.
 
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[14]  Halcomb, E. J., and Peters, K,” Nursing student feedback on undergraduate research education: Implications for teaching and learning,” Contemporary Nurse, 33 (1). 59-68. 2009.
 
[15]  Birks, M., Cant, R., Al-Motleq, M., and Jones, J, “I don’t want to become a scientist. Understanding nursing students’ percieved value of course content”, Australian Journal of Advanced Nursding. 28 (4). 20-27. 2011.
 
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[17]  Yang, Z., Becerik-Gerber, B., and Mino, “ A study on student perceptions of higher education classrooms: Impact of classroom attributes on student satisfaction and performance, Building and Environment, 70, 171-188. 2013.
 
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Article

Rhethorics and Realities of Managing Ethno-Religious Conflicts: the Nigerian Experience

1University of Derby, Kedleston Old Road, College of Law, Humanities and Social Sciences, Derby, United Kingdom


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 292-300
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-7
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Beloveth Odochi Nwankwo. Rhethorics and Realities of Managing Ethno-Religious Conflicts: the Nigerian Experience. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):292-300. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-7.

Correspondence to: Beloveth  Odochi Nwankwo, University of Derby, Kedleston Old Road, College of Law, Humanities and Social Sciences, Derby, United Kingdom. Email: belovethodo@yahoo.com

Abstract

Political, ethno-religious or social conflicts often spring from the pursuance of divergent ideas, aspirations and interests expressed by a group of people or individuals under particular environmental conditions. Nigeria, like many African countries, is a multi-ethnic country with over 250 ethnic groups, where Islam and Christianity are the two predominant religious beliefs. Since independence, in 1960, Nigeria has struggled to control ethno-religious conflicts. Currently, these conflicts are on the increase with the formation of various ethno-religious militias, such as the Oodua People’s Congress (OPC), the Bakassi Boys, the Egbesu Boys and most recently Boko Haram. These conflicts manifest themselves in the form of riots, sabotage, assassination, armed struggles, guerrilla warfare and campaigns for secession. This article explores the rhetoric and realities of managing ethno-religious conflicts in Nigeria with an emphasis on the nature of the conflicts, the protagonists and the management mechanisms employed in that country. In terms of methodology, this study was designed to survey primary and secondary sources of literature relevant to the study. It is a case study analysis of ethno-religious issues in the country. In essence, it has contextualised the study based on religion and ethnic considerations. The sources of data include a survey of the Nigeria Watch database which maps the trends of violent deaths in Nigeria, articles on religious and ethnic violence; newspapers; and, pertinent books, alongside content analysis of the qualitative data. The article argues that one of the abatement measures is that every group must discourage the primordial sentiments in communities expressed by ethnic and religious groups.

Keywords

References

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Article

Perception of the Students in Computer Engineering in the Use of Online Courses as Teaching-Learning Process Support in the Software Engineering I Course

1Departamento de Ciencias Tecnológicas, Centro Universitario de la Cienega, Universidad de Guadalajara, Ocotlán, Jalisco, México


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 301-306
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-8
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ma del Carmen Nolasco Salcedo. Perception of the Students in Computer Engineering in the Use of Online Courses as Teaching-Learning Process Support in the Software Engineering I Course. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):301-306. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-8.

Correspondence to: Ma  del Carmen Nolasco Salcedo, Departamento de Ciencias Tecnológicas, Centro Universitario de la Cienega, Universidad de Guadalajara, Ocotlán, Jalisco, México. Email: mcns08@gmail.com

Abstract

The majority of individuals possess a reference endowed by the experience left by their passage through classrooms in the process of educational and vocational training. However, on addressing support for student-centered learning, we must determine what this is concerned with and what it covers. The aim of this paper was to analyze the implications of learning on students applying an unconventional model, supported by the Information Technology and Communications and with the incorporation of new methodological paradigms in the teaching-learning process for presentation and management of courses, urging both teachers and students toward a change in the role that they had played to date, after their preliminary training process had been based on a traditional model. The analysis refers to the case of the Cienega University Center of the University of Guadalajara, Mexico, with data from surveys of a statistically representative sample of the student population enrolled in this institution during the 6th, 7th and 8th academic year of the Software Engineering I course on computers and educational programs offered on this same computer, because it is in those cycles that the experiment was held on the process and the learning tools specific to this educative model, particularly the use of online courses.

Keywords

References

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Article

Designing and Testing the Model of Learners' Satisfaction towards On-The-Job Training Courses Case: National Iranian Gas Company

1PhD student in Educational administration, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

2Assistant Professor, Higher Education, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

3Associate Professor, Curriculum Planning and Higher Education, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

4Assisstant Professor, Educational Psychology, Academic Faculty of Bushehr Persian Gulf University


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 307-311
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-9
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Bahram Fadaiyan, Hamideh Reshadatjoo, Ali Taghipour Zahir, Seyyed Musa Golestaneh. Designing and Testing the Model of Learners' Satisfaction towards On-The-Job Training Courses Case: National Iranian Gas Company. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):307-311. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-9.

Correspondence to: Bahram  Fadaiyan, PhD student in Educational administration, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran. Email: b_fadaiyan@yahoo.com

Abstract

Staff development and improving job status done through training is concerned as important parts of Human Resource Management in the third millennium organizations. In the US companies, 135 billion dollars is allocated each year for training (Patel, 2010) and most of Asian rich countries are also trying to review their educational sytems to make required changes for enrichment of economy (Kayani, 2008:3). Continuity of the training needs to use and apply a uniformed system to promote staff's satisfaction and effectiveness of training process. The aim of this paper is to design and test the Model of Learners' Satisfaction about on-the-job training courses among those staff working in National Iranian Gas Company (NIGC). Statistical population consisted of 40000 staff working in NIGC among which 384 persons were randomly selected based on multi-stage clustering sampling method. Data were obtained via two survey questionnaires (Salanova, 2009; NIGC, 2013) with highly acceptable validity and reliability (α=0.82%). Findings, based on Regression Analysis, showed that the best predictors for learners' satisfaction about OJT courses would respectively be planning and implementation, content, time, goals and priority, executive management, need assessment, way of evaluation, welfare and services, teacher's ability, facilities and equipments. Furthermore, indices of the proposed model represented the goodness fitness of the model. Finally, some required suggestions and ways were delivered.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Philosophical Foundations of Educational Research: a Beginner’s Guide

1School of Education, TESOL, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 312-317
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-10
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Hussein Assalahi. The Philosophical Foundations of Educational Research: a Beginner’s Guide. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):312-317. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-10.

Correspondence to: Hussein  Assalahi, School of Education, TESOL, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK. Email: hmaa202@exeter.ac.uk

Abstract

This paper aims to provide a concise introduction about the philosophical underpinnings of educational research. Whilst the philosophies of educational research have been extensively researched, a concise guide is hoped to uncover research underpinnings for beginners’ postgraduate research students. It overviews the philosophies, paradigms, basic terminologies and related methodologies of educational research. Moreover, the paper provides insights into how researchers’ philosophical stance can inform their research undertaking and transform the educational landscape.

Keywords

Article

Possibility to Engage in Pedagogical Leadership as Experienced by Finnish Newly Appointed Principals

1Training and Development Centre Brahea, University of Turku, Finland

2Institute on Educational Leadership, University of Jyväskylä, Finland


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 318-329
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-11
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Tapio Juhani Lahtero, Lea Kuusilehto-Awale. Possibility to Engage in Pedagogical Leadership as Experienced by Finnish Newly Appointed Principals. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):318-329. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-11.

Correspondence to: Tapio  Juhani Lahtero, Training and Development Centre Brahea, University of Turku, Finland. Email: tapio.lahtero@outlook.com

Abstract

This qualitative research was based on the construct of broad based pedagogical leadership, which comprises not only technical, human and educational (pedagogical) but also symbolic leadership, the meanings interpreted from the principal’s ordinary activity by the school community, the web of which is understood as the cultural leadership of the school. The research purpose was to find out newly appointed principals’ views on what the most common situations of technical, human and educational (pedagogical) leadership were in their ordinary work and how they could enhance the realization of the pedagogical perspective. The data consisted of the written descriptions of the eighteen participants beginning an in-service training. The responses were analyzed with thematic analysis. The dominance of the technical leadership tasks with routine administration as the most common was the biggest obstacle to advancing the pedagogical perspective. The most common human leadership task was interaction and that of pedagogical leadership was strategic leadership. Human and pedagogical leadership tasks were perceived to be partly overlapping. In contrast to studied international research, the respondents made no mention of leading quality teaching, a quality learning environment or strategic resourcing. The informants did not identify symbolic and cultural leadership components. The findings imply that school based management without an increase in managerial human resource in schools efficiently prevents enhancing pedagogical leadership, perceived as the core task of a principal’s ordinary work, that in studying leadership the context always needs to be considered, and that principals’ in-service training ought to comprise broad based pedagogical leadership to inculcate the holistic and integrative character of principalship. These issues merit further and comparative research.

Keywords

References

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Article

Fuzzy Logic in the APOS/ACE Instructional Treatment for Mathematics

1School of Technological Applications, Graduate Technological Educational Institute (T. E. I.) of Western Greece, Patras, Greece


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 330-339
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-12
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Michael Gr. Voskoglou. Fuzzy Logic in the APOS/ACE Instructional Treatment for Mathematics. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):330-339. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-12.

Correspondence to: Michael  Gr. Voskoglou, School of Technological Applications, Graduate Technological Educational Institute (T. E. I.) of Western Greece, Patras, Greece. Email: mvosk@hol.gr

Abstract

In this paper principles of fuzzy logic are introduced for comparing the performance of two student groups concerning the comprehension of real numbers in general and of irrational numbers in particular. The first group was taught the subject in the traditional way (control group), while the APOS/ACE instructional treatment was applied for the second group (experimental group). The two groups are represented as fuzzy subsets of the set of the grades (from A to F) achieved by the students in a pre-instructional and a post-instructional test and the centroid defuzzification technique is applied on comparing their performances. The results of our classroom experiments show that the application of the APOS/ACE approach can effectively help students to enlist the real numbers in a powerful cognitive schema including all the basic sets of numbers.

Keywords

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Article

The Place of Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) in Teaching and Learning in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions

1Department of Teacher Education, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 340-347
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-13
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Hamilton-Ekeke J-T, Mbachu C. E.. The Place of Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) in Teaching and Learning in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):340-347. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-13.

Correspondence to: Hamilton-Ekeke  J-T, Department of Teacher Education, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Email: joytelu@yahoo.com

Abstract

ICT is an accepted acronym of the word Information and Communication Technology. It include diverse set of technology and technological tools used to communicate, disseminates, store and manage information. The use of ICT in schools by staff and students have become a necessity as it can be used to improve the quality of teaching and learning in any tertiary institution. ICT is also a key tool that is having a revolutionary impact on educational methodology globally; however, this revolution is not adopted and widespread in Nigerian universities, it needs to be strengthening to reach the large percentage of universities in the country as only a few universities can boast of ICT and internet connectivity on campus. This study investigated the availability of ICT facilities as well as its usage in one of the newest government owned universities in the oil rich Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The research design was a survey research with a sample size of 843 undergraduate students from three faculties out of the six faculties in the Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection were employed in this study. The quantitative method of data collection involved questionnaire while the qualitative method of data collection involved interview schedule. These two methods of research were adopted in this study in order to triangulate the findings from both instruments. The face and content validity of the instrument was validated by two experts in measurement and evaluation while a reliability index of 0.86 was obtained using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient after the instrument has been administered twice to the same respondents not involved in the study (test re-test method of determining reliability). The research questions posited for this study were analysed using percentages while the hypotheses were tested using chi-square. The study revealed that basic ICT facilities like computers are unavailable, students are unable to afford personal laptop, this has grossly affected e-learning and e-communication channels like email, e-board, internet and organized networking system between staff and students. It is therefore recommended that there should be provision of student workstation and the inculcation of ICT in the curriculum to enable students to be computer literates so they can accept and use ICT in their everyday studies. It is interesting to note that, even in today’s globalizing world, traditional education still continues to exist in the form of socialization, cultural instruction and vocational training. Be it as it may, globalization has come to stay as it reflects the idea that life is a process and that human or a nation’s existence is a process that unfolds with time.

Keywords

References

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Article

Reforming Slovak Tertiary Education to Meet the Real Needs of Enterprises

1Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, STU, Bratislava


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 348-355
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-14
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ing. Ľubomír Šooš, Bc. Malcolm Jones. Reforming Slovak Tertiary Education to Meet the Real Needs of Enterprises. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):348-355. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-14.

Correspondence to: Ing.  Ľubomír Šooš, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, STU, Bratislava. Email: lubomir.soos@stuba.sk

Abstract

Research, science, education, links with work experience, these are terms and words which everybody uses today when talking about what should be the main priority of education in the future for Slovakia. Education is the responsibility of each society or state. In this sense of the meaning we can never be rich enough. So we should ensure we invest our resources effectively in educating young people and investing in the future of our nation.

Keywords

References

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Article

"I Teach Better with the Puppet" - Use of Puppet as a Mediating Tool in Kindergarten Education – an Evaluation

1Pre- school & Special Education Studies, Levinsky College of Education Tel-Aviv, Israel 6148101

2School of Education, Bar-Ilan University Ramat-Gan, Israel 5290002


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 356-365
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-15
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ronit Remer, David Tzuriel. "I Teach Better with the Puppet" - Use of Puppet as a Mediating Tool in Kindergarten Education – an Evaluation. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):356-365. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-15.

Correspondence to: Ronit  Remer, Pre- school & Special Education Studies, Levinsky College of Education Tel-Aviv, Israel 6148101. Email: ronitremer@bezeqint.net

Abstract

A focus of interest among researchers and educators is to find teaching methods adjusted to developmental aspects in early childhood. Teaching that generates significant learning and creates motivation, interest and enjoyment in young children is a real challenge in contemporary education. The effectiveness of using puppets in early childhood has been demonstrated in clinical areas as having the potential to create communication, increase involvement and change attitudes. However, there is limited research literature relating to the use of puppets as a teaching method, and therefore a methodology based on measurement and evaluation is lacking in this field. This article presents partial results of a broader study that examined the influence of an intervention program integrating a puppet as a mediation tool on learning motivation, and enhancing literacy achievements in regular and special kindergarten children. One of the aims of this research was to evaluate, from mediators' perspectives, the use of puppets as a mediation tool for kindergarten children. This evaluation was carried out by means of personal interviews with each of the mediators at the end of the intervention program. From the interviews it became apparent that the mediators considered the puppets to be an effective tool for young children's developmental aspects, by means of which they could relate to cognitive, emotional, and social realms. Mediation using puppets facilitated learning processes, while using puppets, children's cooperation level increased, as did interest, attention span and their involvement in learning interaction was evident. The puppets contributed to the mediators' self-confidence and to their sense of professionalism. During the puppets mediation, the mediators felt that they were teaching in a clear manner, and they felt they were being interesting and. interactive. By using puppets, they succeeded in creating a close personal connection with the children. These findings have an applicable contribution in presenting the effectiveness of the puppet as a mediation tool for use in kindergarten and with special needs children.

Keywords

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