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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

Article

Social Network, Social Trust and Shared-Goals towards Organizational-Knowledge Sharing

1Research Department, Cagayan valley Computer and Information technology College, Inc., Santiago City, Philippines

2Office Administration Department, Cagayan valley Computer and Information technology College, Inc., Santiago City, Philippines


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(5), 662-667
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-5-21
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Romiro G. Bautista, May A. Bayang. Social Network, Social Trust and Shared-Goals towards Organizational-Knowledge Sharing. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(5):662-667. doi: 10.12691/education-3-5-21.

Correspondence to: Romiro  G. Bautista, Research Department, Cagayan valley Computer and Information technology College, Inc., Santiago City, Philippines. Email: bautista.romer@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study ascertains that organizational-knowledge sharing is facilitated by social network, social trust and shared-goal in a culture of trust, cooperation and participation. Trust advancement and civil participation networks facilitate relationship and reinforce existing information about trust of people. Individuals move closer to each other in social ceremonies by doing the same behaviors. This concordance leads to trust and confidence and high social participation in limited, medium and wide ranges. There is a close relationship between in group trust and participation and formation of voluntary and civil associations. Employing Descriptive Research design, including survey, in-depth study, correlation and comparison, data was gathered on the prevalence of organizational-knowledge sharing. It was found out that social network, social trust and shared-goals are independent of age and educational attainment; however, social thrust was found dependent with the respondents’ work-department. Moreover, social network social trust and shared-goals were found highly significantly related to their attitude towards knowledge-sharing, subjective norms on knowledge-sharing, and intentions to share knowledge.

Keywords

References

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Article

Prospect of Integrating African Indigenous Knowledge Systems into the Teaching of Sciences in Africa

1Department of Mathematics, Science and Sport Education, Faculty of Education, University of Namibia, Katima Mulilo Campus, Private Bag, 1096, Katima Mulilo, Namibia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 668-673
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
J. Abah, P. Mashebe, D.D. Denuga. Prospect of Integrating African Indigenous Knowledge Systems into the Teaching of Sciences in Africa. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):668-673. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-1.

Correspondence to: J.  Abah, Department of Mathematics, Science and Sport Education, Faculty of Education, University of Namibia, Katima Mulilo Campus, Private Bag, 1096, Katima Mulilo, Namibia. Email: jabah@unam.na

Abstract

The consideration of cultural backgrounds of the learners in planning and teaching science has informed much recent discussions in making teaching more learner-centered. In many countries today, formal education continues to be Euro-centric in outlook and academic in orientation, reflecting Western scientific cultures rather than the cultures of learners and the teachers. This phenomenon is a major concern in developing countries, where formal education does not put into consideration the way the majorities of learners communicate, think and learn. Leaners’ underachievement in school has been attributed to the ‘cultural gaps’ between the expectations of school curriculum and those of the environment in which the learners are socialized. In the developing countries, this gap also existed for majority of the teachers and thus, raises the question of whose and what knowledge is considered worthwhile? The current euphoria for market driven economies and education development make issues such as cross cultural transfer of knowledge, globalized curricula integration and appropriate teaching-learning strategies critically important for consideration. While commendable efforts are being made to better align educational curricula with indigenous realities, the interrelationship and balance between these two different ways of learning remain delicate especially in the African context. This review study focuses among others, the indigenous peoples’ systems of knowledge creation and transmission, modern science versus African indigenous knowledge, improving Science teaching in Africa, and the impact of indigenous knowledge system on scientific discovery and development.

Keywords

References

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Article

Functional Continuity in Adaptive Reuse of Historic Buildings: Evaluating a Studio Experience

1Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture, Department of Interior Architecture, Taşkışla, 34437 Taksim, Istanbul/Turkey


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 674-682
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-2
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nilüfer Sağlar Onay, Deniz Ayşe Yazıcıoğlu. Functional Continuity in Adaptive Reuse of Historic Buildings: Evaluating a Studio Experience. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):674-682. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-2.

Correspondence to: Deniz  Ayşe Yazıcıoğlu, Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture, Department of Interior Architecture, Taşkışla, 34437 Taksim, Istanbul/Turkey. Email: denizayseyazicioglu@gmail.com

Abstract

Interior architecture is mainly concerned with adapting existing buildings to new uses and requirements. While determining the extent of intervention, the historic and cultural background of the building plays a very important role. Therefore in adaptive reuse, before starting to develop design proposals, buildings of cultural significance need to be analyzed carefully in order to determine architectural and spatial potentials. This paper aims to evaluate the process and results of a design studio, which was realized during 2014-2015 Fall Semester in the ITU Department of Interior Architecture. The main purpose of the studio experience was to create adaptive reuse proposals for a historic commercial building by focusing on the theme of “functional unity”. In the first phase of the study, course program was organized in three basic steps: analyzing spatial potential, determining compatible use and developing project proposals. At the end of every step there was a jury to evaluate each phase. Every step had its own priorities and criteria for the jury. After evaluations project proposals were classified according to their main foci as well as advantages and disadvantages of different approaches in terms of functional unity. As a result it was observed that in historic buildings there are different ways of maintaining functional unity based on the intention of the intervention. While identifying compatible use or uses for a historic building, functional unity needs to be evaluated as one of the basic design criteria in order to retain its cultural significance. This is mainly because a historic building can fully reveal it’s potential only if it is experienced and evaluated as a whole.

Keywords

References

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[5]  Weeks, K.D. and Grimmer, A.E., The Secretary of the Interior’s standards for the treatment of historic properties: with guidelines for preserving, rehabilitating, restoring & reconstructing historic buildings, A.E. U.S. Department of the Interior
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Article

The Civic Educational (PKn) Learning through Thematic Principle in an Effort Developing Moral Intelligence (Study of Qualitative in SD Laboratorium PGSD FIP UNJ 2010)

1State University of Jakarta, Indonesia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 683-688
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-3
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nina Nurhasanah, Nadiroh. The Civic Educational (PKn) Learning through Thematic Principle in an Effort Developing Moral Intelligence (Study of Qualitative in SD Laboratorium PGSD FIP UNJ 2010). American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):683-688. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-3.

Correspondence to:  Nadiroh, State University of Jakarta, Indonesia. Email: asdir3@ppsunj.org

Abstract

The objective of this research is to find out the implementation of PKn learning through thematic principle in an effort to develop moral intelligence, especially about feeling of respect toward others and empathy for students at first grade of SD Laboratorium PGSD FIP UNJ. This research is using qualitative method. The process of accumulation data is done through triangulation which consisted of (1) observation, (2) interview, and (3) document analysis. The data is being analyzed with focused observation, taxonomy analysis, chosen observation, component analysis, and theme analysis. The data’s validity is done by extension of participation, tenuously observation and triangulation. This research finding shows that: (1) moral intelligence of the first grade elementary school student had abled to develop moral intelligence, especially feeling of respect towards others and empathy, but there are some students still have difficulties in developing respect; (2) factors that are influencing feeling of respect toward others and empathy consist of supporting factor such as curriculum; teacher; book; and student. Where the factors that become obstacles consist of curriculum; book; student; media; (3) the strategy which is used by the teacher in developing feeling of respect toward others and empathy is consist of introduction, main activity and closing. With this thematic learning that is implemented through PKn (civil education) in SD Laboratorium PGSD FIP UNJ absolutely can develop the moral intelligence of student especially feeling of respect toward others and empathy.

Keywords

References

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Article

Some Modern Trends in Educational Leadership and Its Role in Developing the Performance of the Egyptian Secondary School Managers

1Deanship of development and quality, Hail University, kingdom of Saudi Arabia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 689-696
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-4
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Hany R Alalfy. Some Modern Trends in Educational Leadership and Its Role in Developing the Performance of the Egyptian Secondary School Managers. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):689-696. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-4.

Correspondence to: Hany  R Alalfy, Deanship of development and quality, Hail University, kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Email: hany_alalfy@yahoo.com

Abstract

The study Aimed developing the performance of secondary school managers in Egypt in light of some modern trends for educational leadership throw identifying the problems that face those managers, identifying the requirements of the application of those trends and identifying new roles for those managers in the light of these trends. The study problem: The Egyptian secondary schools are suffering from more problems that eliminate from Efficient and effective performance of the managers of those schools. These influential problems are creating the need for new trends to the leading of the Egyptian secondary schools. The study problem is summarized in the main following question what is the role of modern trends in educational leadership in the development of secondary school performance managers in Egypt? The study used a descriptive approach for its suitability for the nature of the study. The study found out many results one of the most important results is revealed that the Egyptian secondary school managers find it difficult to meet the new managerial expectations that are brought about by the changes in educational environment and frequent problems that faced them. The study suggested organizing training programs to the manager of the Egyptian secondary school for training in the application of these modern trends and Develop mechanisms to motivate the Egyptian secondary school managers on the application of these modern trends.

Keywords

References

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Article

Correlations between Medical Students National Admission Test Score, Preclinical and Clinical Year Mean Cumulative GPA and UKDI Score

1Faculty of Medicine, Pattimura University, Ambon Indonesia

2Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine Hasanuddin University Makassar Indonesia

3Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine Hasanuddin University Makassar Indonesia

4Department of Opthalmology, Faculty of Medicine Hasanuddin University Makassar Indonesia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 697-701
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-5
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jacob Manuputty, Irawan Yusuf, Ilhamjaya Patellongi, Suryani As’ad, Budu. Correlations between Medical Students National Admission Test Score, Preclinical and Clinical Year Mean Cumulative GPA and UKDI Score. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):697-701. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-5.

Correspondence to: Jacob  Manuputty, Faculty of Medicine, Pattimura University, Ambon Indonesia. Email: manuputty_jacob@yahoo.com

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether medical students’ national admission test scores correlated with their preclinical and clinical year GPAs. We also sought to correlate their national admission test scores and GPAs with the Indonesian Medical Doctor Competency Examination (UKDI) score. Method: A retrospective cohort study was done based on past medical students’ record. Samples were students admitted to the medical school commencing 2006 (after Competency-based Curriculum was implemented) and had passed their first-time UKDI. Data collection was conducted on medical school of four public universities who agreed to provide the data of their medical students’ data. Correlation between variables was analyzed using a two-tailed Pearson correlation for normally distributed data, and Spearman’s rho for non-normal distribution. Result: We found significant correlation between preclinical year GPA with basic math (r=0.31), with English (r=0.35; r=0.38), with Chemistry (r=0.20) and with physic (r=0.20). Clinical year GPA had a significant correlation with natural science math (r=-0.20), with chemistry (r= 0.17) and with English (r = 0.12; r = 0.29). UKDI score was correlated with Biology (r = 0.29), with Physic (r = 0.20; r = 0.11), and with chemistry (r = 0.11). UKDI score also had significant correlation with clinical year GPA (r = 0.45; r = 0.23; r = 0.26). UKDI score was significantly correlated with preclinical year GPA and the result was consistent on all medical schools; Andalas students (r = 0.40), Brawijaya students (r = 0.49), Hasanuddin students (r = 0.37), and Sriwijaya students (r = 0.45). Conclusion: National admission test scores were significantly correlated with preclinical and clinical year GPAs, and with UKDI scores, but the correlations were seen only on certain medical schools. Preclinical year GPA was significantly correlated with UKDI score and the result was consistent on all medical schools.

Keywords

References

[1]  BAN-PT. 2014. Accreditation of Medical Education Study Program. National Accreditation Board of Higher Education (BAN-PT). Jakarta, Indonesia.
 
[2]  Evans P, Wen FK. 2007. Does the Medical College Admission Test Predict Global Academic Performance in Osteopathic Medical School? JAOA. 107(4).
 
[3]  Ferguson E, James D, Madeley L. 2002. Factors associated with success in medical school: systematic review of the literature. BMJ. 324(7343): 952-957.
 
[4]  Santoso D. 2013. Policy of CBC in Medical Education. Paper presented at the Meeting of Dean of Medical Faculty – Indonesian Ministry of Health 21 January 2013. Jakarta, Indonesia.
 
[5]  Selvandega WP, Priharsanti CHN, Kristina TN. 2011. Association Between Total Grade Point Average And UKDI’s Scores Of Medical Education Programme : A Case Study On Medical Faculty of Diponegoro University. Thesis. Medical Faculty of Diponegoro University.
 
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[7]  Suswati I. 2010. Correlation between the student’s score in entrance test and student’s academic grade point at Medical Faculty of Muhammadiyah University of Malang. Medical Scientific Journal of Muhammadiyah University of Malang. Vol 6. No 12.
 
[8]  Syafruddin A, Rahayu GR, Prabandari YS. 2013. The correlation between score of cognitive in undergraduate and clinical rotation and score of Indonesian Medical Doctor Competency Examination (UKDI). Facultyof medicine and health journal of Universitas Muhammadiyah Jakarta. July.
 
[9]  Wasisto, B. 2013. Managing professionalism of Indonesian Clinician. Eight years of Indonesian Medical Council. Indonesian Medical Council. Jakarta, Indonesia. http://www.kki.go.id/assets/data/arsip/SewinduKKI.pdf [accessed on 23 December 2014).
 
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[12]  Zou KH, Tuncali K, Silverman SG. 2003. Correlation and simple linear regression. Radiology. 227(3):617-622.
 
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Article

Application of Computer Based Learning Model Tutorial as Medium of Learning

1Institute of Islamic Religious Kendari Southeast Sulawesi Indonesia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 702-706
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-6
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ambar Sri Lestari. Application of Computer Based Learning Model Tutorial as Medium of Learning. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):702-706. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-6.

Correspondence to: Ambar  Sri Lestari, Institute of Islamic Religious Kendari Southeast Sulawesi Indonesia. Email: ambarlstr@gmail.com

Abstract

This study aimed to describe the application of computer-based learning tutorial models in presenting learning materials. The approach used in this study is a qualitative approach in the form of assignment to students about the application of computer-based learning tutorial model as a medium of learning by using portfolio assessment. This research was conducted on students of Islamic religious education (PAI) in class III A, B and C odd semester 2014/2015 who take courses learning media. Assessment used in this study is an assessment portfolio because of: 1) the assessment should be based on the work / student work, 3) assessment include cognitive, affective and psychomotor student. Provides an overview of research results by applying a computer-based learning tutorial models are more motivated students in receiving and delivering the material because it is more varied and not monotonous at a lecture course, in addition to the students to be more creative in the presentation of the material. With the tutorial models are abstract concepts that can visualized more concrete so that learning becomes more meaningful.

Keywords

References

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[3]  Dahar, R. W. Theories of Learning. Jakarta: Erlangga. 1996.
 
[4]  Daryanto. Instructional Media. Bandung: Sarana Tutorial Nurani Sejahtera. 2011.
 
[5]  Fernsten,L., & Fernsten,J. Portfolio Assessment and Reflection: Enhancing Learning Through Effective Practice. Reflective Practive 6 (2), 2005.
 
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[7]  Munir. Based Curriculum Information and Communication Technology. Bandung: SPS Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. 2008.
 
[8]  Newby, T. J., Stepich, D. A., Lehman, J. D., & Russel J. D. Educational Technology for Teaching and Learning. Upper Saddle River, NJ : Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall. 2006.
 
[9]  Rusman. Learning Models: Development Teacher Professional. Jakarta. Raja Grafindo Persada. 2011.
 
[10]  Sadiman, A. S., Rahardjo, R., Haryono, A., & Rahardjito. Media Education: Definition, Development and Utilization. Jakarta : Rajawali Press. 2008.
 
[11]  Sardiman. Interaction and Learning Motivation. Jakarta. Rajagrafindo Persada. 2011.
 
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[16]  Wena, Made. Contemporary Innovative Learning Strategies: A Conceptual Overview of Operations. Jakarta: Bumi Aksara. 2011.
 
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Article

Continuing Education for High School Resource Teachers and Their Sense of Self-efficacy

1Specialized Education and Training Department at the University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 707-712
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-7
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
France Dubé, Nancy Granger, France Dufour. Continuing Education for High School Resource Teachers and Their Sense of Self-efficacy. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):707-712. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-7.

Correspondence to: France  Dubé, Specialized Education and Training Department at the University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada. Email: dube.france@uqam.ca

Abstract

This action-research project was conducted in three Quebec schools and its aim was to support resource teachers that teach high school students at risk and with learning difficulties. All participating resource teachers (N = 29) attended collaborative teachers-researchers meetings focusing on the characteristics and needs of students' with learning difficulties as well as on effective reading and writing strategies and procedures. Additionally, a test on their sense of self-efficacy was administered before and after the training. The paper also describes the mentoring and collaboration processes, the effects they had on actual classroom practices and on resource teachers' sense of self-efficacy. The facilitators and the obstacles encountered will also be presented and a few solutions will be proposed to improve this type of collaboration.

Keywords

References

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[5]  Leclerc, M., Communauté d’apprentissage professionnelle. Guide à l’intention des leaders scolaires, Québec: Presses de l’Université du Québec, 2012.
 
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Article

Contemporary Plastic Visions of Glass Formation Arts to Enrich the Aesthetic and Creative Side upon the Students of Art Education at the University of Umm Al Qura- Saudi Arabia

1Department of Art Education, Faculty of Education Umm Al Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 713-720
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-8
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mona Ibrahim Hussein, Sanaa Mohamed Rashad Similan. Contemporary Plastic Visions of Glass Formation Arts to Enrich the Aesthetic and Creative Side upon the Students of Art Education at the University of Umm Al Qura- Saudi Arabia. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):713-720. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-8.

Correspondence to: Sanaa  Mohamed Rashad Similan, Department of Art Education, Faculty of Education Umm Al Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Email: Dr.Sanaa-mrs@hotmail.com

Abstract

Through history the way of blowing in the glass had a special position in the production of bottles and vases of decorations, this method, which relies on air mobilization inside the vials and templates after heated and melted at high degrees of heat as the blowing process in a block of dough glass produces different forms of glass products such as jugs, vases, candy boxes, decoration boxes, flasks, and the artist identifies the form and the final size of the piece to be configured, and choose the decoration and etching type on the surface, and needs high technical skills such as assiduity in front of furnaces operating at high degrees of heat, and continuous training to master this industry, as well as providing creative and artistic ability to acquire more skill and then convoying time to keep up with innovation, development and production of various models from time to time. This research provides a modern entrances in teaching stained glass course at the Faculty of Education - Umm Al Qura University with plastic contemporary visions, so the educational and service institutions can benefit from the development of the artwork, in an effort to reach the highest degree of excellence in performance, and through the production of innovative art works in glass art, in order to identify the theoretical concepts related to the work of colored and stained glass to study the techniques and technical, aesthetic and utilitarian characteristics of glass and their applications.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Lack of Physics Teachers: “Like a Bath with the Plug out and the Tap half on”

1College of Education, Health and Human Development, University of Canterbury, New Zealand


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(6), 721-730
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-6-9
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Isaac Buabeng, Lindsey Conner, David Winter. The Lack of Physics Teachers: “Like a Bath with the Plug out and the Tap half on”. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(6):721-730. doi: 10.12691/education-3-6-9.

Correspondence to: Isaac  Buabeng, College of Education, Health and Human Development, University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Email: isaac.buabeng@pg.canterbury.ac.nz, ibuabeng@ucc.edu.gh

Abstract

In this study, we were interested in how approaches to teaching high school physics in New Zealand influenced students’ perceptions of physics and their consequent desire to continue with physics. We also investigated the reasons participants became physics teachers to inform how more teachers might be attracted into the profession. The convergent parallel design of this study used mixed methods including a national survey as well as classroom observations and interviews with teachers and students. The study has identified how a focus on content knowledge and more “traditional” teaching approaches tends to discourage students to progress with physics.

Keywords

References

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[4]  Archibald, S. (2006). Narrowing in on educational resources that do affect student achievement. Peabody Journal of Education, 81(4), 23-42.
 
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[10]  Campbell, T., Danhui, Z., & Neilson, D. (2011). Model based inquiry in the high school physics classroom: An exploratory study of implementation and outcomes. Journal of Science Education & Technology, 20(3), 258-269.
 
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[12]  Cohen, L., Manion, L., & Morrison, K. (2007). Research methods in education (6th ed.). New York: Routledge.
 
[13]  Conner, L. (2013). Meeting the needs of diverse learners in New Zealand. Preventing School Failure: Alternative Education for Children and Youth, 57(3), 157-161.
 
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