ISSN (Print): 2328-7241

ISSN (Online): 2328-7233

Editor-in-Chief: Mohsen Saeedi, Hyo Choi

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ENV

   

Article

Inclusion of Local People and Their Cultural Practices in Biodiversity Conservation: Lessons from Successful Nations

1Department of General Arts Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana


American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2016, 4(3), 67-78
doi: 10.12691/env-4-3-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Dickson Adom. Inclusion of Local People and Their Cultural Practices in Biodiversity Conservation: Lessons from Successful Nations. American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2016; 4(3):67-78. doi: 10.12691/env-4-3-2.

Correspondence to: Dickson  Adom, Department of General Arts Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. Email: adomdick@yahoo.com

Abstract

The inclusion of local people and their cultural practices impact positively on biodiversity conservation. This is the underlying factors behind the success stories of countries with high numbers of biological diversity resources. It is sad to reckon that most biodiversity policies of developing countries like Ghana do not fully include the voices of the local people as well as their cultural practices. There was, therefore, the need to thoroughly review the national biodiversity strategies and action plans of some countries that have effectively factored the local people and their cultural practices in their biodiversity policies. This was to elucidate how and in what areas the views of the local people and their cultural practices can be effectively incorporated into biodiversity conservation initiatives. The study utilized qualitative research approach with document analysis method. Related literature on the subject from peer-reviewed manuscripts, biodiversity strategic reports and strategies of different countries were rigorously reviewed and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The study revealed that local people have time-tested conservation knowledge enfolded in their cultural practices like religious beliefs, taboos, etc. Legal backing was seen as the main driving force behind the utilization of the cultural practices of the local people in the biodiversity strategies reviewed. Moreover, the local people were fully involved in the development of the biodiversity strategies. This was seen in the areas of planning, management, and decision-making, recruitment of staff, as well as the dissemination and implementation of the biodiversity strategy. The study concluded that effective biodiversity policies must reflect the cultural practices and the views of local people since they are powerful instruments of conservation. It tasks biodiversity policy designers to fully incorporate local communities and their cultural practices in the development of biodiversity strategies.

Keywords

References

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Article

Community Forest and Forest Management in Nepal

1Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan


American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2016, 4(3), 79-91
doi: 10.12691/env-4-3-3
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Bhattarai Binod. Community Forest and Forest Management in Nepal. American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2016; 4(3):79-91. doi: 10.12691/env-4-3-3.

Correspondence to: Bhattarai  Binod, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan. Email: binod_bhattarai2000@yahoo.com

Abstract

This Paper provides brief introduction to the Forest and Community Forest in Nepal and context and status of community forest in Nepal. Community forests in Nepal are built on the experience of other countries around the world, especially its neighbors in South Asia. In order to understand the context and particular designs and objectives of Nepal’s community forestry program, key literature on community forestry is summarized. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of community forestry in Nepal from first protecting local forests and forest products for subsistence needs, to an increased role in income generation and meeting national development goals, including poverty alleviation.

Keywords

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Article

Influence of Oxides of Nitrogen, Carbon Monoxide and Sulpher Dioxide on Surface Ozone Level in Different Meteorological Seasons in Haryana State, Northern India

1Department of Physics, Faculty of Physical Sciences, Shree Guru Gobind Singh Tricentenary (SGT) University Gurgaon, Haryana, India

2Department of Chemistry, Government Senior Secondary School Kakoria Rewari, Haryana, India


American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2017, 5(1), 1-8
doi: 10.12691/env-5-1-1
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ram Chhavi Sharma, Niharika Sharma. Influence of Oxides of Nitrogen, Carbon Monoxide and Sulpher Dioxide on Surface Ozone Level in Different Meteorological Seasons in Haryana State, Northern India. American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2017; 5(1):1-8. doi: 10.12691/env-5-1-1.

Correspondence to: Ram  Chhavi Sharma, Department of Physics, Faculty of Physical Sciences, Shree Guru Gobind Singh Tricentenary (SGT) University Gurgaon, Haryana, India. Email: ramchhavisharma@yahoo.com

Abstract

Surface Ozone concentrations are valuable indicators of possible health and environmental impacts. Increasing concentration of Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a serious air pollution problem faced commonly by the urban people. In the present study ozone (O3), Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) Carbon monoxide (CO) and Sulpher dioxide (SO2) data were collected for a period of one year (January 01, 2015 to December 31, 2015) at three ambient air quality monitoring stations (Gurgaon now Gurugram, Rohtak and Panchkula) in Haryana state in Northern India. The O3, NOx CO, and SO2 data were collected by Haryana State Pollution Control Board. The concentration of O3 is correlated with the concentration of NOx, CO, and SO2 in different meteorological seasons. The regression correlation analysis has been performed between NOx, CO, SO2 and O3 to investigate the relationship between them. It was found that the variation in concentration of NOx, CO and SO2 influenced the changes in the concentration of O3 in different seasons of the year. The investigation data showed that NOx, CO and SO2 had the important influence on O3 concentration variations in monsoon session (r2 = -0.256, -0.322, -0.137 for Gurgaon, r2= 0.997, -0.829 and 0.843 for Rohtak and r2= – 0.854, -0.829 and 0.262 for Panchkula). The influence of SO2 on O3 concentration has been observed to be different from NOx and CO. O3 and NOx were observed to be inversely related in most of the seasons (r2= 0.124, 0.389, -0.256 and -0.694 in Gurgaon, r2 = -0.797, -0.819, 0.997 and -0.797 in Rohtak & r2=0.971,-0.074, -0.854 & 0.784 in Panchkula for spring, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post monsoon season respectively). The regression equations have been obtained which correlates O3 with NOx, CO and SO2.

Keywords

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