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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

Article

Reforming Slovak Tertiary Education to Meet the Real Needs of Enterprises

1Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, STU, Bratislava


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 348-355
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-14
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ing. Ľubomír Šooš, Bc. Malcolm Jones. Reforming Slovak Tertiary Education to Meet the Real Needs of Enterprises. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):348-355. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-14.

Correspondence to: Ing.  Ľubomír Šooš, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, STU, Bratislava. Email: lubomir.soos@stuba.sk

Abstract

Research, science, education, links with work experience, these are terms and words which everybody uses today when talking about what should be the main priority of education in the future for Slovakia. Education is the responsibility of each society or state. In this sense of the meaning we can never be rich enough. So we should ensure we invest our resources effectively in educating young people and investing in the future of our nation.

Keywords

References

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Article

"I Teach Better with the Puppet" - Use of Puppet as a Mediating Tool in Kindergarten Education – an Evaluation

1Pre- school & Special Education Studies, Levinsky College of Education Tel-Aviv, Israel 6148101

2School of Education, Bar-Ilan University Ramat-Gan, Israel 5290002


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 356-365
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-15
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ronit Remer, David Tzuriel. "I Teach Better with the Puppet" - Use of Puppet as a Mediating Tool in Kindergarten Education – an Evaluation. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):356-365. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-15.

Correspondence to: Ronit  Remer, Pre- school & Special Education Studies, Levinsky College of Education Tel-Aviv, Israel 6148101. Email: ronitremer@bezeqint.net

Abstract

A focus of interest among researchers and educators is to find teaching methods adjusted to developmental aspects in early childhood. Teaching that generates significant learning and creates motivation, interest and enjoyment in young children is a real challenge in contemporary education. The effectiveness of using puppets in early childhood has been demonstrated in clinical areas as having the potential to create communication, increase involvement and change attitudes. However, there is limited research literature relating to the use of puppets as a teaching method, and therefore a methodology based on measurement and evaluation is lacking in this field. This article presents partial results of a broader study that examined the influence of an intervention program integrating a puppet as a mediation tool on learning motivation, and enhancing literacy achievements in regular and special kindergarten children. One of the aims of this research was to evaluate, from mediators' perspectives, the use of puppets as a mediation tool for kindergarten children. This evaluation was carried out by means of personal interviews with each of the mediators at the end of the intervention program. From the interviews it became apparent that the mediators considered the puppets to be an effective tool for young children's developmental aspects, by means of which they could relate to cognitive, emotional, and social realms. Mediation using puppets facilitated learning processes, while using puppets, children's cooperation level increased, as did interest, attention span and their involvement in learning interaction was evident. The puppets contributed to the mediators' self-confidence and to their sense of professionalism. During the puppets mediation, the mediators felt that they were teaching in a clear manner, and they felt they were being interesting and. interactive. By using puppets, they succeeded in creating a close personal connection with the children. These findings have an applicable contribution in presenting the effectiveness of the puppet as a mediation tool for use in kindergarten and with special needs children.

Keywords

References

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Article

Librarians Work-Related Learning and Self-Development: Trends in Estonian University Libraries

1Akadeemia tee 1, Tallinn 12618, Estonia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 366-376
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-16
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kate-Riin Kont, Signe Jantson. Librarians Work-Related Learning and Self-Development: Trends in Estonian University Libraries. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):366-376. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-16.

Correspondence to: Kate-Riin  Kont, Akadeemia tee 1, Tallinn 12618, Estonia. Email: kate-riin.kont@ttu.ee

Abstract

Purpose The aim of the current paper is to clarify if the staff of Estonian university libraries has enough opportunities and willingness for continuing education and to develop their skills and competencies related with their everyday work in formal as well as in informal form; whether they have sufficient skills for their current job and what kind of knowledge/skills do librarians miss the most and finally, whether their current income will allow them to continue their education. Methodology The data used in this paper is based on reviewing of relevant literature to provide an overview of the concept of learning and development, and also on the results of the original survey, created by the paper’s authors, held in Estonian university libraries governed by public law in Estonia. The analysis of the results are interpreted on the basis of the literature and authors' opinions, based on long-term working experience in Estonian academic libraries. Findings Although the personnel of university libraries are highly motivated to train themselves, and some are even willing to do it at their own expense, most librarians are relatively pessimistic about their opportunities to develop themselves with their current salary. The increasing salary would be the biggest motivator for continuing education and self-development. There are a number of employees in university libraries who would be willing to participate in professional conferences and seminars. Unfortunately, most of the them are not ready to deliver a presentation. Originality/value The majority of the literature in library science has focused – and rightfully so – on the user: what do users and patrons want and/or need, how do they use it, how can librarians best provide it to them, do the users feel themselves comfortable in library building etc., etc. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no research has been carried out in recent years, in the Estonian university library context to determine continuing education and development. Practical implications Based on the current study it can be said that the biggest challenge for managements of the university libraries in Estonia is to find the opportunities for financial and/or time support which could influence all kind of the development and learning activities of employees.

Keywords

References

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Article

Ghanaian Junior High Science Teachers’ Reflections on the Use of Tessa Secondary Science Modules

1Department of Basic Education, University of Education, Winneba


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(3), 377-382
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-3-17
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ernest Ngman-Wara, Sakina Acquah. Ghanaian Junior High Science Teachers’ Reflections on the Use of Tessa Secondary Science Modules. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(3):377-382. doi: 10.12691/education-3-3-17.

Correspondence to: Ernest  Ngman-Wara, Department of Basic Education, University of Education, Winneba. Email: immaare@yahoo.com

Abstract

The study investigated in-service Junior High School science teachers’ reflections on the use of TESSA secondary science modules. The sample consisted of 34(8 females and 26 males) Junior High School science teachers in Winneba in Central Region of Ghana. Descriptive survey with mixed methods approach was used to collect data using questionnaire and focus group discussion as data collection instruments. The quantitative data collected were analysed through frequency counts and simple percentages while thematic approach was used to analyse the qualitative data. Among other findings, majority of the participants reported that the use of the TESSA resources provided innovative ways of presenting science lessons to their pupils. Also, the participants indicated that their pupils enjoyed and fully participated in these lessons. These notwithstanding, 94 % (32) of participants reported among other things that, accessibility of hard copies of resources would be a challenge to them since most schools did not have ICT tools from which they could print out materials. It is therefore recommended that copies of TESSA secondary science modules be made available in all schools for effective implementation by teachers.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Politics of Conflict over Oil in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria: A Review of the Corporate Social Responsibility Strategies of the Oil Companies

1Department of Humanities, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(4), 383-392
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-4-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Beloveth Odochi Nwankwo. The Politics of Conflict over Oil in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria: A Review of the Corporate Social Responsibility Strategies of the Oil Companies. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(4):383-392. doi: 10.12691/education-3-4-1.

Correspondence to: Beloveth  Odochi Nwankwo, Department of Humanities, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom. Email: belovethodo@yahoo.com

Abstract

This article evaluates the nature of corporate social responsibility related oil conflict with emphasis on the key reasons for the conflict in the Niger Delta region that has remained impoverished despite the region's huge contributions to the Nigerian economy for many decades. The problem is that the region has been underdeveloped despite its contributions to the national economy. In fact, observations show that the corporate social responsibility projects of the oil companies are inadequate and therefore require a change of strategy. The methodology is a combination of the qualitative data, especially secondary and primary sources including observation of the situation in some oil producing communities, and also the use of the Nigeria Watch database which identifies the sources and maps and the trends of violent deaths in the country. From observations, the resistant movements were formed in the region to address environmental rights violations and enhance economic development. In terms of theoretical and practical significance, the study argues, based on the stakeholder's theory that there is a direct relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and conflict, considering the disconnect between the community development projects and the actualisation of human needs. Their capacity to differentiate between what the people want and their actual needs would end the attacks on the oil workers by restive youths. The article has suggested possible ways of resolving this conflict.

Keywords

References

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Article

Different but the Same: Doctoral Students' Experience of Multiprofessional Education

1Sheffield Hallam University, Centre for Health and Social Care Research, 32 Collegiate Crescent, Sheffield, UK


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(4), 393-398
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-4-2
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Hilary Piercy, Frances Gordon. Different but the Same: Doctoral Students' Experience of Multiprofessional Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(4):393-398. doi: 10.12691/education-3-4-2.

Correspondence to: Hilary  Piercy, Sheffield Hallam University, Centre for Health and Social Care Research, 32 Collegiate Crescent, Sheffield, UK. Email: h.piercy@shu.ac.uk

Abstract

Generic Professional Doctorate programmes provide students with the opportunity to study in multiprofessional cohorts. Although the professional doctorate student experience has been examined, the value of engaging in multiprofessional doctoral education has not been explored. The study aimed to explore the personal meanings that doctoral students ascribe to the value of studying within a multiprofessional context. A qualitative approach was employed. Data were collected through focus group discussions and individual interviews. A thematic analysis was conducted on the data. 23 doctoral students over four years of the programme participated in the study. Different but the same was a major theme that emerged from the data. The multiprofessional context and the 'difference' between the students offered identifiable enhancements to the academic process which were captured in three subthemes; 1) finding new worlds 2) getting clear and being clear and 3) travelling alone together. The study findings suggest that the multiprofessional context, mediated through a pedagogical approach of the contact hypothesis, enhanced the quality of the educational experience and outcomes.

Keywords

References

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[2]  Scott, D., Brown, A., Lunt, I & Thorne, L. Professional doctorates: Integrating professional and academic knowledge. Maidenhead, Open University Press. 2004.
 
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[4]  Park, C. Redefining the Doctorate: discussion paper, York, The Higher Education Academy. 2007.
 
[5]  Barr, H. Low, H. Introducing Interprofessional Education. Fareham. Centre for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education, P4. 2013.
 
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Article

The National Minimum Standard on Early Child Care Centers (ECCC) in Nigeria and the Status of Pre-Primary Education in Uhunmwode Local Government Area of Edo State

1Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC) P.M.B. 91 Garki, Abuja


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(4), 399-405
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-4-3
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
ODIAGBE Sunny Ighalo. The National Minimum Standard on Early Child Care Centers (ECCC) in Nigeria and the Status of Pre-Primary Education in Uhunmwode Local Government Area of Edo State. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(4):399-405. doi: 10.12691/education-3-4-3.

Correspondence to: ODIAGBE  Sunny Ighalo, Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC) P.M.B. 91 Garki, Abuja. Email: sodiagbe@yahoo.com

Abstract

Pre-Primary Education Programme has been shown to bring critical gains to children’s social, emotional and cognitive development. The study therefore, Evaluates public Pre-Primary Education in Uhunmwode Local Government Area of Edo state: to find out whether the directive given by the Federal Government to Ministry of Education across the federation to establish PPE in all public primary schools in 2009 has been obeyed and to determine the extent to which they meet the guidelines as spelt out in the National Minimum Standard on Early Child Care Centers (ECCC) of 2007. Six research questions were raised to get the study. The study employed a descriptive survey research. A purposive sampling Techniques of (20) Twenty Pre-primary schools were selected from the 71 public schools with pre-primary school in Uhunmwode Local Government Area of Edo state. One instrument that was used, is a check list based on the contents of the environment models of the Pre-Primary Education as spelt out in the National Minimum Standard for ECCC in Nigeria. The data shows that the Standard of Pre-Primary Education fall short of the expectation that will help Nigeria to attain the desired position among nations of the world. Recommendations were made to the government to; build more classrooms, provide early childhood education curriculum for teachers and provide play facilities in these public pre-primary schools in Uhunmwode Local Government Area to enhance the intellectual, emotional, physical and healthy growth of the children.

Keywords

References

[1]  Ruma, S. A. (2007). Foreword. National Policy for Integrated Early Child hood Development in Nigeria. NERDC Press, Lagos. Ajayi,H. O. (2008) Early Bush, L. (2001). White House Summit on Early Childhood Cognitive Development, in teaching Our Youngest: a guide for preschool teachers and family providers (2002). Washington, DC.
 
[2]  Obiweluozo, E.P. (2011). Language as a Factor and a Necessary Foundation in Early Childhood Education. Nigerian Journal of Teacher Education and Teaching. Vol. 9 No. 1.
 
[3]  Ajayi,H. O. (2008). Early Childhood Education in Nigeria; a reality or a mirage? Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood Volume 9 Number 4 www.wwwords.co.uk/. Retrieved on the 10th March, 2013.
 
[4]  Wikipedia (2011) Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved From Program Evaluation- Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Mht.
 
[5]  UNICEF (2010) the Children-Early Childhood Care and Education. Retrieved on UNICEF Nigeria, Early Childhood Care and Education.
 
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[6]  UNESCO (2002) Early Childhood Care? Development? Education? UNESCO Policy brief on Early childhood. Paris, France.
 
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[8]  Odiagbe, S.I. (2012) An Evaluation of Early Childhood Care and Education in South- South of Nigeria. Edo Journal of Counseling. vol. 5. PP. 60-74
 
[9]  UNESCO ECCE Unit (2002) Children-Early Childhood Care and Education.
 
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[11]  FGN (2004) National Policy on Education. Federal Ministry Education. NERDC Press. Lagos.
 
[12]  Morrison, G.S. (2004) Early Childhood Education Today. New Jersey: Pearson Practice Hall.
 
[13]  UNESCO (2003). Early Childhood Care and Education. UNESCO Policy Brief on Early Childhood. Paris, France.
 
[14]  Odiagbe, S.I (2012). An Evaluation of Early Childhood Care and Education in South-South of Nigeria. Edo Journal of Counseling. Vol. 5. PP. 60-74
 
[15]  Kizlik.B (2012) Measurement, Assessment and Evaluation in Education. Robert Kizlik and Associates Boca Raton, Florida. Retrieved From Http/Www.Adprima.Com Measurement. Htm. On The 30th June, 2012.
 
[16]  Smith, M. K. (2001) 'Evaluation' In the Encyclopedia of Informal Education, Www.Infed.Org/Biblio/B-Eval.Htm.
 
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[18]  Young, J. (1997) Program Evaluation; Background and Methods. Www.Ed.Final.Gov/Prog.Evaluation
 
[19]  Obioma, G. (2007) Foreword. National Minimum Standard for Early Child Care Centres in Nigeria. NERDC Printing Press, Lagos.
 
[20]  Idemudia, P. (2006) Evaluation of Private Pre-Primary in Ovia North East. Unpublished MasterThesis Presented to Department of Educational Psychology Curriculum Studies. University of Benin.
 
[21]  FGN. (2009) Road Map for the Nigerian Educational Sector. Federal Ministry Education. Abuja, Nigeria.
 
[22]  FGN (2007). National Minimum Standard for Early Child Care Centres in Nigeria. NERDC Printing Press, Lagos.
 
[23]  Odinko, M.N. (2005) “Language and Interaction in Pre-Primary Classroom In Nigeria” Paper Presented At Commonwealth Colloquium on Educational Research and Development, Oxford, U.K
 
[24]  Okpala, N.P.(2006)Researching Learning Outcomes at the Basic Educational Level in Nigeria. An Inaugural Lecture presented at the University of Ibadan
 
[25]  Ndukwu,P.N.(2002) School and Teacher Factors as Determinants of Classroom Materials Resource Utilization in Pre-Primary Schools in Lagos State. Unpublished Ph.D Thesis, University Of Ibadan.
 
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Article

Application of Cues, Prompts, Probes, Questions and Gestures (CPPQG) in Physics Teaching and Learning

1Department of Science Education, Adamawa State University, Mubi, Nigeria

2Department of Physics Education, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(4), 406-411
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-4-4
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ugwumba Augustine Okoronka, Kodjo Donkor Taale. Application of Cues, Prompts, Probes, Questions and Gestures (CPPQG) in Physics Teaching and Learning. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(4):406-411. doi: 10.12691/education-3-4-4.

Correspondence to: Kodjo  Donkor Taale, Department of Physics Education, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana. Email: ktaale@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study was an action research using cues, prompts, probes, gestures and questioning strategy to remediate some learning difficulties of students in some physics concepts. This was done by collecting both quantitative and qualitative data using teacher constructed test. Pre-test, was used to assess students’ prior knowledge and post-test to determine the final state of the learners. A sample of 40 Level 200 Geography Education students of the Department of Science Education, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Nigeria, participated in the study. The data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics, percentages, paired sample t-test and the correlation statistic. The results obtained showed an improvement in students’ understanding of basic concepts in optics, heat and mechanics. Students performed relatively better in optics (80% of the students) scoring 45% and higher; followed by thermal physics (heat) (70 %) and mechanics (50%). The post-test mean score was higher than the pre-test. Also, paired sample t-test was significant at 0.05 alpha level and df of 39. Similarly, a moderately high and significant correlation coefficient of 0.70 was calculated between the pre and post test scores. Based on the findings, it is recommended that teachers should integrate CPPQG into all forms of physics instruction in today’s changing world of technologies. This is a major way to make its learning “interesting” to the average learner who ordinarily may not be able to make the kind of “connections” expected in maximizing physics teaching and learning.

Keywords

References

[1]  Bostock, J. (1998). Constructivism in Mass Higher Education: A case study. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 29 (3), 225-240
 
[2]  Duffy, T.M and Jonassen, D.H (1992). Constructivism: New implication for instructional technology in constructivism and the technology of instructional technology, T.M. Duffy and D.H. Jonassen (Eds). Hillsdale, N.J: Erlbaum (p. 1-16)
 
[3]  Okoronka, U.A (2011). The place of cues, prompts, and probes in Science/Physics Classroom. Workshop paper presented at the 52 nd Annual Conference of the Science Teachers’ Association of Nigerian held at Akure from 15-21 August, 2011.
 
[4]  Ausubel, D.P (1963). The Psychology of Meaningful Learning. Newyork: Grune and Stratton
 
[5]  Dollard, J and Miller, N. (1950). Personality and Psychotherapy. New York: Mc Grew Hill.
 
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[7]  Walberg, H., and Paik, S. (2000). Effective educational practices. Brussels, Belgium: International Academy Education. Retrieved September 2009 from: http://www.ibe.unesco.org/fileadmin/user_upload/archive/publications/EducationalPractices SeriesPdf/prac03e.pdf
 
[8]  Frey, N., and Fisher, D. (2011). Guiding learning: Questions, prompts, and cues. Principal Leadership, 11 (5), 58-60.
 
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[10]  Tienken, C.H., Goldberg, S. and DiRocco, D. (2009). Questioning the questions. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 46 (1), 39-43.
 
[11]  Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
 
[12]  Caram, C.A. and Davis, P.B. (2005). Inviting student engagement with questioning. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 42 (1), 19-23.
 
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[14]  Elder, L. and Paul, R. (2003). Critical thinking: Teaching students how to study and learn. Journal of Developmental Education, 27 (2), 36-38.
 
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[16]  Walsh, J. A. and Sattes, B. D. (2005). Quality questioning: Researchbased practice to engage every learner. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
 
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[20]  Huitt, W., Monetti, D., and Hummel, J. (2009). Designing direct instruction. In C. Reigeluth and A. Carr-Chellman, Instructional-design theories and models: Volume III, Building a common knowledge base [73-97]. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved from http://www.edpsycinteractive.org/papers/designing-direct-instruction.pdf
 
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Article

A Case Study on Action Research: Barri Gòtic Barcelona

1Department of Social Sciences, ELISAVA Escola Superior en Disseny – UPF, Barcelona, Spain


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(4), 412-417
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-4-5
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Xavi Camino, Albert Fuster. A Case Study on Action Research: Barri Gòtic Barcelona. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(4):412-417. doi: 10.12691/education-3-4-5.

Correspondence to: Xavi  Camino, Department of Social Sciences, ELISAVA Escola Superior en Disseny – UPF, Barcelona, Spain. Email: xcamino@elisava.net

Abstract

The Design Degree program at Elisava Escuela Superior de Diseño e Ingeniería de Barcelona includes tools and mechanisms to focus students on the users, the social context and communication. The idea behind this is that greater density should be sought in the projects and a fabric of relationships should be generated in a social and geographical environment ranging from the most local to the most global. As part of its “Products, context and user” subject, Elisava planned action research during the 2010-11 academic year between a group of graphic design students and the members of the 'Asociación de vecinos del barri Gòtic' (AVVBG or Gothic Quarter Community Association), the Gothic Quarter being the district of Barcelona where the School is situated. As the AVVBG has few members, it considered the need to develop new communicative strategies. The teachers provided the students with the traditional social science methods (documentary sources, participant observation, in-depth interviews) with two goals: the first, that they might become deeply aware of the district's social reality, its relationship with the rest of the city and the true needs of the AVVBG (diagnosis); and the second, to establish bonds with the members of the AVVBG that would lead to starting spaces for reflection, joint creation and joint participation in designing the association’s new communication strategies. The changes between the students' first proposal made with the typical conventional project methodology, and the following, after the action research and the users, students and tutors' reply, give a good account of the values and challenges of this methodology and enable design discipline self reflection.

Keywords

References

[1]  The critical theory was developed by philosophers from the Frankfurt School, such as T. Adorno, M. Horkeimer and H. Marcuse, in the mid-20th-century, concern for the growing power of influence of the positivist focus of science as an ideology on 20th century Society. Later this was extended and consolidated by the approaches of critical social science made by J. Habermas in several works, such as Conocimiento e interés (1982), Teoría y praxis (1997), Teoría de la acción comunicativa (1987). Generally, critical theory, as W. Carr and S. Kemmis (1988: 146) say, tends to “express a focus of theory that proposes the central mission of emancipating people from the domination of positivist thought through their own understandings and acts”.
 
[2]  W. Carr and S. Kemmis (1988) or J. Elliot (1990), amongst others, have taken critical social science to the field of education through the methodological focus they have called research-action. In general lines, this focus says that in order to produce emancipating or education-transforming knowledge, it is necessary not to separate research in the field of education from the educational praxis itself, and that it is essential to include the participation and collaboration of all agents involved in education (teachers, students, parents, institutions) in the research-action process. T. Eckes, The Developmental Social Psychology of Gender, Lawrence Erlbaum, 2000. [E-book] Available: netLibrary e-book.
 
[3]  Carr, Wilfred; Kemmis, Stephen. Teoría crítica de la enseñanza. La investigación-acción en la formación del profesorado. Martínez Roca, Barcelona, 1988.
 
[4]  Cócola, Agustín. El barrio Gótico de Barcelona. Planificación del pasado e imagen de marca. Generic Publishers, Barcelona, 2011.
 
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Article

Attaining Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in the Primary School Classroom

1Teacher Trainer for the Italian Ministry of Education In-service Further Education Programs in Italy


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(4), 418-426
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-4-6
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nancy Bailey. Attaining Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in the Primary School Classroom. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(4):418-426. doi: 10.12691/education-3-4-6.

Correspondence to: Nancy  Bailey, Teacher Trainer for the Italian Ministry of Education In-service Further Education Programs in Italy. Email: redigranbailey@yahoo.it

Abstract

In consideration of the need for pupils to start using English as a second language (L2) beyond the 2-3 hour a week compulsory “English lesson” in Italian primary schools, the new Italian National Curriculum Guidelines encourage multilingual education. This official stimulus could lead to the achievement of a more bilingual classroom with increased usage of English throughout the school day, especially through the use of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) strategies. However, teachers are often at a loss as to how to accomplish this. They must be helped to realize that it can be easier than they think, especially through the use of new technologies, and in spite of what they consider to be inadequate preparation. They need clear, practical indications of easy, brief activities that they can carry out daily in English in their classrooms in the various subject areas and they need to be familiar with the multimedia opportunities that exist to achieve this goal. This experimental project presents practical, flexible materials and ideas that can be used to introduce topics or to revise contents in all subjects while encouraging the use of L2 instead of Italian (L1). The materials developed can be easily adapted for use in other foreign languages (L2) and in lower secondary education for a third foreign language (L3) (CEFR 0-A1). This CLIL project aims to facilitate primary school teachers’ introduction of English into all subjects. This paper was presented at the 9th International CLIL Conference, Think CLIL 2014, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Venice, Italy, 28-30 August 2014.

Keywords

References

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