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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

Article

Teaching Professionalism and the Feminisation Debate in Pakistan

1Middlesex University London


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(12A), 45-53
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-12A-8
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Shabana Shamaas Gul Khattak. Teaching Professionalism and the Feminisation Debate in Pakistan. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(12A):45-53. doi: 10.12691/education-2-12A-8.

Correspondence to: Shabana  Shamaas Gul Khattak, Middlesex University London. Email: shabanakhattak@hotmail.com

Abstract

This study focuses on teaching professionalism with special reference to its feminisation debate. Professionalism and professional development of teachers is an important discussion to unpack perspectives as to its definition in order to understand the entry points of professionalism and its feminisation arguments. Furthermore this research contains a discussion and analysis regarding the factors that influenced in shaping of teaching profession and professional development in Pakistan and the theories behind the present concept of feminisation of teaching professionals in social set-up. There are many hypothesis involved in the creation of teaching professionalism in Pakistan however for the purpose of this study only historical, political, religious and socio-cultural factors of teaching professionalism are evaluated. The study concludes that the British colonised education moulded the professional development of teachers towards English education, religion and socio-culture forces played a pivotal role in its feminisation context while it is the most respectable and desirable profession for women nevertheless last choice for merit-worthy capable people due to lack of standards and credibility of educational provision and low-level of training skills; uneven practices of recruitment and promotions and low salaries packages.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Dual Consequence of Discursive Practices on both the Learning and the Education in University’s Evaluation Practices

1Humanities Department, University of the French West Indies and Guiana, Schœlcher, 97232, Martinique


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(1), 54-61
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-1-11
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Michel DISPAGNE. The Dual Consequence of Discursive Practices on both the Learning and the Education in University’s Evaluation Practices. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(1):54-61. doi: 10.12691/education-3-1-11.

Correspondence to: Michel  DISPAGNE, Humanities Department, University of the French West Indies and Guiana, Schœlcher, 97232, Martinique. Email: Michel.Dispagne@martinique.univ-ag.fr

Abstract

This article is about the observation of a French institute of high education, the one of University of the French West Indies and Guiana. This institute is based in the American-Caribbean area and composed of three universities, based on three different French territories: Guiana, Guadeloupe and Martinique. The reflection concerns a discourses’ corpus within training in Master’s degree (MA, MS/MSc), that is also specific to the European higher education system. The discursive exploitation refers to the analysis of both the results of assessments that students obtained during the period 2009-2013 and the discourses of students and academics that intervene in the Master. The reflection enables to apprehend the uneasiness resulting of the gap between the ideal expected profile and the actual profile of the student in postgraduate training. Face this fact, we hypothesize that failures and even the lack of certain knowledge that appears at the necessary prerequisites to the two years of Master undertaken. The fact remains that in terms of results, various verbal reactions proceeding of the students’ language practice from one year to another, between 2009 and 2012, converge towards a same discourse namely that the operated investments, then the efforts realized have a low and even an absence of impact on the respective learning paths but also on the results obtained at the end of the assessments. Moreover, this discourse is not specific to the students that obtained the more disappointing results and therefore are referred. Actually, it is also the discourse of the students that are admitted. This can be explained by the fact that, indeed, notes given are beyond 10/20, the average note; however they are closed to it. This implies a success that appears very modest compared to the excellence expected.

Keywords

References

[1]  The document of the university is composed of registered statistical tables of admitted and referred students coming from twelve courses (English, Spanish, French Literature, Creole, History, Geography, Infocom, Educational Sciences, FFL, ESL, plastics and Translation Studies Arts) representing two levels of training: L and M and providing figures on four academic years. The table does not provide data for all students enrolled in the Master 2 in the 2012-2013 academic year. This lack of data is due to the fact that most of students have not supported their memory and therefore had no note, which has prevent from knowing the exact statistics about the admitted students and the referred students of M2.
 
[2]  Document belonging to the administration of the Department of Humanities and published in December 2012.
 
[3]  This small corpus of words is a copy of what is constantly heard in many educational meetings of academics in the field and / or during deliberations about students’ assessments conducted at the end of the semester by the academics team itself.
 
[4]  Engineering of Integration Actions and Local Development
 
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[7]  «La didactique professionnelle”.
 
[8]  Les savoirs tacites: «si les salariés savaient tout ce qu’ils savent !”.
 
[9]  L’entretien d’explicitation en formation continue et initiale.
 
[10]  Course offered at UQAM (Université du Qubébec à Montréal) in a vocational and technical training.
 
[11]  «La didactique professionnelle et le travail de l’enseignant”
 
[12]  «Regards sur l’activité en situation”.
 
[13]  «Construire les compétences individuelles et collectives”.
 
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[17]  État des savoirs sur les relations sur les relations entre les étudiants, les enseignants et les IATOSS dans les établissements d’enseignements supérieurs, Paris: Observatoire de la Vie Étudiante (OVE).
 
[18]  Laure Endrizzi, citant Knight et al. «C‘est la formation informelle qui prédomine dans les pratiques du développement professionnel: c’est en enseignant qu’on apprend à enseigner”, Studies in Higher Education, 2006, vol. 31, N°3, p. 319-339.
 
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Article

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (Tvet): Model for Addressing Skills Shortage in Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry

1DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS EDUCATION DELTA STATE UNIVERSITY ABRAKA, NIGERIA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(1), 62-66
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-1-12
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
AYONMIKE. CHINYERE SHIRLEY. Technical and Vocational Education and Training (Tvet): Model for Addressing Skills Shortage in Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(1):62-66. doi: 10.12691/education-3-1-12.

Correspondence to: AYONMIKE.  CHINYERE SHIRLEY, DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS EDUCATION DELTA STATE UNIVERSITY ABRAKA, NIGERIA. Email: chinyereshirley@ymail.com

Abstract

The purpose of the study is to ascertain the role of TVET stakeholders and the oil and gas industry in addressing skills shortage in the Nigerian oil and gas industries. Survey research design was used in this study and 300 respondents were drawn from TVET departments in tertiary institutions and technical colleges in Delta State, Nigeria. Two research questions were asked and two Null hypotheses were stated. A questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire was validated by three lecturers. Using test-retest method, Cronbach reliability co-efficient of 0.81 was obtained. Data were analysed using mean for research questions and ANOVA at 0.05 level of significance for testing hypotheses. The study revealed amongst others that TVET stakeholders should identify the area of skills needs of oil and gas industry, review TVET curriculum content by integrating oil and gas courses into TVET programmes and the introduction of intensive oil and gas practical and training for TVET teachers and students through an effective partnership between TVET institutions and oil and gas industries in Nigeria. Hence it was recommended that there should be collaboration between TVET institutions and oil and gas industries.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Influence of Emotional Intelligence, Creativity, Work Ethic, to Service Quality of High School Library in the Minahasa Regency

1Universitas Negeri Manado FATEK - PKK, Tondano-Manado, Indonesia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(1), 67-79
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-1-13
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sylvana M.D. Maukar. The Influence of Emotional Intelligence, Creativity, Work Ethic, to Service Quality of High School Library in the Minahasa Regency. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(1):67-79. doi: 10.12691/education-3-1-13.

Correspondence to: Sylvana  M.D. Maukar, Universitas Negeri Manado FATEK - PKK, Tondano-Manado, Indonesia. Email: maukar.sylvana@yahoo.co.id

Abstract

The research objective was to prove the influence of emotional intelligence, creativity, work ethic to service quality of the high school library in the Minahasa Regency. This Research using quantitative approach with a survey method and the test hypothesis using Path Analysis. The population in this research are all of the librarians in the high school library of Minahasa regency. The samples in this research were the librarians with the amount of 70 respondents, that were taken technically simple random sampling. The result of the research and the test of hypothesis show that: (1) There is direct positive influence of the emotional intelligence toward the service quality of high school library in the Minahasa Regency. (2) There is direct positive influence of the creativity toward the service quality of high school libraries in the Minahasa Regency. (3) There is direct positive influence of the work ethic toward the service quality of the high school l ibraries in the Minahasa Regency. (4) There is direct positive influence of emotional intelligence toward the work ethic of high school libraries in the Minahasa Regency. (5) There is direct positive influence of the creativity toward the work ethic of high school libraries in the Minahasa Regency.

Keywords

References

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Article

Does Team Autonomy Increase or Decrees Team Implementation? The Role of Team Learning

1Department of Health Care Systems Management; Yezreel Valley College, Israel


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(1), 80-85
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-1-14
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sarit Rashkovits. Does Team Autonomy Increase or Decrees Team Implementation? The Role of Team Learning. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(1):80-85. doi: 10.12691/education-3-1-14.

Correspondence to: Sarit  Rashkovits, Department of Health Care Systems Management; Yezreel Valley College, Israel. Email: Saritr@yvc.ac.il

Abstract

As the necessity for teams to implement different innovations is prominent, the study addresses the question of the effect of team autonomy on teams' innovation implementation. Team autonomy is usually considered as a beneficial job characteristic but it is still unclear whether it aligns with the necessity to make teams implement new technologies, work methods or other innovations. We argue for a positive effect of team autonomy on teams' innovation implementation through the process of team learning. The results from a sample of 61 work teams (414 employees- 61 team leaders and 353 team members) from different organizations support our hypotheses. The results indicate that team autonomy facilitates team learning, that team learning facilitates team implementation, and that team autonomy positively affects team innovation via team learning.

Keywords

References

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Article

English for University Students in Ethiopia: Implications of the Needs Analysis at Haramaya University, Ethiopia

1M.A in TEFL, Abubeker Preparatory School, Ethiopia

2M.A in TEFL, Haramaya University, Ethiopia

3PhD in Literature and Language, Haramaya University, Ethiopia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(1), 86-92
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-1-15
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Biniam Teka Gelan, Adinew Tadesse Degago, Deepika Nelson. English for University Students in Ethiopia: Implications of the Needs Analysis at Haramaya University, Ethiopia. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(1):86-92. doi: 10.12691/education-3-1-15.

Correspondence to: Adinew  Tadesse Degago, M.A in TEFL, Haramaya University, Ethiopia. Email: adinew_tadesse@yahoo.com

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to assess the English language needs of university students in a context, where English is used as the medium of instruction and general English courses are taught across all disciplines. To achieve this purpose, based on Hutchinson & Water’s target needs analysis approach, a 5-Point Likert Scale needs analysis questionnaires were designed and distributed to 152 medical science students at Haramaya university to determine the students’ frequency of English language use, their perceived importance of English for academic studies, their English language lacks, and areas of English they want training in. In addition, the general course materials taught to the students were evaluated to determine their suitability to the English need of the students. Descriptive statistics were employed in analyzing the quantitative data while content analysis was applied in analyzing the qualitative data. The results indicated the perceived importance of English for the students’ academic studies, their English language lacks and area in which they want training in. In addition, the study identified the inadequacy of the general English courses to meet the students’ English language needs. The study suggests that there is a need for English courses with an ESP orientation to meet the specific needs of students in their academic studies.

Keywords

References

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Article

Structural Relationships among the Factors Affecting Adolescents’ Happiness in OECD countries: Application of QCA method

1Chungbuk National University, Cheongju City, Korea, Sangmyung University, Cheonan City, Korea


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(1), 93-99
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-1-16
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Young-Chool Choi, Ji-Hyun Jang. Structural Relationships among the Factors Affecting Adolescents’ Happiness in OECD countries: Application of QCA method. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(1):93-99. doi: 10.12691/education-3-1-16.

Correspondence to: Ji-Hyun  Jang, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju City, Korea, Sangmyung University, Cheonan City, Korea. Email: ycchoi@cbu.ac.kr

Abstract

This study aims to investigate the causal relationships among the key factors related to education that affect the happiness of adolescents, to find combinations of conditions explaining adolescents’ happiness in OECD countries, and to put forward policy implications whereby OECD countries may raise their levels of adolescent happiness. The HBSC (Health Behaviour in School-aged Children) score of adolescents of OECD countries was selected as an indicator for happiness, and some independent variables such as per capita GDP, per capita educational expenditure amount were included in the subject of analysis. QCA (Qualitative Comparative Analysis) method was employed for the analysis. Research results show that there are six configurations and three selected prime implicants explaining the high happiness score of adolescents in OECD countries. Three prime implicants are TEPC*GDP*PUPTEA, tee*GDP*PRIVATEXP, and tee*tepc*gdp*privatexp. In other words, while there are a number of further steps required to obtain a more parsimonious expression, in this research the suggestions posed by the solution are six configurations and three prime implicants explaining adolescents’ happiness in OECD countries. The first prime implicant is a combination of TEPC(high total per capita expenditure on education)*GDP(high per capita gdp)*PUPTEA(high ratio of students to teaching staff). The second implicant is a combination of tee(low total expenditure on education)*GDP(high per capita gdp)*PRIVATEXP(high ratio of private source expenditure on education to gdp). Finally, the third implicant is a combination of tee(low total expenditure on education)*tepc(low total per capita expenditure on education)*gdp(low per capita gdp)*privatexp(low ratio of private source expenditure on education to gdp). It is important to note that the results presented in this paper are illustrative only and need to be investigated in a more comprehensive perspective. Rather than being a limitation of QCA, consideration of alternative causal configurations are appropriate for the complexity of adolescents’ happiness.

Keywords

References

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Article

Knowledge Models as Meaningful and Long Life Learning Alternative for Rare Disease Affected Students

1Universidad Pública de Navarra, España


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(1), 100-108
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-1-17
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Maider Pérez de Villarreal, Noemí Cano, Fermín González. Knowledge Models as Meaningful and Long Life Learning Alternative for Rare Disease Affected Students. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(1):100-108. doi: 10.12691/education-3-1-17.

Correspondence to: Maider  Pérez de Villarreal, Universidad Pública de Navarra, España. Email: maider.perezdevillarreal@unavarra.es

Abstract

Rare diseases (RDs) are considered all diseases affecting to less than or equal to 5 in 10.000 citizens, criteria followed by most European Countries. Since most RDs incur disabling conditions, a few patients seldom reach adult life or attend class regularly. However, there are some less serious conditions which are compatible with a better quality of life during childhood and youth and which allow students attend classes in a more regular way. During this period and in these cases, we suggest the possibility of using the software Cmap Tools in order to create knowledge models, so that RD affected students who may miss classes due to their health status, can reach their fellows and follow their teachers’ explanations without any particular curriculum adaptation. In the context of a natural science class addressing health and illnesses, we suggest the possibility of using concept maps and V diagrams as tools for getting meaningful and long life learning. Once they learn the basis for creating basic concept maps, RD affected students and their mates may learn some of the symptoms, difficulties of diagnostic, treatment possibilities, foundations and research groups of the most common RDs held in Navarra (Spain), through concept maps. We show an educative intervention in a primary school in Navarra in which one of the students is affected by Treacher Collins and through the presentation of her disease, the rest of the students will get to know the characteristics of this particular disease and will make them be more empathic with her and her immediate reality, making RDs sound less rare. In the other side, by means of this teaching-learning process, RD affected students feel the main characters and also more valuable for society, which increases their self-esteem. By promoting this type of activities, teachers will manage a creative tool which help them in both emotional and professional aspects, since they do not have to adapt the curriculum to a particular student because Knowledge models allow the continuation of the learning process. Finally, the use of Cmap Tools provides items to measure what students knew previously about a particular topic and also helps them appreciate how their cognitive structure has changed and developed regarding their previous knowledge, stimulating a meaningful and long life learning and avoiding conceptual misconceptions.

Keywords

References

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Article

Short Story Text in Project-Based Learning Model on 7th Graders

1Ministry of Education and Culture, Language Center, Jakarta, Indonesia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(2), 109-115
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-2-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Dra. Exti Budihastuti. Short Story Text in Project-Based Learning Model on 7th Graders. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(2):109-115. doi: 10.12691/education-3-2-1.

Correspondence to: Dra.  Exti Budihastuti, Ministry of Education and Culture, Language Center, Jakarta, Indonesia. Email: extibm_27@yahoo.com

Abstract

Mid-2013 the world of education in Indonesia was preoccupied with curriculum changes. Curriculum 2013 replaced the previous, namely Curriculum 2006 or KTSP (school-based curriculum). In line with the changes, there is also a change in the Indonesian language learning, namely a text-based learning. To enhance the mindset of teachers and students in learning Indonesian, the author tries to outline the project-based learning model with short stories in class VII of Junior High School (SMP). Project-based learning is a learning model that uses project / activity as a learning process to achieve competency of attitudes, knowledge, and skills. The emphasis of the learning lays on learners activity to produce output by applying the skills of researching, analyzing, creating, up to presenting their products based on real-life experience. Meanwhile, the short story is a work of literary prose that tells story. It is categorized as prose because it is not bound by a particular form (free). Judging from the contents which tells story, short story is classyfield into epic category (storytelling). The term of short stories emerges from the point of view of a storybeing told conciseness. This paper aims to provide rocommendation advice to the world of education in Indonesia, especially on Indonesian language and literature learning of class VII.

Keywords

References

[1]  Bahasa Indonesia Wahana Pengetahuan/Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan.
 
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Article

Exploration of Students’ Misconceptions in Mechanics using the FCI

1LIEA, CESI, Assat, France

2LIEA, CESI, Montpellier, France


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(2), 116-120
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-2-2
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Géraldine Poutot, Bernard Blandin. Exploration of Students’ Misconceptions in Mechanics using the FCI. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(2):116-120. doi: 10.12691/education-3-2-2.

Correspondence to: Bernard  Blandin, LIEA, CESI, Montpellier, France. Email: bblandin@cesi.fr

Abstract

During 3 years, we have used the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) to assess the progress of our First-Year students in Engineering in mastering the concepts of Newtonian Physics and to compare the efficiency of two teaching methods, courses and drills versus Problem-Based Learning. If both methods lead to quite similar deceptive results, the detailed analysis of the response to each question of the test allowed us to identify our students’ most common misconceptions. This paper presents this research and discusses our findings.

Keywords

References

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