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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Editor-in-Chief: Freddie W. Litton

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

Google-based Impact Factor: 1.27   Citations

Article

Supervisors’ Experience and Area of Specialization as Determinats of the Quality of Students’ Project Report Writing Skills in Tertiary Institutions

1Integrated Science Department, Federal College of Education, Abeokuta, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(10), 720-724
doi: 10.12691/education-4-10-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mukail A. Olalekan Sotayo. Supervisors’ Experience and Area of Specialization as Determinats of the Quality of Students’ Project Report Writing Skills in Tertiary Institutions. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(10):720-724. doi: 10.12691/education-4-10-2.

Correspondence to: Mukail  A. Olalekan Sotayo, Integrated Science Department, Federal College of Education, Abeokuta, Nigeria. Email: maosotayo@gmail.com

Abstract

Project report writing is important and compulsory for every final year student in tertiary institutions, however adequate attention has not been given to the supervision of project report writing. Some teething problems always accompany project report writing. This expo-facto study therefore seeks to investigate the effects of supervisors’ experience and area of specialization on the quality of students’ project report writing skills. The population for the study comprised all the 60 supervisors in the school of science, out of which 42 were sampled. One research question and three hypotheses were formulated for this study. The main hypotheses raised were: the quality of students’ project report is not significantly affected by Supervisors Experience and the quality of students’ project report is not significantly affected by Supervisors Area of specialization. The results show that there was significant main effect of supervisors’ experience on the quality of students’ project report and also there was significant main effect of supervisors’ area of specialization on the quality of students’ project report. As a result of these findings, it was recommended that there should be a format for project writing, research report requirements/ guidelines should be part of students’ handbook and mentoring should be encouraged in project supervision.

Keywords

References

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[9]  Morgan S. L, Preparing a Research Report. Committee on Professional Training. ACS. Chemistry for Life, 1-4. (2015).
 
[10]  Gallacher, K.K, Supervision, Mentoring and Coaching method for supporting personnel development. Performing personnel preparation in early intervention: issues models and practical strategies. Ed Winton P.J; McCollum, J.A & Catlett, C. Paul. H Brookes publishing co. Baltimore. 191-196. (1997).
 
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Article

The Role of Bibliotherapy in Reduction of Violence in Arab Schools in Israel

1Graduate Studies: Al-Qasemi Academy, Israel


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(10), 725-730
doi: 10.12691/education-4-10-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jamal Abu-Hussain. The Role of Bibliotherapy in Reduction of Violence in Arab Schools in Israel. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(10):725-730. doi: 10.12691/education-4-10-3.

Correspondence to: Jamal  Abu-Hussain, Graduate Studies: Al-Qasemi Academy, Israel. Email: Jamal_ah@qsm.ac.il

Abstract

For many societies violence has become a major problem to be immediately dealt with and overcome. Schools, for reasons ranging from their framework, structure, client population and lack of appropriate educational tools suffer from manifestations of this phenomenon no less than other societal institutions and much more than some. This state of affairs leaves teachers, in general, and Arab teachers in Israel in particular, utterly frustrated and in many cases extremely helpless and bewildered. The situation calls for fast intervention in order to find suitable educational solutions for the reality of Arab teachers and Arab schools that function as a minority with its own set of values, standards and distinguishing features within general Israeli society. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of group bibliotherapy on violence among Arab elementary school children in Israeli society. The study hypothesis is that group bibliotherapy diminishes violence among aggressive children. The study sample included 60 pupils from grades one to six in one Arab elementary school in Israel. The results show a decline in the level of violence among aggressive children that went through bibliotherapy, in comparison with aggressive children that did not receive bibliotherapy. Results suggest that school violence can be mitigated significantly by use of appropriate teacher training programs. Lack of such training and the experience it furnishes may encourage a violent and dangerous environment for the pupils. The program furnished teachers with a tool for successful handling of the violence.

Keywords

References

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Article

Chemistry Teaching in a STSE Perspective: A School Project

1Centre for Studies on Education and Training (CEEF/CeiEF), Lusófona University, Porto, Portugal


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(10), 731-735
doi: 10.12691/education-4-10-4
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Cláudia Margarida Simões, Maria de Nazaré Castro Trigo Coimbra. Chemistry Teaching in a STSE Perspective: A School Project. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(10):731-735. doi: 10.12691/education-4-10-4.

Correspondence to: Maria  de Nazaré Castro Trigo Coimbra, Centre for Studies on Education and Training (CEEF/CeiEF), Lusófona University, Porto, Portugal. Email: nazarecoimbra@email.com

Abstract

This study focuses on environmental education in school, based on a work project with a laboratorial component. Thus, it is intended to disclose part of a wider research on the evaluation of an intervention project in the local environment, developed by students of a secondary school in the north of Portugal. The research is qualitative in nature, and it is focused on the discursive textual analysis of the report made by the coordinator of a school project and in the reports of students. The results show more awareness by young people, despite some difficulties in scientific writing and dissemination of results. Overall, there is a positive assessment of the project, the deepening of students´ scientific literacy and their commitment to a sustainable development of the local environment.

Keywords

References

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