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Article

Effect of Blended Learning on Newly Nursing Student's Outcomes Regarding New Trends in Nursing Subject at Ain Shams University

1Assisst. Prof. of Community Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Ain Shams University

2Assisst. Prof. of Medical Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Ain Shams University


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1036-1043
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-6
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Fathia Ahmed Mersal, Nahed Ahmed Mersal. Effect of Blended Learning on Newly Nursing Student's Outcomes Regarding New Trends in Nursing Subject at Ain Shams University. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1036-1043. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-6.

Correspondence to: Fathia  Ahmed Mersal, Assisst. Prof. of Community Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Ain Shams University. Email: khomarkh@yahoo.com

Abstract

Blended learning refers to a method of instruction that utilizes two or more complementary approaches to teach the same material. By combining classroom lectures, activities, discussions, and/or web-based modules. Aim: Examine the effect of blended learning on newly nursing student's outcomes regarding new trends in nursing subject at Ain Shams University. Hypothesis: The Students who will be exposed to blended learning (Study group) will have improved Outcomes compared to the Students in the control group who will be exposed to lecture regarding new trends in nursing subject. Design: A quasi experimental study design was utilized to accomplish the aim of this study. Setting: Faculty of Nursing Ain Shams University Cairo Egypt. Sample: Two purposive samples of all available first year students' from the previously mentioned study setting in 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 academic years as control group and study group respectively. Students were included in this study were from both gender, and willing to participate in the study. Tools for data collection: A self-administered structured questionnaire to assess demographic characteristics and learning needs, student's satisfaction questionnaire sheet, student's academic achievement sheet. Results: There was improvement regarding satisfactory level of achievement and decrease in the percent of poor and very poor of blended learning group with no statistical difference between two groups. There was improvement in student's satisfaction of blended learning group regarding the course and teaching method with highly statistical significant difference between two groups. Conclusions: blended learning improved newly nursing student's Outcomes both academic achievement and student's satisfaction than lecture regarding new trends in nursing subject at Ain Shams University. Recommendations: blended learning can be used to facilitate nursing education, more researches done to determine durability rate of the information of this methods.

Keywords

References

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Article

Teacher Training and the Development of First Language Reading Strategies

1Centre for Studies on Education and Training (CEEF/CeiEF), Lusófona University of Oporto, Portugal, Rua Augusto Rosa, Porto, Portugal


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1044-1049
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-7
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Carla Dimitre Dias Alves, Maria de Nazaré Castro Trigo Coimbra. Teacher Training and the Development of First Language Reading Strategies. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1044-1049. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-7.

Correspondence to: Maria  de Nazaré Castro Trigo Coimbra, Centre for Studies on Education and Training (CEEF/CeiEF), Lusófona University of Oporto, Portugal, Rua Augusto Rosa, Porto, Portugal. Email: nazarecoimbra@net.vodafone.pt

Abstract

This study concerns the professional development of first language teachers, in order to improve students´ reading skills. The research analyzes the implementation of The National Programme for Portuguese Teaching (NPPT), in primary schools, as well as its influence on teacher training. It is important to determine whether teachers’ reflective practices, about reading strategies, can improve students’ reading skills, as a result of continuous professional training. The study took place in 2012, in primary schools of Oporto, Portugal, using both quantitative and qualitative data, including a questionnaire and categorical analysis of teachers’ portfolios. The results show that the NPPT Programme helped to train teachers who, by changing and innovating their practices, improved primary students’ reading skills. Furthermore, the study confirmsthat teachers need continuous training, in order to strengthen first language reading strategies and improve teaching practices, using school community resources.

Keywords

References

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Article

An Exploration of the Effects of College EnglishTeacher Misbehaviors on Students’ Willingnessto Communicate in English Classes

1National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung City, Taiwan R.O.C.


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1050-1059
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-8
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Lisa Hsu. An Exploration of the Effects of College EnglishTeacher Misbehaviors on Students’ Willingnessto Communicate in English Classes. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1050-1059. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-8.

Correspondence to: Lisa  Hsu, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung City, Taiwan R.O.C.. Email: hsu31280@gmail.com

Abstract

This study aims to investigate teachers’ inappropriate teaching misbehaviors in relation to students’ willingness to communicate (WTC) in English classes by positing a mediational effect of students’ affective learning. This study argues instead of an indirect effect on students’ affective learning from teachers’ misbehaviors—derisiveness, incompetence, irresponsibility, and non-immediacy—which occur in the classroom and could directly impact students’ WTC. The participants were asked to respond to three instruments designed for this study. Three hypotheses were posed and found that teacher misbehaviors were correlated negatively at a significant level on four aspects of students’ affective learning. Though teacher misbehavior only showed a minor negative relationship with students’ WTC, but SEM analysis indicated that students’ WTC was directly affected by teacher misbehavior than via indirect effect from students’ affective learning. Implications of these findings are addressed. The limitation and future research suggestions are discussed in the end.

Keywords

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Article

Academic Dishonesty/ Corruption in the Period of Technology: Its implication for Quality of Education

1Department of Languages and Communication Studies, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Hawassa University, Ethiopia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1060-1064
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-9
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mebratu Mulatu Bachore. Academic Dishonesty/ Corruption in the Period of Technology: Its implication for Quality of Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1060-1064. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-9.

Correspondence to: Mebratu  Mulatu Bachore, Department of Languages and Communication Studies, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Hawassa University, Ethiopia. Email: mebratumulatu@yahoo.com

Abstract

Cheating has reached alarming proportions in all segments, creating widespread cynicism and an erosion of trust. The root of the problem can be found in our schools, where academic dishonesty is rampant. We, academic communities, are in deep trouble if young people, students, maintain these habits as the next generation. The advancement of technologies, such as cell phones, iPods, internets, has broadened the ways by which people can achieve the goal of cheating. Traditional methods of detection may no longer be wholly successful in fully preventing cheating in examinations. New strategies need to be considered and employed to better manage the advancement of technology use for illegitimate purposes. Therefore, this review article will thoroughly discuss the nature of academic dishonesties (traditional and the ‘modern’ ones), their causes, their diverse natures, the shift from traditional to modern era and measures to be applied to shape the values and attitudes of young people engage in thoughtful, systematic and comprehensive efforts to promote integrity and prevent cheating, especially compatible with the advancement of technology.

Keywords

References

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Article

Music and Tourism: Their Roles in Generating Employment in Nigeria

1Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Federal University Ndufu-Alike Ikwo, Pmb 1010 Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1065-1068
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-10
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
SUNDAY N. NNAMANI. Music and Tourism: Their Roles in Generating Employment in Nigeria. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1065-1068. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-10.

Correspondence to: SUNDAY  N. NNAMANI, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Federal University Ndufu-Alike Ikwo, Pmb 1010 Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Email: sundaynnamani2010@yahoo.com

Abstract

Apart from education, culture is another factor on the wheel of development of any nation. A society is distinguished from another as a result of culture. Culture constitutes the totality of customs, rituals, music, food, patterns of building houses, norms and values that regulate the people’s way of life. Music, festivals and tourist centres are part of culture. This paper examines the role of music in festivals in Nigeria. It noted that specifically that during festivals people travel from far and near, play vital roles in the celebrations as it serves as an important source of information. Festivals are integral parts of tourism. It further examined the extent of development of tourism in Nigeria, types of tourism, investment opportunities available and mentioned some of the tourist sites. Their roles in generating employment were enumerated emphasizing that as labour-intensive industries, they have the potential to create more jobs per unit of investment. There is a conclusion and recommendation urging governments to make investments on music, culture and tourism top priorities in their development agendas.

Keywords

References

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Article

Human Rights and Socialculture: An Exploration

1Department of Education, Shri ram College, MZN, India


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1069-1075
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-11
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Manoj Kumar Choudhary. Human Rights and Socialculture: An Exploration. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1069-1075. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-11.

Correspondence to: Manoj  Kumar Choudhary, Department of Education, Shri ram College, MZN, India. Email: manojchoudhary1000@rediffmail.com

Abstract

Social culture is critical to just about every area of society. The right to culture is meant to secure individual access to the cultural framework dominating the public institutions that have the authority to deliberate, interpret, and enforce human rights. This is made possible through the acquisition of the suitable “cultural equipment” mentioned in the first part of the paper. Such acquisition is a prerequisite for the exercise of the right to cultural participation as well as a range of other individual rights and freedoms similarly recognized inhuman rights law, from this viewpoint, the aim of the article is to focus on the concept of culture and its place in human rights law. This interdisciplinary theoretical understanding of the concept of “culture” serves to redirect attention towards a range of issues that have long been marginalized, but which warrant culture a central place in human rights research and on the international human rights agenda. As a consequence, the main argument developed throughout this paper consists in a summon for the human rights agenda on culture to reaffirm the universal and overarching importance of culture in advancing respect for human rights and to seek to rebalance the present agenda dominated by a right to cultural identity with an urgent emphasis on the fundamental importance of “Cultural equipment” and cultural infrastructure for individual freedom.

Keywords

References

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[44]  Normand and Zaidi, Human Rights at the UN (2008), pp. 40-43.
 
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[48]  Normand and Zaidi, Human Rights at the UN (2008), p. 118. "These proposals were reintroduced in San Francisco during the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Latin America's significant intellectual production supporting human rights is a major reason the region has been called 'the forgotten crucible' of universal human rights. Latin American jurisprudence was particularly well suited to bridging cultural divides in human rights by linking civil and political rights with economic and social rights."
 
[49]  Neier, The International Human Rights Movement (2012), pp. 2-3.
 
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[51]  Normand and Zaidi, Human Rights at the UN (2008), p. 127.
 
[52]  Normand and Zaidi, Human Rights at the UN (2008), pp. 136-138. "A few activists, in particular those whose agenda focused on racial equality and decolonization, were dismayed by the results of San Francisco. The NAACP and allied groups, which had invested significant time, resources, and hopes in using the global forum to highlight the evils of entrenched racism inside the United States and internationally, were bitterly disappointed at the outcome. To no avail, they criticized the failure to dent the vastly unequal power relations operating both between states and within their borders. Rayford Logan, civil rights activist and chair of the history department at Howard University, characterized the human rights articles in the Charter as a 'tragic joke'. But these were minority voices. Just as Roosevelt anticipated, the NGO consultants were thrilled with the role they had played in establishing the organization and fanned out across the country to spread the good news."
 
[53]  Langley, Encyclopedia of Human Rights Issues since 1945 (1999), p. xiv.
 
[54]  See International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 16 December 1966, Art 1, GA Res 2200A(XXI), 21 UN GAOR, 21st Sess, Supp No 16, UN Doc A/6316 (1966); International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, 21 December 1965, opened for signature 7 March 1966, 660 UNTS 195 (entered into force on 4 January 1969); Convention on the Rights of the Child, 20 November 1989, Art 31, 1577 UNTS 44, 49 (entered into force on 2 September 1990).
 
[55]  Journal for Communication and Culture 1, no. 2 (Winter 2011) 45.
 
[56]  From the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man (1948) and the Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights (1994) to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (1981) or the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa (2000).
 
[57]  United Nations, Fact Sheet No 16 (Rev 1), The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights;See also R O.Keefe, “The „right to take part in cultural life. under Article 15 of the ICESCR”, in International and Comparative Law Quarterly, 47, no. 4 (1998): 904.
 
[58]  UNESCO, Our Creative Diversity. Report of the World Commission on Culture and Development (Paris: UNESCO, 1995), 23-24.
 
[59]  United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2004. Cultural Liberty in Today’s Diverse World (New York: United Nations Development Program, 2004). More interest has been offered to the right to enjoy one.s own culture from the viewpoint of minorities, indigenous populations and migrants. It is in this context that the right to culture has developed to signify a right to cultural identity and, possibly, a right to cultural integrity.
 
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Article

A Qualitative Study on Status of Implementation of School Health Programme in South Western Nigeria: Implications for Healthy Living of School Age Children in Developing Countries

1Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1076-1087
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-12
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Oluwakemi M. Ademokun, Kayode O. Osungbade, Taiwo A. Obembe. A Qualitative Study on Status of Implementation of School Health Programme in South Western Nigeria: Implications for Healthy Living of School Age Children in Developing Countries. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1076-1087. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-12.

Correspondence to: Taiwo  A. Obembe, Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Email: tobems@yahoo.com

Abstract

Over the past decade, effective school health programme has attracted much attention in addressing various issues pertaining to school age children. This study assessed the implementation of school health programme in selected public secondary schools in Ibadan metropolis, Nigeria. Key informant interviews of 21 school head teachers were conducted while observational checklist/proforma was used to document the components of school health programme being implemented. Data from key informant interviews were analyzed using thematic approach. The assessment of the implementation of the various components of the school health programme revealed that school-feeding services and sanitary conditions could be better implemented in majority of the schools. Implementation was poor, most especially in the areas of school health services and healthful school environment. Reported reasons for poor implementation from key informant interviews were lack of funds and inadequate health facilities. Concerted efforts are required to intensify awareness campaign on National School Health Policy. The implementation of School Health Programme should be strengthened through advocacy to relevant stakeholders for provision of funds and health facilities.

Keywords

References

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Article

What Matters Most? Determinants of Administrative Effectiveness

1Assistant Professor, GC University, Faisalabad


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1088-1090
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-13
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Khuda Bakhsh, Azhar Mumtaz Saadi, Shafqat Rasso. What Matters Most? Determinants of Administrative Effectiveness. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1088-1090. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-13.

Correspondence to: Khuda  Bakhsh, Assistant Professor, GC University, Faisalabad. Email: gallantup@yahoo.com

Abstract

The study focused on certain factors influencing the effectiveness of Heads of Departments in public sector universities. The researcher developed a questionnaire to measure the determinants and the effectiveness was measured by Leadership Practices Inventory LPI. A sample of five hundreds teachers from twenty one randomly selected universities participated in the study. Regression analysis of the collected data was made to answer ‘How well the selected factors influence the administrative effectiveness of Heads of Departments (HoDs)’. It was found that all the selected factors are positively correlated with administrative effectiveness. Personality Traits proved as strongest determinant followed by organizational climate with significant predictive powers.

Keywords

References

[1]  Ansar,A. (2014). Personal Traits of Khan Tribes. Ghadeer Publishers. Kohat.
 
[2]  Avolio, B., & Bass, B. (2009).Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ). Mind Garden.
 
[3]  Azhar, A. (2013). Factors influencing the administrative behavior. Journal of Educational Administration, 55 (2). 110-121.
 
[4]  DeNeve, K. (2009). The Happy Personality: A meta-analysis of 110 personality traits and subjective wellbeing. Psychological Bulletin, 11 (112-118).
 
[5]  Hughes, L.W. (2011). The Principal as Leader. Second Edition. NJ: Prentice-Hall.
 
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[7]  Mandel, S. (2012). What new teachers really need? The Journal of Educational Leadership, 65 (5), 9-14.
 
[8]  Rubab, Z. (2012). School Climate and job satisfaction among secondary school teachers in Punjab.M.Phil dissertation, Preston University.
 
[9]  Sandeep, C. (2009). Educational Management. Pearson Publishers. New Delhi.
 
[10]  Stronge, J.H., Canto, B. (2012). Qualities of effective principals.Alexanderia, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).
 
[11]  Tanveer, A. (2014). The Challenges in university administration. Journal of Education Policy, Planning and Administration JEPPA, 9 (5), 95-110.
 
[12]  Tanveer, A. (2010). Determinants of job performance in public sector universities of Pakistan. Gomal University Journal of Educational Research, 5 (110-114).
 
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Article

Entanglement of Higher Education and Strength of Open and Distance Learning in Nepal

1Educational technology, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1091-1093
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-14
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jiwak Raj Bajracharya. Entanglement of Higher Education and Strength of Open and Distance Learning in Nepal. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1091-1093. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-14.

Correspondence to: Jiwak  Raj Bajracharya, Educational technology, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan. Email: Jiwakps@gmail.com

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the major entanglement of Higher education in Nepal and to find out the strength of Open and distance learning in Nepalese context. This study was based on empirical literature review including previous research, national and international reports regarding higher education of Nepal, whichhad been studied to investigate the major hurdles and then, analyzed the strength of Open and distance learning to overcome those hurdles. This paper found six major hurdles as 1) Lack of enough educational institutions (universities and campuses) around the country, 2) Limited capacity of admissions at public institutions, 3) Geographical barrier, 4) Highly expensive fees at private institutions, 5) Lack of national educational budgets, and 6) Strikes. Based on the characteristic and application of Open and distance learning, this paper suggests that, those six hurdles could be removed with the appropriate application of ODL programs to increase the strength of higher education in Nepal.

Keywords

References

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Article

Understanding and Responding to the Change of Curriculum in the Context of Indonesian Education

1English Department Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Lambung Mangkurat University Banjarmasin


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(11), 1094-1099
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11-15
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Abdul Muth’im. Understanding and Responding to the Change of Curriculum in the Context of Indonesian Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11):1094-1099. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11-15.

Correspondence to: Abdul  Muth’im, English Department Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Lambung Mangkurat University Banjarmasin. Email: abdulmuthim@yahoo.com

Abstract

The government of the Republic of Indonesia represented by the Ministry of Education and Culture has stipulated that the new curriculum, the 2013 curriculum, should be implemented in all levels of education all over Indonesia starting from 2013-2014 academic year. This change, of course, result in a number of consequences for the stakeholders. One of the stakeholders that will directly experience the consequences most is teachers. The teachers who have begun to feel convenient and be accustomed to with the implementation of the School-Based Curriculum (SBC), suddenly have to shift their mind and teaching practices to this new curriculum. This can make teachers, included English teachers, worried. They are worried if this new curriculum is more complicated to implement than the previous one, the SBC. Actually, the change of curriculum is something common in the world of education. In Indonesia, every eight to nine or ten years, a curriculum changes. That is why the change of curriculum should not be understood as something extraordinary; rather, it should be understood as something common. This perception is important because the way to understand the change of curriculum will influence the way to respond it. If it is thought of as something extraordinary, it should be responded in extraordinary way too. However, if it is considered as a common something it will make teachers’ job be more proportional as well as more professional. This paper tries to discuss and explore the essence of curriculum in general and suggest how Indonesian teachers should respond to the new curriculum, the 2013 curriculum within the context of Indonesian education.

Keywords

References

[1]  Act No. 20 of 2003 Regarding National System of Indonesian Education (Undang-Undang No. 20 Tahun 2003 tentang Sistim Pendidikan Nasional).
 
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