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American Journal of Educational Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-6126

ISSN (Online): 2327-6150

Editor-in-Chief: Freddie W. Litton

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/EDUCATION

Google-based Impact Factor: 1.27   Citations

Article

Subjective Happiness Assessment among Taif University Medical Students

1Medical Intern, Taif University, School of Medicine, Taif, Saudi Arabia

26th year medical student, Taif University, School of Medicine, Taif, Saudi Arabia

3Psychiatry Resident, Taif University, School of Medicine, Taif, Saudi Arabia

4Psychiatric Registrar, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand

5School of Psychology, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

6Vice Dean of Graduate Studies and Scientific Research, Taif University, School of Medicine, Taif, Saudi Arabia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(1), 111-114
doi: 10.12691/education-4-1-17
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Abdullah A Alshehri, Sami M Althobaiti, Huda D Alsaadi, Abdullah K Alnemari, Hussain Alyami, Mohsen Alyami, Khaled A. Alswat. Subjective Happiness Assessment among Taif University Medical Students. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(1):111-114. doi: 10.12691/education-4-1-17.

Correspondence to: Khaled  A. Alswat, Vice Dean of Graduate Studies and Scientific Research, Taif University, School of Medicine, Taif, Saudi Arabia. Email: kalswat@hotmail.com

Abstract

Happiness is a very important factor in human life, it is due to happiness that a person can perform tasks in a better or worse way, as it can affect performance. It also could be affected by different factors including study load, smoking, marital status, income, exercise, and study habits. Medical students in particular are subject to have many factors that could influence their happiness level. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 605 medical students at Taif University, Taif, Saudi Arabia that was conducted between August and November of 2015. Students filled a questioner that includes demographic data and validated questions to assess the subjective happiness [the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS)]. We classified students into happy and unhappy groups according to the score achieved. Those who achieved score more than median were considered to be happy. The primary goal is to assess the level happiness and it’s relation to the level of the students, gender, income, study habits, and lifestyle habits. According to the SHS, more students were classified as unhappy (54.4%). The 2nd and 3rd year groups were more likely to be happy (p 0.106). Engaged students were more likely to be happy compared to those who were single or married (p 0.323). Happy students tend to have non-significant higher mean GPA. Happy students were more likely to be younger and reports high/middle income compared to the unhappy group (p <0.05). Those who do exercise for at least 30 min were more likely to be happy compared to those who reports sedentary lifestyle (p 0.146). Students study habits didn’t impact the happiness level (p 0.953). According to SHS, more students were considered to be unhappy. The 2nd and 3rd year groups were happier than the other years. Happy students were more likely to be male, younger, engaged, reports high/middle income, higher GPA and exercise more.

Keywords

References

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Article

Improving Pupils’ Conceptual Understanding by a Connected In-school and Out-of-school Science Program: A Multiple Case Study

1Department of Teacher Education and Center of Expertise Healthy Ageing, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Zernikeplein 9, 9747 AS Groningen, The Netherlands

2Department of Developmental Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS Groningen, The Netherlands


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(1), 115-125
doi: 10.12691/education-4-1-18
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
C. H. Geveke, H. W. Steenbeek, J. M. Doornenbal, P. C. L. van Geert. Improving Pupils’ Conceptual Understanding by a Connected In-school and Out-of-school Science Program: A Multiple Case Study. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(1):115-125. doi: 10.12691/education-4-1-18.

Correspondence to: C.  H. Geveke, Department of Teacher Education and Center of Expertise Healthy Ageing, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Zernikeplein 9, 9747 AS Groningen, The Netherlands. Email: c.h.geveke@pl.hanze.nl

Abstract

The number of out-of-school science programs, which refers to science education at outside school environments, is gradually increasing. Although out-of-school programs are generally considered to be important for the development of pupils’ science knowledge and skills, more evidence concerning the learning effect of these programs is needed. In the present study, we explored whether different degrees of implementation of a connected in-school and out-of-school science program affect pupils’ cognitive science skills in relation to teachers’/instructors’ support. We used a multiple case study design with four cases comprising three different degrees of program implementation: optimal, intermediary and marginal. The cases comprised pupils of upper grade elementary school classes, their teachers, and the instructors of the out-of-school activity. The effect of the program was measured by coding pupils’ performance with a scale based on skill theory, and by coding teacher’s/instructor’s support with the Openness Scale. The data was gathered from microgenetic measurements over time, corresponding with an in-depth analysis of the process of change in naturalistic conditions. We found the highest learning effect in the optimal program implementation, which indicates that it is favorable to implement the complete program, and train teachers/instructors to use open teaching focused on conceptual understanding.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Expenditures on Higher Education in Times of Crisis. Analysis of the Behavior of the Family Investment According to Social Class in the European Union

1Sociology and Social Anthropology Department, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(12A), 11-16
doi: 10.12691/education-3-12A-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Alícia Villar, Francesc J. Hernàndez. The Expenditures on Higher Education in Times of Crisis. Analysis of the Behavior of the Family Investment According to Social Class in the European Union. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(12A):11-16. doi: 10.12691/education-3-12A-2.

Correspondence to: Alícia  Villar, Sociology and Social Anthropology Department, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. Email: alicia.villar@uv.es

Abstract

This paper begins with the observation of secondary data on investment and education in the context of the European Union member states and in the period of the years considered part of the economic crisis. The analysis provides evidence of the change in the purchasing power in the countries of the European Union on levels of expenditure in education, both public and private and, more specifically, on the behavior of private expenditure in tertiary education in order to examine if there is an educational class strategy to the economic crisis. This also leads us to point out some considerations on policies in education in terms of social equity.

Keywords

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