American Journal of Rural Development

Current Issue» Volume 2, Number 3 (2014)

Article

Psychological Characteristics and Non-farm Livelihood Options of Rural Youth in Jabalpur District of Madhya Pradesh India

1Department of Extension Education and Rural Management, Jawaharlal Nehru Agricultural University Jabalpur 482004 (MP), India


American Journal of Rural Development. 2014, 2(3), 53-58
DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-2-3-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Victor Chibuzor Umunnakwe. Psychological Characteristics and Non-farm Livelihood Options of Rural Youth in Jabalpur District of Madhya Pradesh India. American Journal of Rural Development. 2014; 2(3):53-58. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-2-3-3.

Correspondence to: Victor  Chibuzor Umunnakwe, Department of Extension Education and Rural Management, Jawaharlal Nehru Agricultural University Jabalpur 482004 (MP), India. Email: chivicumunna@yahoo.com

Abstract

Many rural youth are faced with difficulty of maintaining livelihoods and consequently, poverty remains pervasive among them. The importance of income generating activities to rural livelihood cannot be over-emphasized. The paper examined the involvement of rural youth in non-farm income generating activities and their psychological characteristics as well as the relationship between their psychological characteristics and their involvement in non-farm income generating activities. Multi-stage random sampling was used to collect data from 247 respondents through interview schedule and data was categorized with mean and standard deviation while Pearson Product Moment Correction (PPMC) was used to test relationships. The results revealed that majority of the respondents had medium risk orientation, economic motivation and innovativeness while first degree and business were the aspired educational attainment and occupation by majority respectively. The findings also showed that majority of rural youth were conservative and fatalistic. Petty trading and pottery were the most and least ranked income generating activities participated by the respondents. Achievement motivation (r = 0.455, P < 0.01), risk orientation (r = 0.364, P < 0.01), economic motivation (r = 0.446, P < 0.01) and innovativeness (r = 0.345, P < 0.01) had a significant positive relationships with involvement in non-farm income generating activities whereas educational aspiration (r = -0.222, P < 0.01), occupational aspiration (r = -0.133, P < 0.05), conservatism-liberalism (r = -0.407, P < 0.01) and fatalism-scienticism (r = -0.327, P < 0.01) had significant and negative relationships with involvement in non-farm income generating activities. Governmental and non-governmental organizations should take into consideration all non-farm income generating activities engaged in by rural youth as well as the above psychological variables when initiating and embarking on programmes targeted at improving their livelihoods.

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References

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Article

Effectiveness of Modular Training at Farmers’ Training Center: Evidence from Fogera District, South Gondar Zone, Ethiopia

1Addis Ababa University College of Development Studies Center for Rural Development, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia


American Journal of Rural Development. 2014, 2(3), 46-52
DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-2-3-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Wuletaw Mekuria. Effectiveness of Modular Training at Farmers’ Training Center: Evidence from Fogera District, South Gondar Zone, Ethiopia. American Journal of Rural Development. 2014; 2(3):46-52. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-2-3-2.

Correspondence to: Wuletaw  Mekuria, Addis Ababa University College of Development Studies Center for Rural Development, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Email: wuletaw.m@gmail.com

Abstract

Training helps to enhance human capabilities in improving the level of thinking and ways of life. However, in rural Ethiopia, access to modular training is not well deliberated. This paper is attempted to understand effectiveness of modular training at farmers’ training centre in Fogera district. The aim of the research was identifying the knowledge gap of the farmers, linkages of institutions and positive deviances of training centres. The study was conducted in 2010 from 120 households selected in systematic random sampling. Interview schedule was applied for data collection supplemented with field observation and focused group discussion. Teacher made test, practice test, Likert scale and linkage matrix were employed to examine the effectiveness of modular training. The result revealed that knowledge, skill, attitude and institutional linkage are essential variables which influence effectiveness of modular training significantly. This study has also shown that trained farmers are likely to be positive deviants in beekeeping than untrained farmers. Even though the duration and seasons of training were adequate and convenient, low participation of women and theoretical nature of trainings made the program ineffective. This implies that practical training and integration of actors enable to diversify production potentials. Emphasis should be given for proper functioning of training centres that could be achieved through stability of the program, institutional linkage and knowledge management schemes.

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Article

Assessing the Quality Land Administration System in Pakistan Using Systematic Approach of Case Study Methodology

1Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO), Karachi, Pakistan

2Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation, University of Twente, AE Enschede, the Netherlands


American Journal of Rural Development. 2014, 2(3), 40-45
DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-2-3-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Zahir Ali, Jaap Zevenbergen, Arbind Tuladhar. Assessing the Quality Land Administration System in Pakistan Using Systematic Approach of Case Study Methodology. American Journal of Rural Development. 2014; 2(3):40-45. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-2-3-1.

Correspondence to: Zahir  Ali, Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO), Karachi, Pakistan. Email: drzahirali@hotmail.com

Abstract

Land Information System is a tool for legal, administrative and economic decision making as well as an aid for planning and development. The present land administration system in Pakistan is entirely based on paper land records and maps lacking standards with outdated information stored at different administrative levels. Such practice restricts the usefulness of reliable and quality land information for supporting tenure security to citizens, socio-economic development, and urban/rural development including infrastructure. This situation demands for a methodological framework to assess the quality of the existing system before going to take necessary action for quality improvement. There have been a few efforts to standardize the procedures for assessing the quality of land administration systems at international level but there is no internationally accepted or standardized method to assess the quality of a standalone land administration system within a country’s environment. To be able to assess the quality of a standalone land administration system, this paper develops a methodological framework for assessing the quality of the existing land administration system in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan through systematic use of case study methodology including both exploratory and explanatory case study approaches. The main outcomes of this research leads to a standardized framework that can be used for assessing the quality of a standalone land administration system within a country’s environment.

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