American Journal of Rural Development

Current Issue» Volume 2, Number 4 (2014)

Article

Implementing Total Quality Management Concepts to Land Administration System in Pakistan

1Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO), P.O. Box 8402, Karachi 75270, Pakistan

2Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, the Netherlands

3DCO Gilgit


American Journal of Rural Development. 2014, 2(4), 74-80
DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-2-4-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Zahir Ali, A. M. Tuladhar, J. A. Zevenbergen, Muhammad Ajmal Bhatti. Implementing Total Quality Management Concepts to Land Administration System in Pakistan. American Journal of Rural Development. 2014; 2(4):74-80. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-2-4-3.

Correspondence to: Zahir  Ali, Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO), P.O. Box 8402, Karachi 75270, Pakistan. Email: drzahirali@yahoo.com

Abstract

Evaluation and assessment of land administration system has been getting more attention over the last few years. Different assessment approaches have been tried across land administration systems at international level to assess the performance of these systems, but the attention is given to only those parameters which are common to all these systems. In some cases, legal and technical parameters are considered while institutional and organisational parameters got more attention in others. There have been a few efforts to standardise the procedures for assessing the performance of land administration systems at international level but no internationally accepted or standardised method is there to assess the quality of a standalone land administration system. There is a need to develop a framework for assessing the quality of a standalone land administration system in a country taking into account all its components and parameters as per quality requirements. The core objective of this paper is to develop a framework for applying the concepts of total quality management to land administration system. The case of land administration system in Pakistan is presented and discussed in this paper. The quality improvement guidelines are then developed within the broad context of total quality management for improving the quality of land administration system in Pakistan, which was presupposed as deteriorated.

Keywords

References

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[5]  Ali, Zahir, Zevenbergen, Jaap and Tuladhar, Arbind. (2013) Quality assessment of the land administration system in Pakistan. Journal of Spatial Science, Vol. 58 (1), pp. 119-146.
 
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Article

Rural Water Supply and Sustainable Development in Nigeria: A Case Analysis of Akwa Ibom State

1Department of Public Administration, Akwa Ibom State University, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

2Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, Akwa Ibom State University, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria


American Journal of Rural Development. 2014, 2(4), 68-73
DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-2-4-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Enefiok E. Ibok, Ekong E. Daniel. Rural Water Supply and Sustainable Development in Nigeria: A Case Analysis of Akwa Ibom State. American Journal of Rural Development. 2014; 2(4):68-73. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-2-4-2.

Correspondence to: Ekong  E. Daniel, Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, Akwa Ibom State University, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Email: ekongdan@yahoo.com

Abstract

Generally, the level of water supply in Akwa Ibom State is poor. The situation is pathetic in the rural areas where water is either scarce or costly when it is available. Many trek several kilometres every morning and evening in search of water while others depend on polluted water from ponds, stream, rainwater and floods for domestic use, thereby increasing health hazard. After eighteen (18) years of the establishment of the Akwa Ibom State Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Agency (AKRUWATSAN), coupled with the huge Akwa Ibom State Government expenditure on the provision of water in the rural areas of the State, the situation does not seem to improve. What factors are responsible for the disproportionate water situation in the rural areas? This study attempted to identify the factors. The reports of Akwa Ibom State Water Supply and Sanitation Agency (AK-RUWATSAN) 2012 – 2013 were reviewed to determine the number of rural water projects undertaken in the study area during the period of the report. Structured interviews were conducted with a total of 249 randomly selected respondents in 83 purposively selected communities. The study revealed that Akwa Ibom State Government has developed a total of 83 mini-water projects in the same number of rural communities to boast the supply of clean and safe water in 13 Local Government Areas during the study period. The study has discovered lack of maintenance, lack of community participation, lack of coordination and co-operation among the stakeholders, political factor, inefficient monitoring, and poor attitude towards public property to be the factors responsible for the incommensurate rural water situation in the study area. Rain water harvesting with its various advantages among other strategies has been recommended.

Keywords

References

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Article

Engaging the Extreme Poor People with Private Sector for Livelihood Resilience

1NOHA Mundus Scholar at the Uppsala University, Sweden and Post Graduate Fellow, Stephen Zuellig Graduate School of Development Management, Asian Institute of Management, Philippines


American Journal of Rural Development. 2014, 2(4), 59-67
DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-2-4-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M. Mizanur Rahman. Engaging the Extreme Poor People with Private Sector for Livelihood Resilience. American Journal of Rural Development. 2014; 2(4):59-67. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-2-4-1.

Correspondence to: M.  Mizanur Rahman, NOHA Mundus Scholar at the Uppsala University, Sweden and Post Graduate Fellow, Stephen Zuellig Graduate School of Development Management, Asian Institute of Management, Philippines. Email: mithunmds07@gmail.com

Abstract

Bangladesh made significant improvement in reducing poverty since its independence in 1971 however, diverse developmental challenges remain. The role of public, private and non-governmental actors in poverty reduction has been widely recognized in the literature. Numerous private sector initiatives are proliferating within NGOs’ project portfolios as an opportunity for an innovative approach to poverty reduction. Despite this progress, studies have shown that the degree to which households above the poverty remain highly vulnerable and could slide back into poverty when faced with an economic shock such as loss of working opportunity, food price inflation, illness, natural disasters and other crises. Therefore, beyond attention to poverty alleviation, addressing households’ resilience is crucial to make this progress sustainable. Using a case study approach, this study investigates how a private sector intervention undertaken by NGOs effectively helps the extreme poor households build their livelihood resilience. The case study considered in this research is based on the Social and Economic Transformation of the Ultra-poor (SETU) project of CARE Bangladesh regarding its collaboration with Classical Handmade Products-BD (CHP-BD), an export oriented rug-manufacturing company. Under this collaboration in SETU (phase-1), nearly 270 females from extremely poor households (i.e. SETU project beneficiaries) engaged in rug production of CHP-BD who could create resilient livelihoods and moved them from lower productivity housemaid works to higher productivity rug factory working though they had to face income shock due to a sudden closure of the factories for a couple of months. The study analyses the coping strategies adopted by the workers during the closure. It explores the ways in which workers learnt from this event and changed their behaviour in terms of savings, income diversification and strengthening social connections. The author also analyses how this change in behaviour helps them build livelihood resilience towards potential shocks.

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References

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