Currrent Issue: Volume 3, Number 2, 2015


Article

Production of Japanese Rice through Contract Farming System in Wiang Pa Pao District, Chiang Rai Province, Thailand

1Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, Japan


American Journal of Rural Development. 2015, 3(2), 41-51
doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-4
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kanokon Seemanon, Masahiro Yamao, Kenji Hosono. Production of Japanese Rice through Contract Farming System in Wiang Pa Pao District, Chiang Rai Province, Thailand. American Journal of Rural Development. 2015; 3(2):41-51. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-4.

Correspondence to: Kanokon  Seemanon, Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, Japan. Email: skanokon2627@gmail.com

Abstract

Many companies in Thailand have encouraged farmers especially the northern regions to cultivate DOA 1 and DOA 2 Japanese rice varieties (scientific name: Oryza sativa var. Japonica) through contract farming system in which each company may have different model and management approaches. Therefore, this study explored the currently prevailing contract farming of Japanese rice in Thailand especially in Wiang Pa Pao district, Chiang Rai province, to identify the advantageous and disadvantageous points of Japanese rice production, and to examine the important role of each stakeholder in Japanese rice production. The data of this study were collected from two state agencies, two rice millers, six collectors and thirty contract farmers who were selected for in-depth interviews by using questionnaires and interview forms. The contract farming model and management details were different in each rice mill such as signing a contract, purchase price, commission fee, specifications of rice quality, and so on. Lack of financial liquidity and fluctuation of contract price may influence the confidence of Japanese rice growers in the future. Moreover, lack of quality seeds was another obstacle of Japanese rice production in Thailand. The contract farming of Japanese rice involved many parties as follows: rice mill, collector, contract farmer, and state agency namely Chiang Rai Rice Research Center (CRI) while each stakeholder had different significant roles for the example; CRI produced rice seed to distribute to rice mills, and has developed varieties of this rice. Moreover, it established the Japanese rice community center to produce more rice seeds, and has encouraged farmers to raise the standards of production for the competitive domestic and international markets.

Keywords

References

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[9]  Information and Communication Technology Center with Cooperation of the Customs Department, Ministry of Commerce, “Export-import of Japanese rice of Thailand,” [Online]. Available: http://www2.ops3.moc.go.th/ 2014. [Accessed Sep. 15, 2014].
 
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Article

Factors of Rural Development Driver in Southeastern Bangladesh

1Department of Agribusiness and Marketing, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh

2Senior Scientific officer, Agricultural Economics Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Joydebpur, Gazipur

3Department of Spatial Planning and Development, School of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece


American Journal of Rural Development. 2015, 3(2), 34-40
doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-3
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mohammad Ismail Hossain, Mst. EsmatAra Begum, Eleni Papadopoulou. Factors of Rural Development Driver in Southeastern Bangladesh. American Journal of Rural Development. 2015; 3(2):34-40. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-3.

Correspondence to: Mohammad  Ismail Hossain, Department of Agribusiness and Marketing, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. Email: ismailho12@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

The study examines the patterns and driving factors of rural development in the Bandarban district of Bangladesh and identifies leading and lagging communities in terms of rural development indicators. To achieve this objective, twenty nine rural communities were selected randomly and their weighted scores on selected infrastructural facilities were used to ascertain the pattern and driving force of rural development. The relative strength of the driving factors was determined by factor analysis. The results reveal a disparity in the spatial distribution of rural development facilities, with communities close to the district headquarter performing better. Factor analysis revealed that there are 5 underlying factors that account for 82.413% of the total variance which implies that achievement of spatially even rural development will require the adoption of an integrated government approach.

Keywords

References

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Article

Adaptation Strategies after Cyclone in Southwest Coastal Bangladesh – Pro Poor Policy Choices

1Environmental Science Discipline, Khulna University, Khulna, Bangladesh

2Institute of Regional Science (IfR), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany

3Foreign Research Fellow at Political Science Department of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA


American Journal of Rural Development. 2015, 3(2), 24-33
doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-2
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Zakia Sultana, Bishawjit Mallick. Adaptation Strategies after Cyclone in Southwest Coastal Bangladesh – Pro Poor Policy Choices. American Journal of Rural Development. 2015; 3(2):24-33. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-2.

Correspondence to: Bishawjit  Mallick, Institute of Regional Science (IfR), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany. Email: bishawjit_mallick@biari.brown.edu, bishawjit.mallick@kit.edu

Abstract

People live under the constant threats of natural hazards in the coastal areas all over the world. Thus raise the questions: how do they react to the risk of those natural calamities and how do they adapt with the adverse situations that are derived by those calamities. Taking these into considerations, this research explores the ‘atlas of the locally adopted strategies’ to cope with adverse effects of cyclone Aila in southwest coastal Bangladesh. Particularly, this research has explored the community level practices in agriculture, housing, water resources, communication and employment generations. An empirical survey was undertaken with 145 respondents by using semi-structured interviews with selected social groups and their households’ assistants. Besides face-to-face interviews, this survey applied group level qualitative assessment methods i.e. FGD (focus group discussion), Social Domain Analyses, and In-depth Interviews to collect the data. Results show that people have started to cultivate saline tolerant rice and vegetables on raised homesteads. They are using dripping irrigation methods. Rain water harvesting and artificial aquifer tube-well have been introduced for water management. The houses’ mud walls have been replaced by or even newly rebuilt with Goran wood or bamboo sticks to save lives. They have formed groups to save money for the next disaster and taken out loans for small entrepreneurship projects. Due to the crises of fodder, pastureland and freshwater, people have started to rear small animals and birds like sheep, goat and pigeon instead of cow and buffalo. New technology based shrimp farming is another new innovation. Discussions were held on the pros and cons of all of the above strategies that help to design the long-term risk reduction planning at the local level and addresses the ‘not the need-based planning but the acceptance-based strategies’ mantra of development in context of community based disaster management planning. This paper adds values to the climate change adaptation field by addressing the acceptance of modern disaster risk reduction technologies into a traditionally modified approach based on the empirical evidence of coastal livelihood analysis in Bangladesh.

Keywords

References

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Article

Cost Efficiency of Thai National GAP (QGAP) and Mangosteen Farmers’ Understanding in Chanthaburi Province

1Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, Japan


American Journal of Rural Development. 2015, 3(2), 15-23
doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Pongthong Pongvinyoo, Masahiro Yamao, Kenji Hosono. Cost Efficiency of Thai National GAP (QGAP) and Mangosteen Farmers’ Understanding in Chanthaburi Province. American Journal of Rural Development. 2015; 3(2):15-23. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-3-2-1.

Correspondence to: Pongthong  Pongvinyoo, Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, Japan. Email: drkokung01@hotmail.com

Abstract

GAP has been implemented in mangosteen commodity, which is the important export commodity in Thailand since 2003. The direct market for GAP –based mangosteen has not yet developed. Therefore, the farmers could not get a direct benefit from GAP adoption, and they believed that GAP could not give them any visible benefits. The present study seeks to expose the GAP realistic economic incentives from farmers’ GAP experiences in mangosteen commodity. One-hundred and twelve (112) respondents were randomly selected from 1,968 GAP mangosteen-certified farmers in Chanthaburi province which is the biggest mangosteen cultivation area in Thailand. This study reviewed that GAP certified farmers were satisfied with income from their investment more than the ordinary farmers (cost efficiency = 1.74 and 1.27, respectively). However, the production cost per rai was 11,554.7 THB/rai, higher than the ordinary farmers’ cost (7,007.9 THB/rai). The GAP standard itself provides direct incentive through its knowledge and appropriate farming techniques which are classified as non-economic incentives. The proportion of high-quality mangosteen can be increased if the farmers effectively practice GAP on their farms.

Keywords

References

[1]  Agricultural Statistics of Thailand 2013. Bangkok: Office of Agricultural Economics.
 
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[4]  Amekawa Y., “Can a public GAP approach ensure safety and fairness? A comparative study of Q-GAP in Thailand,” J. Peasant Stud., vol. 40, no. February, pp. 189-217, 2013.
 
[5]  Department of Agriculture. 2009. Thai Fruit Strategy 2010 - 2014 (in Thai). Bangkok: Department of Agriculture.
 
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[13]  Yamane, Taro. 1973. Statistics and Introduction Analysis. 3. New York: Harper & Row.
 
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