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American Journal of Public Health Research

ISSN (Print): 2327-669X

ISSN (Online): 2327-6703

Editor-in-Chief: Jing Sun

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/AJPHR

   

Article

Attitudes of Health Care Workers towards Elderly Depression in Kubau, Nigeria

1Jahun General Hospital, Jahun, Jigawa State, Nigeria

2Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria

3Department of Community Medicine, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Kaduna State, Nigeria


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2017, 5(1), 12-14
doi: 10.12691/ajphr-5-1-3
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kashini ANDREW, Chinedu John-Camillus IGBOANUSI, Istifanus Anekoson JOSHUA, Musa YAKUBU. Attitudes of Health Care Workers towards Elderly Depression in Kubau, Nigeria. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2017; 5(1):12-14. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-5-1-3.

Correspondence to: Kashini  ANDREW, Jahun General Hospital, Jahun, Jigawa State, Nigeria. Email: kashiniandrew12@gmail.com

Abstract

Primary health workers have been shown to write off depressed patients and most have the perception that depression cannot be managed. Data on attitudes towards elderly depression and care options at primary health care level especially in Nigeria and rural Africa is lacking. This study assessed the attitudes of primary health care workers towards elderly depression in Kubau, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: It was a cross sectional descriptive study carried out in June 2012, of the total health workers directly involved in patient care in Kubau. Information on the socio-demographics of the respondents, knowledge, attitudes and care options were obtained using a modified Depression Attitude Questionnaire, interviewer - administered. The collected data was cleaned and entered into SPSS version 16 and the results presented as tables and charts with statistical significance set at p < 0.05. Results: Most health workers had a good attitude towards depression and most (70%) thought elderly depressed patients could be managed, 88.3 % were willing to take time to detect and diagnose depressed patients. Conclusion: The study revealed a good attitude towards depression in the elderly among healthcare workers in Kubau, Nigeria.

Keywords

References

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Article

Assessing Patients’ Satisfaction with the Quality of Ophthalmic Services at Saint John Gaza Eye Clinic

1Adult Health Nursing, Fakeeh College for Medical Sciences, Nursing Department, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

2Mental Health Nursing, Fakeeh College for Medical Sciences, Nursing Department, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

3Clinical Nursing Supervisor, Ranteesy Specialized Paediatric Hospital-Gaza-Palestine, Master of Public Health

4Health System Officer, World Health Organization-oPt


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2017, 5(1), 15-22
doi: 10.12691/ajphr-5-1-4
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Murad Alkhalaileh, Abd Al-Hadi Hasan, Naeem S Al-Kariri, Ali H Abu Ibaid. Assessing Patients’ Satisfaction with the Quality of Ophthalmic Services at Saint John Gaza Eye Clinic. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2017; 5(1):15-22. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-5-1-4.

Correspondence to: Murad  Alkhalaileh, Adult Health Nursing, Fakeeh College for Medical Sciences, Nursing Department, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Email: malkhalaileh@fakeeh.care

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to assess the patients' satisfaction with health services provided at Outpatients' ophthalmology clinic Department at Saint John Hospital. Methods: The design of this study is descriptive, analytical. 309 participants were recruited from the Outpatients' eye Department at Saint John Hospital. Results: Five dimensions of patients' satisfaction were considered in this study; namely, access to care, physical environment, patients' expectations, waiting time in addition to information and interaction. The overall patients' level of satisfaction was 63.9%. The patients' expectation dimension reported the highest level of satisfaction (68.1%), while, the waiting time dimension reported the lowest level of satisfaction (58.5%). The study illustrated important differences in satisfaction in relation to patients' socio-demographic characteristics, health status and organizational characteristics. Discussion: The study revealed that, there were statistically significant differences in the overall satisfaction with old patients, females, low educated, patients with low income and patients with chronic diseases are more satisfied than their counterparts. Conclusion: The study recommended that reducing the patients' time in the outpatient clinic, introducing improvement on existing physical environment of the department and improving the way of communication and interaction between health care providers and patients are important factors for improving the patients' level of satisfaction.

Keywords

References

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Article

Research for Health Priorities in the Northern Cape Province: Fostering Research Capacity to Translate the Identified Research Needs into Action

1Northern Cape Department of Health, Kimberley 8301, South Africa


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2017, 5(1), 23-29
doi: 10.12691/ajphr-5-1-5
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Eshetu Bekele Worku. Research for Health Priorities in the Northern Cape Province: Fostering Research Capacity to Translate the Identified Research Needs into Action. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2017; 5(1):23-29. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-5-1-5.

Correspondence to: Eshetu  Bekele Worku, Northern Cape Department of Health, Kimberley 8301, South Africa. Email: eshetu.b.worku@gmail.com

Abstract

Background: Over the past decades active community engagement in health research has gained significant attention in people-centered health systems throughout the world. Yet there is little evidence about how best to enhance active community engagement in setting priorities for health research, particularly from low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study presents the approaches employed to identify health research priorities and the lesson learnt from the Northern Cape Province in South Africa. Methods: A combination of approaches involving the Essential National Health Research (ENHR), and the World Café consultation processes with the support of experts’ ideas used to enhance key stakeholders (n=41) participation towards the identification of health research priorities for the province. A document on the burden of diseases, health systems challenges and population health status indicators was presented and critically reviewed at the workshop. Results: The top ten health research prority areas for the province identified with active community engagement. More than 90% of the prioritised research areas are operational research which are linked to health services delivery challenges including health systems issues, burden of diseases, health program effectiveness, and the social determinants of health. Conclusion: Active community engagement in setting research priorities for health is a necessary first step to improve the delivery of good quality, equitable and accessible healthcare services for all citizens. However, the current limited resource capacities both in terms of funding and human resources for health research is a concern; and may hamper the effective translation of research priorities to actual action.

Keywords

References

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