Welcome to American Journal of Public Health Research

American Journal of Public Health Research is a peer-reviewed, open access journal in the field of public health science.
The aim of the journal is to stimulate debate and dissemination of knowledge in the public health field in order to improve efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency of public health interventions to improve health outcomes of populations.
Published bi-monthly, American Journal of Public Health Research considers submissions in all aspects of public health.

ISSN (Print): 2327-669X

ISSN (Online): 2327-6703

Editor-in-Chief: Jing Sun

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/AJPHR

   

Article

Benign Breast Diseases: Profile at a Teaching Hospital

1Department of Surgery, Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Nepal

2Resident, MDS Endodontics, Universal Medical College, Bhairawa, Nepal

3Medical Officer, Kolkata, India


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015, 3(4A), 83-86
doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4A-18
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
OB Karki, D Kunwar, Abhijit De. Benign Breast Diseases: Profile at a Teaching Hospital. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015; 3(4A):83-86. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4A-18.

Correspondence to: OB  Karki, Department of Surgery, Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Nepal. Email: karkiom10@gmail.com

Abstract

Benign breast diseases are the most common cause of breast problems. About a quarter of women during her lifetime will suffer from a benign breast disorder that requires some form of treatment. The most common symptoms are breast pain, lumpiness or a lump and nipple discharge. Triple assessment that includes clinical examination, imaging like ultrasonography (USG) or mammography and a pathological examination – FNAC or core needle biopsy has a very high accuracy rate in diagnosing, discrete benign breast diseases and this can be used for reassurance. This was a hospital based prospective study to determine the frequency of benign breast diseases and their pattern. Demographic data, investigations and histopathological diagnosis were collected and analyzed from patients who attended presenting to the department of surgery with breast complaints. The clinical diagnoses were compared with final diagnosis. After that they were appropriately managed. There were 160 patients in the cohort. Out of the patients presenting with benign breast diseases female (96%) were predominant. The majority of the patients (67%) were in the age group of 21 years to 40 years. The commonest presentation of benign breast diseases was pain (45%), followed by lump (26%). Fibroadenoma accounted for 46%. This study showed that among the benign breast diseases in females there were preponderance of mastalgia and fibroadenoma followed by fibrocystic diseases.

Keywords

References

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[9]  Sathian B, Sreedharan J, Baboo NS, Sharan K, Abhilash ES, Rajesh E. Relevance of Sample Size Determination in Medical Research. Nepal Journal of Epidemiology 2010; 1 (1): 4-10.
 
[10]  Kumar M, Ray K, Harode S, Wagh DD. The pattern of benign breast disease in rural hospital in India. East Central African J Surg 2010; 15: 59-64.
 
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Article

Ascertaining Cause of Perinatal Deaths in A Tertiary Care Hospital

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal

2Department of Pediatrics, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015, 3(4A), 87-91
doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4A-19
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
J Shrestha, R Shrestha, R Tuladhar, S Basnet. Ascertaining Cause of Perinatal Deaths in A Tertiary Care Hospital. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015; 3(4A):87-91. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4A-19.

Correspondence to: J  Shrestha, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. Email: junu152001@yahoo.com

Abstract

Perinatal mortality rate of Nepal is high indicating poor obstetrics and neonatal care services in the country. Identifying the causes of perinatal deaths would help in identifying the avoidable deaths so that timely interventions can be implemented in future. This study was conducted with the aim of finding out the perinatal mortality rate and its causes at our centre, Manipal Teaching hospital. This is a prospective observational type of study. Perinatal deaths after 28 weeks of gestation and weighing more than 1 kg and neonatal deaths within one week of birth were included. Maternal and neonatal characteristics were studied. Perinatal deaths were classified according to Aberdeen classification of perinatal deaths. Results indicated perinatal mortality rate of 37.6 per 1000 births with more than 60% stillbirths. Mechanical factors during intrapartum period (21.5%) and neonatal factors like prematurity, meconium aspiration and sepsis (22.4%) were major causes of the perinatal mortality. Almost 24% of the perinatal deaths were unexplained and these occurred in macerated stillbirths. Therefore, focus should be on providing quality antenatal care and strict intrapartum surveillance as well as neonatal care to bring down the perinatal deaths. Autopsy should be considered when cause of death is unexplained.

Keywords

References

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[4]  Ministry of Health and Population, Government of Nepal. Nepal Demographic and Health Survey 2011.
 
[5]  Shrestha M, Manandhar DS, Dahal S, Nepal N. Two year audit of perinatal mortality at Kathmandu Medical CollegeTeaching Hospital. Kathmandu Univ Med J 2006; 4: 176-81.
 
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[8]  Sathian B, Sreedharan J, Baboo NS, Sharan K, Abhilash ES, Rajesh E. Relevance of Sample Size Determination in Medical Research. Nepal Journal of Epidemiology 2010; 1 (1): 4-10.
 
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[11]  Allanson ER, Muller M, Pattison RC. Causes of perinatal mortality and associated maternal compilations in a South African province: challenges in predicting poor outcomes. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2015; 15: 37.
 
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[13]  Shrestha M, Manandhar DS, Dhakal S, Nepal N. Two year audit of perinatal mortality at Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital. Kathmandu Univ Med J 2006; 4 (2): 176-81.
 
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Article

Evaluation of the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) Using the Rasch Model

1Health Promotion, Montana State University - Northern, Havre, MT

2Research and Statistical Consultant, Health Demographics, Havre, MT

3Department of Health and Human Performance, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN

4Department of Psychology, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015, 3(4), 136-147
doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4-3
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Peter D. Hart, Minsoo Kang, Norman L. Weatherby, Yun Soo Lee, Tom M. Brinthaupt. Evaluation of the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) Using the Rasch Model. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015; 3(4):136-147. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4-3.

Correspondence to: Peter  D. Hart, Health Promotion, Montana State University - Northern, Havre, MT. Email: peter.hart@msun.edu

Abstract

Introduction. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an outcome variable of growing importance in chronic disease research. Many intervention-type studies seek to show improvements in HRQOL based on treatment effects. As interest grows in using HRQOL as an outcome measure, the need to investigate the measurement properties of HRQOL assessments increases in importance. Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the SF-36 for proper measurement functioning using the Rasch model. Methods. A total of 634 participants completed the SF-36 HRQOL assessment. The Rasch partial credit model was used to analyze the two dominant HRQOL domains (physical and mental) of the assessment Results. Majority of the total criteria used for optimal category functioning were met for the physical health domain and all of the total criteria were met for the mental health domain. Both convergent and construct validity evidence provided substantial confirmation for the use of the Rasch physical and mental health person scores as measures of HRQOL. Conclusion. Results of this study showed that the SF-36 met stringent modern measurement criteria using the Rasch model.

Keywords

References

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