American Journal of Microbiological Research

Current Issue» Volume 2, Number 5 (2014)

Article

Enrichment of Activated Sludge Process in the Treatment of Industrial Waste Water

1Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied & Environmental Microbiology, Enviro Technology Limited, Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2014, 2(5), 131-137
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-2-5-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Maulin P Shah. Enrichment of Activated Sludge Process in the Treatment of Industrial Waste Water. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2014; 2(5):131-137. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-2-5-2.

Correspondence to: Maulin  P Shah, Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied & Environmental Microbiology, Enviro Technology Limited, Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India. Email: shahmp@uniphos.com

Abstract

In this paper, bioaugmentation was applied to upgrade a full-scale activated sludge system (A) into a contact oxidation system (B). Results showed that when chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NHþ4-N) concentration of the industrial wastewater were 320–530 mg/L and 8–25 mg/L, respectively, the bioaugmented process (A) took only 20 days when they were below 80 mg/L and 10 mg/L, respectively. However, the unbioaugmented conventional activated sludge process (B) spent 30 days to reach the similar effluent quality. As the organic loading rate (OLR) increased from 0.6 to 0.9 and finally up to 1.10 kg COD/m3 d, A showed strong resistance to shock loadings and restored after three days compared to the seven days required by B. Based on the results of this paper, it shows that bioaugementation application is feasible and efficient for the process upgrade due to the availability of the bioaugmented specialized consortia.

Keywords

References

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Article

Effect of Varied Culture Conditions on Crude Supernatant (Bacteriocin) Production from Four Lactobacillus Species Isolated from Locally Fermented Maize (Ogi)

1Department of Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria

2Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biological & Physical Sciences, Abia State University Uturu, Abia State, Nigeria

3Department of Product Development Programme, National Root Crop Research Institute Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2014, 2(5), 125-130
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-2-5-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
C.E Onwuakor, V.O Nwaugo, C.J Nnadi, J.M Emetole. Effect of Varied Culture Conditions on Crude Supernatant (Bacteriocin) Production from Four Lactobacillus Species Isolated from Locally Fermented Maize (Ogi). American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2014; 2(5):125-130. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-2-5-1.

Correspondence to: C.E  Onwuakor, Department of Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria. Email: chijiokeonwuakor@gmail.com

Abstract

This Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) predominates the micro flora of fermented products. They produce metabolites that inhibit the growth of food borne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. The isolation and identification of LAB from fermented maize (Ogi) and the effect of varied culture conditions on crude supernatant production and activity was evaluated. Four (4) isolates of bacteriocin producing lactobacillus species (L. lactis, L. fermentum, L. casei and L. plantarum) with antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC 14028) and Shigella dysenteriae (ATCC 23351) were subjected to varying growth medium conditions. The crude supernatant production was tested at different physical and cultural conditions such as temperature (25, 30, 35 and 40°C), pH (5, 6, 7 and 8), sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration (2, 4, 6 and 8%) and incubation duration (12, 24, 48 and 72 hours). The optimum bacteriocin production judged by their different zones of inhibition of crude supernatant was recorded at temperature, 30°C and then 35°C. There were significant differences between all the incubation temperatures at P<0.05. Duration of incubation showed highest crude supernatant activity after 72 hours. Furthermore, optimal conditions for crude supernatant production were observed to be highest at pH 6.0 followed by 5.0 and then 2% NaCl concentration. There were significant differences between the zones of inhibition of crude supernatants produced against the indicator organisms at various media pH and salt concentrations at P<0.05. These crude supernatants may have a potential use in reducing contaminations during industrial processes, as food preservatives and may help in improving the gastro-intestinal tract by fighting off pathogenic bacteria.

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References

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