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Article

Functionality of Aframomum Danielli Seed Powder Extract in Glycemic Load of Soymilk-Based Juice

1Department of Food Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, West Africa


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(3), 98-102
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-3-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
A.O. Dauda, G.O Adegoke. Functionality of Aframomum Danielli Seed Powder Extract in Glycemic Load of Soymilk-Based Juice. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(3):98-102. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-3-4.

Correspondence to: A.O.  Dauda, Department of Food Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, West Africa. Email: adegboladauda@yahoo.com

Abstract

Spices are important supplements added to food as flavouring agents and/or a preservative and have been in use all over the world for thousands of years. Various additives have been utilised over the years to spice our food products. Synthetic additives, which have been in use, have come with various side effects, hence the need to shift focus to the use of natural ones. Research into the production and utilization of indigenous food additives on a large scale has not been undertaken in Nigeria. Even its utilization in food products to prevent or reduce food related ailments or diseases have not really been done. This present work investigates the health benefits of the spice’s extract on the glycemic load (GL) of the juice to consumers. Standard method was used for extraction of juice from carrot, watermelon and pawpaw. Standard method was equally used for the proximate composition (moisture content, protein, fat, carbohydrate, crude fibre and ash), while soymilk was made from soybeans under laboratory condition. The juices from the vegetable (carrot), fruits (watermelon and pawpaw), and soymilk were blended in equal ratios and thereafter treated with A. danielli extract (1g-3g). Glycemic load (GL) of the samples was determined by multiplying the weighted average of the glycemic indexes (GIs) of the mixed meal by the available carbohydrate and dividing the product by 100. Available carbohydrate was determined by subtracting the fibre content from the total carbohydrate. GL of untreated samples was 10.26, while treated samples recorded low values (6.11-7.20). Standard values were 1-10, low GL; 10.1-20, medium GL; above 20.1 and above, high GL. The outcome of the work could assist in utilising local spices for the full benefit of consumers.

Keywords

References

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Article

Adoption of Improved Bread Wheat Varieties on Small-Scale Farmers: The Case of Boji Gebisa Ambo District, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia

1Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, Ambo University, Ethiopia


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(3), 103-108
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-3-5
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mideksa Bekele, Tadele Shiberu. Adoption of Improved Bread Wheat Varieties on Small-Scale Farmers: The Case of Boji Gebisa Ambo District, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(3):103-108. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-3-5.

Correspondence to: Tadele  Shiberu, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, Ambo University, Ethiopia. Email: tshiberu@yahoo.com

Abstract

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most crop grown in the highlands of and thi region is regarded as the second largest wheat production in sub-Saharan Africa and its contribution to the human diet put it Cleary in the first rank of plants that feed the world. This study was conducted in boji Gebisa, Ambo District, West Shoa, Ethiopia. The study was indicated to assess the adoption of improved bread wheat varieties for small scale farmers, to know the rate of adoption and to identify the major constraints associated with adoption of improved bread wheat varieties. The data were collected from both primary and secondary data sources. So that, the primary data was collected from sample respondents through personal interviews, structured questionnaires and personal observations. Also the secondary data sources were used for the published materials, offices document and annual reports. In this study, systematic random sampling techniques was followed to select 40 respondents. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, percentage, graph and tabulation form which employed to analysis and interpret the collected data. The study showed about 67.5% of the respondents were adopters and 32.5% non- adopters. The adoption rate of improved bread wheat varieties were increased from 10% in 2008 to 67.5% in 2013. So, the rate of adoption was increased dramatically since the agricultural extension services were strongly implemented. Millennium and HAR1685 (Kubsa) were the most popular improved bread wheat varieties grown by the most farmers and followed by Digelu, Danda’a and Kakeba, respectively. The main reason why the non-adopters did not grow improved bread wheat varieties due to financial constraints and high-cost of improved seeds. For the strength of wheat production system, the existences of strong farmers-extension-research linkage among actors within the system has a vital importance in a way that to transfer skill, knowledge and provision of improved bread wheat varieties in efficient and effective manner is mandatory.

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References

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Article

Quality Evaluation of Composite Bread Produced from Wheat, Maize and Orange Fleshed Sweet Potato Flours

1Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Uyo, Uyo Nigeria

2Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Agriculture, Makurdi Nigeria


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(4), 109-115
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Igbabul Bibiana, Num Grace, Amove Julius. Quality Evaluation of Composite Bread Produced from Wheat, Maize and Orange Fleshed Sweet Potato Flours. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(4):109-115. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-1.

Correspondence to: Igbabul  Bibiana, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Uyo, Uyo Nigeria. Email: bibideke@yahoo.com

Abstract

The research was carried out to evaluate the effect of addition of yellow maize (YM) and orange fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) flours on the quality of wheat bread. Maize and sweet potato were processed into flour and mixed with wheat flour for bread production. Five samples of bread were produced and denoted as Samples A to E. Sample A was the control with 100% wheat flour, while Sample B to E had maize and sweet potato flours added in an increasing order of 5 to 20%. The physical properties of the bread loaves were evaluated and the result decreased significantly with increasing levels of yellow maize and orange fleshed sweet potato flours. The loaf volume varied from 340 to 182 cm3 and the bread specific volume ranged from 1.35 to 0.99 cm3/g. The result of the proximate composition showed that moisture and protein contents decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increase in yellow maize and orange fleshed potato flours varying from 34.97 to 29.97% and 13.12 to 7.67% respectively. The fat, crude fibre, ash and carbohydrate contents of the bread samples generally increased significantly (p<0.05) with increase in maize and orange fleshed potato flours. The result of the mineral content revealed that β-carotene and calcium increased significantly with increased levels of maize and sweet potato. The values of magnesium iron and phosphorus in the bread samples had no definite trend. The result of the sensory properties showed that there was significant difference in the texture and taste of 100% wheat bread and the other samples. The 100% wheat bread recorded the highest scores in all the parameters evaluated however all the other samples were well accepted. There was a decrease in the values of overall acceptability, appearance and flavor of the bread samples with increasing levels of maize and sweet potato flours but the decrease was not significantly different.

Keywords

References

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Article

Preservation of Some Physico-Chemical Properties of Soymilk-Based Juice with Aframomum Danielli Spice Powder

1Department of Food Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, West Africa


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(4), 116-121
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
A.O Dauda, G.O. Adegoke. Preservation of Some Physico-Chemical Properties of Soymilk-Based Juice with Aframomum Danielli Spice Powder. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(4):116-121. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-2.

Correspondence to: A.O  Dauda, Department of Food Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, West Africa. Email: adegboladauda@yahoo.com

Abstract

The effect of Aframomum danielli powder on the shelf life of physico-chemical properties of soy-milk based juice was studied. In this paper, attempt was made to investigate the preservative effect of the powder of Aframomum danielli, a local spice, on the physico-chemical properties of blends of soymilk and juices from fruits and vegetable by prolonging its shelf life. This was done by adding 0.5-3.0grams of the spice powder to every 200ml of the blend, while the control samples had no spice. The juice quality was analyzed for sensory attributes and physico-chemical parameters over six month’s period of storage at interval of four weeks. Sensory evaluation of the juices was judged for colour, flavour, taste and general acceptability, on a nine-point hedonic scale, varying from “dislike extremely” (score 1) to “like extremely” (score 9), according to the method of . Ten (10) untrained panel members carried out the sensory evaluation. Infrared spectrophotometer was used to identify functional groups in the powder of the spice, Aframomum danielli, responsible for the stability of the juice. Differences were observed in the colour and aroma of treated samples in comparison with the control, though the samples were generally accepted. The percentage losses recorded for the total soluble solids, ascorbic acids and total sugars of treated samples were far lesser than those of control over the same condition and period of storage. Some of the active components of the spice identified are 4-amino-acetophenone, N,N-dimethyl-2-chloroacetoacetamide, 3-beta-acetoxy-5-etienic acid, 6,10-dimethylundeca-5,9,-diene2-one, Phenyl-3-buten and 4-Phenyl butanone. The samples treated with the Aframomum danielli powder were better preserved than the untreated ones (control).

Keywords

References

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Article

Bioactive Components of Leafy Vegetable Edible Amaranth (Amaranthus mangostanus L.) as Affected by Home Cooking Manners

1Food Science and Technology Program, Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College, Zhuhai, Guangdong, China


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(4), 122-127
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sudan Han, Baojun Xu. Bioactive Components of Leafy Vegetable Edible Amaranth (Amaranthus mangostanus L.) as Affected by Home Cooking Manners. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(4):122-127. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-3.

Correspondence to: Baojun  Xu, Food Science and Technology Program, Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College, Zhuhai, Guangdong, China. Email: baojunxu@uic.edu.hk

Abstract

The objective of the current study is to investigate how home cooking, a common way for many societies to prepare vegetables before consumption, affect bioactive components and antioxidant capacities of a commonly consumed leafy vegetable edible amaranth. The amaranth was cooked by simmering, boiling, frying, blanching and steaming. The contents of total phenolics, anthocyanins, L-ascorbic acid, carotenoids, lutein, beta carotene and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of edible amaranth were determined after the cooking by colorimetric assays. Home cooking proved to degrade anthocyanins but increased carotenoids. Steaming increased total phenol content (TPC) about 50% while simmering reduced 31.1% of TPC. Simmering, frying and blanching deduced L-ascorbic acid content by 18.6%, 17.2%, and 14.0%, respectively. Steaming increased L-ascorbic acid by 21.7%. Both lutein and beta-carotene content was reduced by frying but increased by other methods. FRAP values of cooked vegetable were higher than the raw counterpart, which indicated the cooking increased the antioxidant capacities of the edible amaranth.

Keywords

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Article

Effects of Drying on the Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Green Banana (Musa sapientum) Flour and Development of Baked Product

1Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science & Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh

2Assistant professor, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh

3Professor, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh

4Lecturer, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(4), 128-133
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
S.M. Asif-Ul-Alam, Md Zohurul Islam, Md Mozammel Hoque, Kamrunnaher Monalisa. Effects of Drying on the Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Green Banana (Musa sapientum) Flour and Development of Baked Product. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(4):128-133. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-4.

Correspondence to: Md Zohurul Islam, Assistant professor, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh. Email: zohurulislam.engg@gmail.com

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of hot air drying and freeze drying methods on physicochemical and functional properties of green banana (Musa sapientum) flour and incorporated biscuits. Both freeze and hot air dried green banana flour was replaced by wheat flour with different degrees of substitutions including 0, 10, 15, 20% and subjected to proximate analysis and sensory evaluation. The results of this study showed that freeze drying method retained high amount of protein, fat, ash and fiber content in green banana flour than hot air drying method. The moisture content was high in hot air dried banana flour than freeze dried flour. That’s why the water holding capacity of hot air dried banana flour was high. The freeze dried banana flour had the higher foaming capacity (10.48%) as compared with hot air dried banana flour (8.61%). As the concentration of banana flour increased the spread ratio of biscuits decreased. The addition of increasing level of banana flour had higher ash, fiber, carbohydrate, calcium, phosphorus, iron and zinc content while protein and fat content found lower in the biscuits. In sensory analysis, 5% freeze dried biscuits hold the highest score in color, texture and overall acceptability; and 10% hot air dried secured highest score in flavor.

Keywords

References

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Article

Valorization and Storage Stability Assessment of Underutilized Fruit Carambola (Averrhoa carambola) in Bangladesh

1Lecturer, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh

2Assistant professor, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh

3Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science & Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh

4Professor, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(4), 134-138
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-5
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kamrunnaher Monalisa, Md Zohurul Islam, S.M. Asif-Ul-Alam, Md Mozammel Hoque. Valorization and Storage Stability Assessment of Underutilized Fruit Carambola (Averrhoa carambola) in Bangladesh. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(4):134-138. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-4-5.

Correspondence to: Md Zohurul Islam, Assistant professor, Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh. Email: zohurulislam.engg@gmail.com

Abstract

An effort was made to develop value added products from underutilized fruit Carambola (Averrhoa carambola) to assess its prospect in marketability and evaluated the storage stability of quality attributes at 25-34°C, 10°C and 0°C storage temperatures for 6 months. Carambola Jam showed 70.43±0.02% Carbohydrate, 1.14±0.04% Fiber, 0.47±0.01% Ash, 2.45 pH, 68.40±0.02% TSS, 0.015 mg/100 g Vitamin-C, energy 284.87±0.2 Kcal and in Squash 42.04±0.01% Carbohydrate, 0.08±0.01% Fiber, 0.39±0.04% Ash, 2.40±0.14 pH, 40.70±0.03% TSS, 0.012±0.01 mg/100 g Vitamin-C, 170.04±0.08 Kcal energy. Storage studies showed Carambola Jam and Squash can store almost without any change for 3 months. With increasing the time in 6 months of storage TSS and acidity increases, on the other hand moisture content, pH and vitamin-C decreases. Vitamin-C retention is higher at 25-34°C.

Keywords

References

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Article

Heavy Metal Contamination in Green Leafy Vegetables Collected from Selected Market Sites of Piliyandala Area, Colombo District, Sri Lanka

1Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka, Belihuloya, Sri Lanka

2Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Gangodawila, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka

3Department of livestock Production, Faculty of Agriculture, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka, Belihuloya, Sri Lanka


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(5), 139-144
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-5-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Thilini Kananke, Jagath Wansapala, Anil Gunaratne. Heavy Metal Contamination in Green Leafy Vegetables Collected from Selected Market Sites of Piliyandala Area, Colombo District, Sri Lanka. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(5):139-144. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-5-1.

Correspondence to: Thilini  Kananke, Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka, Belihuloya, Sri Lanka. Email: thilini.kananke@yahoo.com

Abstract

The content of nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) in five different types of green leafy vegetables viz., “Kangkung" (Ipomoea aquatica), "Mukunuwenna" (Alternanthera sessilis), "Thampala" (Amaranthus viridis), "Nivithi" (Basella alba) and “Kohila” (Lasia spinosa) collected from four randomly selected urban and sub urban market sites in and around Piliyandala area of Colombo District, Sri Lanka, were measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed significant differences in elemental concentrations among the green leafy vegetables analyzed. The average concentrations of heavy metals detected in green leafy vegetables ranged from 0.71-15.89, 0.07-0.97, 0.18-5.05, 0.18-1.59, 7.05-18.44 mg/kg for Ni, Cd, Cr, Pb and Cu respectively, on dry matter basis. In addition, the mean concentrations of metals in the green leafy vegetables were found in the order of their abundance as Cu>Ni>Cr>Pb>Cd. However, there were no significant differences (p < 0.05) between the heavy metal contents in combined green leafy vegetables collected from the four market sites. It was also found that the Ni, Cd, Cr and Pb levels exceeded the maximum permissible limits set by FAO/WHO for human consumption.

Keywords

References

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Article

Microbiological and Sensory Profile of Soymilk Based Juice Treated with Liquid Extract of A. Danielli

1Department of Food Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, West Africa


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(5), 145-149
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-5-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Dauda A.O, Adegoke G.O.. Microbiological and Sensory Profile of Soymilk Based Juice Treated with Liquid Extract of A. Danielli. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(5):145-149. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-5-2.

Correspondence to: Adegoke  G.O., Department of Food Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, West Africa. Email: adegboladauda@yahoo.com

Abstract

The microbiological and sensory profile soymilk-based juice treated with aqueous extract of Aframomum danielli (1%-3%-w/v) and stored at 27±2C for twenty four weeks were examined. Synthetic additives/preservatives, which have been in use over the years, are more expensive and mostly imported with hard earned scarce foreign exchange. Adequate research work into the production and utilization of indigenous food additives on a large scale has not been undertaken in developing countries. This work was therefore planned to ascertain the usefulness of extracts of A. danielli, a local spice, in stabilizing the microbiological quality of soymilk-based juice. Standard methods were used for the production of juice samples from pineapple, orange, carrot and milk from soybeans. They were blended together in equal proportion and thereafter treated with A. danielli extract (1.0% to 3.0%) and stored at 27+2C for twenty four weeks. Infrared spectrophotometer was used to identify functional groups in Aframomum danielli and hence the active components responsible for the stability of the juice. Standard AOAC method was used for microbiological analysis of treated and untreated samples. Consumer evaluation of juice samples was done using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Some of the active components of the spice identified are 4-amino-acetophenone, N,N-dimethyl-2-chloroacetoacetamide, 3-beta-acetoxy-5-etienic acid, 6,10-dimethylundeca-5,9,-diene2-one, Phenyl-3-buten and 4-Phenyl butanone. There were significant differences in the microbial counts of the treated and untreated samples. Treated samples experienced little or no growth over the period of storage. The results validate previous reports that A. danielli extract has great preservative potentials. There were significant differences (P < 0.5) for colour and overall acceptability of the samples. When A. danielli extract was added to soymilk-based fruit juice, the microbiological and sensory qualities were found to be better preserved than that of the untreated samples.

Keywords

References

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Article

Soaking and Drying Effect on the Functional Properties of Ogi Produce from Some Selected Maize Varieties

1Department of Food Technology Ikorodu Lagos Lagos State Polytechnic


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014, 2(5), 150-157
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-2-5-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Bolaji O.T., Oyewo A.O, Adepoju P.A. Soaking and Drying Effect on the Functional Properties of Ogi Produce from Some Selected Maize Varieties. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2014; 2(5):150-157. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-2-5-3.

Correspondence to: Bolaji  O.T., Department of Food Technology Ikorodu Lagos Lagos State Polytechnic. Email: olusholat@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of soaking period (12, 24 and 36 hours) and drying temperature (40,50 and 60°C) on the functional properties of Ogi powder produced from four different maize varieties; A5W, A4Y, D1Y and S7Y. The moisture content and drying rate decreased significantly (p< 0.05) with increase in time and drying temperature. There were no significant difference (p>0.05) in Bulk Density, Sedimentation and Swelling Power. The result revealed that sedimentation volumes were not influenced by processing methods while starch damage of the Ogi powders varies from 92.03 to 95.02%. This increased with increase in drying temperature. Ogi powders had least gelation of 8% for all the maize varieties. There were significant differences (p<0.05) in Viscosity, Solubility, Water Absorption Capacities (WAC) and Oil Absorption Capacities (OAC). Ogi powder produced from A4Y variety and soaked for 12 hours exhibited higher WAC values at 50°C. This variety also displayed higher values of water absorption capacity at all temperatures. Solubility, viscosity and swelling power increased with increase in temperature. The viscosity of the Ogi powders pastes ranged from 1200-1794 cps, and 804- 1540 at 80 and 30°C, respectively. Ogi powders produced from D1Y and S7Y exhibited higher degree of retrogradation. Differences observed in the functional properties among varieties highlight the possible application of end-product suitability in Ogi powder processing.

Keywords

References

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