American Journal of Food Science and Technology

ISSN (Print): 2333-4827

ISSN (Online): 2333-4835

Editor-in-Chief: Hyo Choi

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/AJFST

   

Article

Effect of Wrapping Materials on Physico-chemical and Microbiological Qualities of Fermented Melon Seed (Citrullus colocynthis L.) Used as Condiment

1Department of Food Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2016, 4(1), 14-19
doi: 10.12691/ajfst-4-1-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Anne I. Peter-Ikechukwu, Ngozi O. Kabuo, Serah O. Alagbaoso, Njideka E. Njoku, Chioma N.Eluchie., Williams O. Momoh. Effect of Wrapping Materials on Physico-chemical and Microbiological Qualities of Fermented Melon Seed (Citrullus colocynthis L.) Used as Condiment. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2016; 4(1):14-19. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-4-1-3.

Correspondence to: Anne  I. Peter-Ikechukwu, Department of Food Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria. Email: alagbaososerah@gmail.com

Abstract

The effect of six different wrapping materials on physico-chemical and microbiological qualities of fermented melon seed (Citrullus colocynthis L) was studied. Melon seeds were sorted, washed, boiled (48 hrs), dehulled and wrapped in blanched plantain leaf, then it was boiled again for 2 hours, drained, cooled and allowed to ferment naturally for 72 hours. The fermented melon seeds were then mashed, wrapped with six different wrapping materials include: fresh, blanched and dried of thaumatococcus danielli leaf, aluminum foil, black polyethylene and transparent polyethylene, placed in a warm environment for 72 hours (maturation period). The products which are known as Ogiri condiment were subjected to microbiological and physico-chemical evaluation. The results of the microbiological evaluation showed that the predominant bacteria involved were Bacillus spp, Enterococcus spp and Corynebacterium spp. While Saccharomyces cerevisae was isolated. The results of the physico-chemical evaluation showed increase in pH from 5.5 to 6.3, Titratable acidity (TTA) increased from 0.2% to 0.49% during fermentation and varied during maturation. Alumininum foil had the highest TTA of 0.43% while transparent polyethylene had the lowest TTA of 0.23%. During fermentation, the amino nitrogen increased from 2% to 5.5%. The amino nitrogen also increased appreciably during maturation. Black polyethylene had the highest amino nitrogen value (21.15%) while aluminum foil had the least value of amino nitrogen (15.65%) at 72 hours.

Keywords

References

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Article

Effect of Frozen Storage on the Chemical Stability, Functional and Sensory Properties of ‘Ogbono’ (Irvingiagarbonensis var. excelsa) and ‘Egusi’ (Citrullus vulgaris schrad) Seed Flours

1Department of Food Science and Technology, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt, Nigeria


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2016, 4(1), 20-24
doi: 10.12691/ajfst-4-1-4
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ohwesiri Monday Akusuand, David Barine Kiin-Kabari. Effect of Frozen Storage on the Chemical Stability, Functional and Sensory Properties of ‘Ogbono’ (Irvingiagarbonensis var. excelsa) and ‘Egusi’ (Citrullus vulgaris schrad) Seed Flours. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2016; 4(1):20-24. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-4-1-4.

Correspondence to: David  Barine Kiin-Kabari, Department of Food Science and Technology, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Email: kabaridavid@yahoo.com

Abstract

‘Ogbono’ (Irvingiagarbonensis var. excelsa) and ‘egusi’ (Citrullusvulgaries Schrad) seed flours were packaged separately in vacuum sealed high density polyethylene bags of 0.7mm thickness and were subjected to frozen storage by storing the packs in a domestic deep freezer for up to four months. Samples were removed at intervals of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 months for analysis. The effects of frozen storage on the shelf-stability factors (moisture, free-fatty acids and peroxide values), selected functional properties of water/oil absorption capacity, foam capacity and viscosity and sensory attributes of the frozen ‘ogbono’ and ‘egusi’ samples were investigated. The result of this investigation shows that there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in storage life (shelf stability factors), selected functional and sensory properties of both “ogbono” and ‘egusi’ seed flours frozen up to three months. However, all the shelf-stability properties, selected functional and sensory properties of both flour samples decreased significantly (p<0.05) after four months of frozen storage. Therefore, frozen storage at -18°C could be used to preserve the storage life, functional and sensory properties of vacuum packaged ‘ogbono’ and ‘egusi’ seed flours up to three months in moisture/gas-impermeable polyethylene packs of 0.7mm thickness without losing its sensory properties.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Effects of Temperature and Milk Fat Content on the Electrical Conductivity of Kefir during the Incubation

1Department of Food Engineering, Agriculture Faculty, Namık Kemal University, 59030, Tekirdağ, Turkey

2Namık Kemal University, Vacational School, 59030, Tekirdağ, Turkey


American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2016, 4(1), 25-28
doi: 10.12691/ajfst-4-1-5
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kaptan Binnur, Kayişoğlu Serap. The Effects of Temperature and Milk Fat Content on the Electrical Conductivity of Kefir during the Incubation. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2016; 4(1):25-28. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-4-1-5.

Correspondence to: Kaptan  Binnur, Department of Food Engineering, Agriculture Faculty, Namık Kemal University, 59030, Tekirdağ, Turkey. Email: bkaptan@nku.edu.tr

Abstract

In this study, the relationships between the electrical conductivity and temperature for different milk fat contents were investigated during the incubation of kefir. For kefir production, three milk samples at different fat contents (0.15, 1.7 and 3.0%) and two incubation temperatures (25 °C and 35 °C) were selected. The inoculum level was 2%. The kefir fermentation time was approximately 10 h and the pH of kefir samples were 4.4 in the last stage. The test results showed that electrical conductivity (EC) increased at both the temperatures. The average EC values of non fat milk kefir were in the range of 4.72 mS/cm – 6.4 mS/cm at 35 °C, and 4.72 mS/cm – 5.71 mS/cm at 25 °C. The average EC values of full fat milk kefir were in the range of 4.84 mS/cm – 6.41 mS/cm at 35 °C, and 4.84 mS/cm – 5.63 at 25 °C. The average EC values of low fat milk kefir were in the range of 4.54 mS/cm – 6.39 mS/cm at 35 °C, and 4.54mS/cm – 5.5 mS/cm at 25 °C. Electrical conductivity of samples showed little improvement at low incubation temperature and fat content. Statistically, there was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in EC among samples.

Keywords

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