ISSN (Print): 2328-7349

ISSN (Online): 2328-7330

You are here

Currrent Issue: Volume 4, Number 1, 2016

Article

Quasi Isothermal Heat Engine for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

1Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, AP 70-186, CP 04510, México D. F. México


American Journal of Energy Research. 2016, 4(1), 16-26
doi: 10.12691/ajer-4-1-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
E. Kussul, T. Baidyk, O. Olvera Tapia. Quasi Isothermal Heat Engine for Concentrating Solar Power Systems. American Journal of Energy Research. 2016; 4(1):16-26. doi: 10.12691/ajer-4-1-3.

Correspondence to: E.  Kussul, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, AP 70-186, CP 04510, México D. F. México. Email: ekussul@unam.mx

Abstract

Recently we developed new type of solar concentrators, which have parabolic dish surface approximated with flat facet mirrors. To create the solar power plant on the base of these concentrators it is necessary to develop efficient heat engine for the temperature difference that can be obtained with new concentrators. For this purpose we propose to create quasi isothermal heat engine based on the Ericsson cycle and designed as rolling piston engine. We present in this paper two types of such engines: one-valve heat engine and valve-less heat engine. The theoretical analysis shows that for high temperature 600 K and low temperature 300 K the thermal efficiency can be obtained 0.46-0.49 for one-valve heat engine and 0.36-0.46 for valve-less heat engines for compression rate 1.2-1.05. To obtain acceptable power-two-weight ratio of the engine it is necessary to maintain the mean pressure of the cycle equal to 100-200 bar as it is made in some Stirling engines.

Keywords

References

[1]  Kussul E., Baidyk T., Lara F., Saniger J., Bruce N., Estrada C., Micro facet solar concentrator, International Journal of Sustainable Energy, 2008, Vol.27, Issue 2, pp.61-71.
 
[2]  Kussul E., Baidyk T., Lara-Rosano F., Jose M. Saniger Blesa, Gabriel Ascanio, Neil Bruce, Method and Device for Mirrors Position Adjustment of a Solar Concentrator, USA Patent N US 8,631,995 B2, Jan.21, 2014.
 
[3]  Kussul E., Baidyk T., Lara-Rosano F., Jose M. Saniger Blesa, Neil Bruce, Concentrador Solar, Mexico, Patente No 309274, 26.04.2013.
 
[4]  Kussul E., Baidyk T., Lara-Rosano F., Jose M. Saniger Blesa, Gabriel Ascanio, Neil Bruce, Método y dispositivo de ajuste de posición de espejos de un concentrador solar, Mexico, Patente No 313963, 30.09.2013.
 
[5]  David G. Teraji, Concentrated Solar Power Hybrid Gas Turbine Demonstration Test Results, ASME 2015 Power Conference, San Diego, California, USA, June 28–July 2, 2015, Paper No. POWER2015-49572, pp. 6.
 
Show More References
[6]  Bancha Kongtragool, Somchai Wongwises, A review of solar-powered Stirling engines and low temperature differential Stirling engines, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 7 (2003) 131-154.
 
[7]  Abdou Touré, Pascal Stouffs Modeling of the Ericsson engine, Energy, Volume 76, 1, November 2014, Pages 445-452.
 
[8]  F. Lontsi, O. Hamandjoda, K. F. Djanna, P. Stouffs and J. Nganhou, Dynamic modeling of a small open Joule cycle reciprocating Ericsson engine: simulation results, Energy Science & Engineering, Vol. 1, Issue 3, pp. 109-117.
 
[9]  A. Fula, P. Stouffs and F.Sierra, In-Cylinder Heat Transfer in an Ericsson Engine Prototype, International Conference on Renewable Energies and Power Quality (ICREPQ’13) Bilbao (Spain), 20th to 22th March, 2013, No.11, March 2013, pp.6.
 
[10]  B. Kongtragool and S. Wongwises, A review of solar-powered Stirling engines and low temperature differential Stirling engines, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 7(2) (2003) 131-154.
 
[11]  B. Kongtragool and S. Wongwises, Performance of lowtemperature differential Stirling engines, Renewable Energy, 32(4) (2007) 547-566.
 
[12]  E. Kussul, O. Makeyev, T. Baidyk, and O. Olvera, Design of Ericsson heat engine with micro channel recuperator, ISRN Renewable Energy, Article ID 613642, (2012), 8 pp.
 
[13]  GÖkhan Aran, Aerothermodynamic analysis and design of a rolling piston engine, Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences of Middle East Technical University for the Degree of Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering, June 2007, pp.124.
 
[14]  Geng Wei, Liu Chun Hui and Wang, Yan Zhen, The performance optimization of rolling piston compressors based on CFD simulation, Proc. of International Compressor Engineering Conference, Purdue, Paper 1621 (2004) http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/icec/1621.
 
[15]  Zhao Li, Li Minxia, Ma Yitai, and Liu Zhongyan, Simulation analysis of a two rolling piston expander replacing a throttling valve in a conventional refrigerant heat pump system, Proc. of International Compressor Engineering Conference, Purdue, July 16-19, 2012, N 1339, pp.1-10.
 
[16]  Ihn-Sung Cho, Jae-Youn Jung, The influence of vane on the lubrication characteristics between the vane and rolling piston of a rotary compressor, Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology, 20(12) (2006) 2242-2249.
 
[17]  Ihn-Sung Cho, Seok-Hyung Oh, and Jae-Youn Jung, The lubrication characteristics between the vane and rolling piston in rotary compressor used for refrigeration and air-conditioning systems, KSME International Journal, 15(5) (2001) 562-568.
 
[18]  S. Bonnet, M. Alaphilippe, and P. Stouffs, Energy, exergy and cost analysis of a micro-cogeneration system based on an Ericsson engine, International Journal of Thermal Sciences, 44(12) (2005) 1161-1168.
 
[19]  L.B. Erbay and H.Yavuz, Analysis of an irreversible Ericsson engine with a realistic regenerator, Applied Energy, 62(3) (1999) 155-167.
 
[20]  Yang Jun, Zhang Long, Zhang Li, and Li Hao Yuan, Development of a two-cylinder rolling piston CO2 expander, Proc. of International Compressor Engineering Conference at Purdue, July 12-15, 2010, Paper 2022, 1-5.
 
[21]  E. Sakurai, and J.F. Hamilton, Measurement of operating conditions of rolling piston type rotary compressors, Proc. of International Compressor Engineering Conference, 1982, Paper 373, pp.60-68.
 
[22]  N. Ishii, M. Yamamura, S. Muramatsu, S. Yamamoto, and M. Sakai, Mechanical efficiency of a variable speed scroll compressor, Proc. of International Compressor Engineering Conference. 1990, Paper 705, pp.192-199.
 
Show Less References

Article

Optical Characterization of TiO2-bound (CuFeMnO4) Absorber Paint for Solar Thermal Applications

1Department of Physics, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 00100-30197, Nairobi, Kenya

2Department of Physics, University of Botswana, Private Bag 0022, Gaborone, Botswana


American Journal of Energy Research. 2016, 4(1), 11-15
doi: 10.12691/ajer-4-1-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
C. O. Ayieko, R. J. Musembi, A. A. Ogacho, B. O. Aduda, B. M. Muthoka, P. K. Jain. Optical Characterization of TiO2-bound (CuFeMnO4) Absorber Paint for Solar Thermal Applications. American Journal of Energy Research. 2016; 4(1):11-15. doi: 10.12691/ajer-4-1-2.

Correspondence to: C.  O. Ayieko, Department of Physics, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 00100-30197, Nairobi, Kenya. Email: opiyoc2006@yahoo.com

Abstract

A composite thin film consisting of TiO2 (binder), uniformly mixed CuFeMnO4 paint (solar absorber) was coated on textured aluminum sheets by dip coating. The film’s elemental analysis was done using energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) and the surface of the film characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Optical properties of the TiO2/CuFeMnO4 composite film were also studied using computerized double beam solid-spec 3700 DUV Shimadzu Spectrophotometer. Reflectance was obtained by spectrophotometric measurements, and thermal emmittance was determined using heat flux- based technique respectively. Reflectance measurement values less than 0.03 in the solar wavelength (290 nm < λ < 2500 nm) and low thermal emmittance less than 0.016 for temperatures between 24°C and 100°C were obtained.

Keywords

References

[1]  Kaluža, L., A. Šurca-Vuk, B. Orel, G. Dražič, P. Pelicon (2001). Structural and IR spectroscopic analysis of sol-gel processed CuFeMnO4/silica films for solar absorbers, J. Sol-Gel Science & Technology, 20, 61-63.
 
[2]  Tai, K.L., H. K. Dong, P.A. Chungmoo(1995). Preparation of new black chrome solar selective coatings. Korean journal of chemical Engineering, 2 (12) 207-212.
 
[3]  Ayieko, C. O., R. J. Musembi, S. M. Waita, B. O. Aduda, P. K. Jain (2012). Structural and optical characterization of nitrogen-doped TiO2 thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass slides, International Journal of Energy Engineering, 2(3), 67-72.
 
[4]  Young S. J., K.H. Kim, H. Wook Choi (2010). Properties of TiO2 films prepared for use in Dye-sensitized solar cells by using solgel method at different catalyst concentrations, Journal of the Korean physical society, 57( 4) 1049-1053.
 
[5]  Saeed, M., J. Lawler, C. McCaffery, J. Kim “Heat Flux-Based Emissivity Measurement” in proceedings of Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF-2005), edited by M. El-Genk, AIP Conference Proceedings 746,Melville, New York, 2005, 32-37.
 
Show More References
[6]  Demiryont, H., and Shannon, K.C. III, “Variable Emittance Electrochromic Devices for Satellite Thermal Control in proceedings of Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF-2007), edited by M. El-Genk, AIP Conference Proceedings 978, American Institute of Physics Press, Melville,2007, New York, 51-58.
 
[7]  Sudipto, P., D. Diso, S. Franza, A. Licciulli, L. Rizzo (2013). Spectrally selective absorber coating from transition metal complex for efficient photo-thermal conversion. Journal of material science, 48, 8268-8276.
 
[8]  Jaworske, D.A., and Skowronski, T.J., “Portable Infrared Reflectometer for Evaluating Emittance,” in proceedings of Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF-2000), edited by M. El-Genk, AIP Conference Proceedings 504, American Institute of Physics Press, New York, 2000, 791-796.
 
Show Less References

Article

Exergoeconomic and Sustainability Analysis of Reheat Gas Turbine Engine

1Power and Propulsion Department, School of Aerospace, Transport and Manufacturing Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UK

2Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University, Al Asimah, P.O. Box 5969 Safat 13060, Khalidiya 72301, Kuwait


American Journal of Energy Research. 2016, 4(1), 1-10
doi: 10.12691/ajer-4-1-1
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Abdulrahman Almutairi, Pericles Pilidis, Nawaf Al-Mutawa. Exergoeconomic and Sustainability Analysis of Reheat Gas Turbine Engine. American Journal of Energy Research. 2016; 4(1):1-10. doi: 10.12691/ajer-4-1-1.

Correspondence to: Abdulrahman  Almutairi, Power and Propulsion Department, School of Aerospace, Transport and Manufacturing Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UK. Email: a.s.almutairi@cranfield.ac.uk

Abstract

Exergoeconomic and sustainability analyses have been performed for a heavy duty industrial reheat gas turbine engine. The proposed system was inspired by a GT26, Alstom advance-class gas turbine with a unique design modification based on the reheat principle using two sequential combustion chambers. The IPSEpro software package was used for validating the process and results tested against the manufacturer’s published data. Energy system performance is usually evaluated through energetic or exergetic criteria. The latter has the advantage of determining energy degradation and quantifying the deficiencies within a system as well as recognizing loss sources and types. The cost-effectiveness of using this gas turbine engine has been evaluated using exergoeconomic approach: the Specific Exergy Costing [SPECO] method. The sustainability of the proposed model was estimated using a generic combustor model, HEPHAESTUS, to appraise the emissions impact. The performance of gas turbine engines has been investigated for different load demand and climatic conditions using two configurations. The first system, Case-I, was a simple gas turbine (SCGT) engine, and the second, Case-II, a reheat gas turbine (RHGT) system. The reheat system boosted power output in RGHT, at the same time, reducing exergetic efficiency because of greater fuel consumption. Operating both systems at low ambient temperature is preferable and full load reduces waste exergy. The production cost on an exergy basis demonstrates that the RHGT has a lower value at 7.58 US$/GJ while the SCGT produces energy at 7.77 US$/GJ. From a sustainability perspective, the SCGT shows lower emission levels and has lower environmental impact than the RHGT.

Keywords

References

[1]  P. Ahmadi, I. Dincer, and M. Rosen, “Exergy, exergoeconomic and environmental analyses and evolutionary algorithm based multi-objective optimization of combined cycle power plants,” Energy, vol. 36, no. 10, pp. 5886-5898, 2011.
 
[2]  G. Tsatsaronis, “Combination of Exergetic and Economic Analysis in Energy-Conversion Processes,” 1985, pp. 151-157.
 
[3]  G. Tsatsaronis and M. Winhold, “Exergoeconomic analysis and evaluation of energy-conversion plants—I. A new general methodology,” Energy, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 69-80, Jan. 1985.
 
[4]  L. Meyer, R. Castillo, J. Buchgeister, and G. Tsatsaronis, “Application of exergoeconomic and exergoenvironmental analysis to an SOFC system with an allothermal biomass gasifier,” Int. J. Thermodyn., vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 177-186, 2009.
 
[5]  L. G. Alves and S. A. Nebra, “Exergoeconomic study of hydrogen production from steam reforming of natural gas,” in ECOS 2005 - Proc. 18th Int. Conf. on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation, and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, 2005, pp. 1123-1130.
 
Show More References
[6]  S. E. Yalçin and T. Derbentl, “Exergoeconomic analysis of boilers,” in ECOS 2006 - Proc. 19th Int. Conf. on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, 2006, pp. 459-463.
 
[7]  L. Wang, Y. Yang, C. Dong, Z. Yang, G. Xu, and L. Wu, “Exergoeconomic Evaluation of a Modern Ultra-Supercritical Power Plant,” Energies, vol. 5, no. 12, pp. 3381-3397, 2012.
 
[8]  M. Ameri, P. Ahmadi, and A. Hamidi, “Energy, exergy and exergoeconomic analysis of a steam power plant: A case study,” Int. J. Energy Res., vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 499-512, Apr. 2009.
 
[9]  O. Altuntas, T. H. Karakoc, and A. Hepbasli, “Exergetic, exergoeconomic and sustainability assessments of piston-prop aircraft engines,” Isi Bilim. Ve Tek. Dergisi/ J. Therm. Sci. Technol., vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 133-143, 2012.
 
[10]  H. Kwak, D. Kim, and J. Jeon, “Exergetic and thermoeconomic analyses of power plants,” Energy, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 343-360, 2003.
 
[11]  Y.-H. Kwon, H.-Y. Kwak, and S.-D. Oh, “Exergoeconomic analysis of gas turbine cogeneration systems,” Exergy, An Int. J., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 31-40, 2001.
 
[12]  A. Bejan, G. Tsatseronis and M. Moran, Thermal design and optimization. John Wiley & Sons, 1996.
 
[13]  O. Turan and H. Aydin, “Exergetic and exergo-economic analyses of an aero-derivative gas turbine engine,” Energy, vol. 74, pp. 638-650, 2014.
 
[14]  R. O. Fagbenle, S. S. Adefila, S. Oyedepo, and M. Odunfa, “Exergy, Exergoeconomic and Exergoenvironomic Analyses of Selected Gas Turbine Power Plants in Nigeria,” pp. 1-13, 2014.
 
[15]  T. Taner, “Optimisation processes of energy efficiency for a drying plant: A case of study for Turkey,” Appl. Therm. Eng., vol. 80, pp. 247-260, 2015.
 
[16]  H. Esen, M. Inalli, M. Esen, and K. Pihtili, “Energy and exergy analysis of a ground-coupled heat pump system with two horizontal ground heat exchangers,” Build. Environ., vol. 42, no. 10, pp. 3606-3615, 2007.
 
[17]  G. Chiummo, A. Di Nardo, G. Langella, and C. Noviello, “Exergoeconomic analysis of absorption systems for turbine air inlet cooling in trigeneration plants,” in ECOS 2005 - Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation, and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, 2005, pp. 471-476.
 
[18]  T. Taner and M. Sivrioglu, “Energy-exergy analysis and optimisation of a model sugar factory in Turkey,” Energy, vol. 93, pp. 641-654, 2015.
 
[19]  M. Rosen and I. Dincer, “On exergy and environmental impact,” Int. J. Energy Res., vol. 21, no. January 1996, pp. 643-654, 1997.
 
[20]  P. Ahmadi, I. Dincer, and M. A. Rosen, “Exergy, exergoeconomic and environmental analyses and evolutionary algorithm based multi-objective optimization of combined cycle power plants,” Energy, vol. 36, no. 10, pp. 5886-5898, 2011.
 
[21]  F. Petrakopoulou, A. Boyano, M. Cabrera, and G. Tsatsaronis, “Exergoeconomic and exergoenvironmental analyses of a combined cycle power plant with chemical looping technology,” Int. J. Greenh. Gas Control, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 475-482, 2011.
 
[22]  M. Moran, H. Schapiro, D. Boettner, M. Bailey, Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics. John Wiley & Sons, 2004.
 
[23]  A. Almutairi, P. Pilidis, and N. Al-Mutawa, “Energetic and Exergetic Analysis of Combined Cycle Power Plant: Part-1 Operation and Performance,” Energies, vol. 8, no. 12, pp. 14118-14135, Dec. 2015.
 
[24]  A. Almutairi, “Gas Turbine Technologies.” UK, 2014.
 
[25]  G. Tsatsaronis, “Thermoeconomic analysis and optimization of energy systems,” Prog. Energy Combust. Sci., vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 227-257, 1993.
 
[26]  M. H. Khoshgoftar Manesh, P. Navid, M. Baghestani, S. Khamis Abadi, M. A. Rosen, A. M. Blanco, and M. Amidpour, “Exergoeconomic and exergoenvironmental evaluation of the coupling of a gas fired steam power plant with a total site utility system,” Energy Convers. Manag., vol. 77, pp. 469-483, 2014.
 
[27]  I. Dincer and M. A. Rosen, Exergy. Elsevier Ltd, 2013.
 
Show Less References