Welcome to American Journal of Cancer Prevention

American Journal of Cancer Prevention is a peer reviewed, open access journal that publishes original, high-quality, peer-reviewed research on cancer prevention. The goal of this journal is to provide a platform for scientists and academicians all over the world to promote, share, and discuss various new issues and developments in different areas of Cancer Prevention.

ISSN (Print): 2328-7322

ISSN (Online): 2328-7314

Editor-in-Chief: Nabil Abdel-Hamid

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/AJCP

   

Article

Association between of BMI and Blood Groups with Breast Cancer Incidence among Women of West Iran: A Case-control Study

1Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

2Students Research Committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

3Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2015, 3(3), 65-67
doi: 10.12691/ajcp-3-3-5
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mehrdad Payandeh, Babak Shazad, Masoud Sadeghi, Nahid Bahari, Edris Sadeghi. Association between of BMI and Blood Groups with Breast Cancer Incidence among Women of West Iran: A Case-control Study. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2015; 3(3):65-67. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-3-3-5.

Correspondence to: Masoud  Sadeghi, Students Research Committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Email: Sadeghi_mbrc@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Breast cancer accounts about one fifth of all female malignancy. This cancer is the leading cause of death in high income countries and second leading cause in low and middle income countries. The aim of study is to evaluate a number of factors in the patients of breast cancer compared to controls in West Iran and correlation of them with breast cancer incidence. Patients and Methods: In 2014, 76 patients with breast cancer and invasive ductal carcinoma (cases) and 81 age and sex matched-controls randomly were interred to our study. We compared blood groups, BMI, age at the first menarche and hypertension in both groups. Results: In case group, the frequency of A+, O+, B+ and AB+ was 40.8%, 28.9%, 14.5% and 9.2%, respectively. Also, the frequency of A-, B-, AB-, O- with each other was 6.5%. In control group, A+, O+, B+ and AB+ was 27.2%, 34.6%, 21% and 8.6%, respectively. The frequency of BMI in two groups was almost similar. Of 76 patients, 13.2% had hypertension and also of 81 controls, 16% had hypertension. The mean age t the first menarche for cases was 13.75 years and for controls was 13.77 years. There was significant correlation between of these variables with breast cancer incidence (P>0.05). Conclusions: Blood groups, BMI, age at the first menarche and hypertension are not singly risk factors for breast cancer incidence, but probably combination of them can increases breast cancer incidence. In our opinion, the link between of breast cancer and listed variables is unexplained.

Keywords

References

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Article

Clinicopathology Figures of Breast Cancer Women with Brain Metastasis and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

1Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

2Breast Diseases Department, Breast Cancer Research Centre, ACECR, Iran

3Students Research Committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

4Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2015, 3(3), 68-71
doi: 10.12691/ajcp-3-3-6
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mehrnoush Aeinfar, Safa Najafi, Mehrdad Payandeh, Masoud Sadeghi, Edris Sadeghi. Clinicopathology Figures of Breast Cancer Women with Brain Metastasis and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2015; 3(3):68-71. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-3-3-6.

Correspondence to: Masoud  Sadeghi, Students Research Committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Email: Sadeghi_mbrc@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Breast cancer (BC) metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) or brain metastases include the clinically distinct situations of multiple brain metastasis (78%), solitary brain metastasis (14%), and leptomeningeal metastasis (8%). The aim of this study is to describe clinicopathologic features of patients with BC brain metastasis and to compare estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Her2 expression in them. Materials and Methods: there were 16 patients with brain metastasis and we entered them to our study. Age, sex, kind of pathology, tumor markers, type of treatment, histological grade, size of tumor, laterality and other metastasizes were checked for the patients. ER and PR positivity was defined as ≥10% positive tumor cells with nuclear staining. HER2 positivity was defined as either HER2 gene amplification by fluorescent in situ hybridization or scored as 3+ by IHC. Results: The mean age at diagnosis for the patients was 42.2 years (±14.4) and range of 27 to 73 years that 100% were female. ER, PR, Her-2 and p53 positive for the patients were 43.7%, 56.3%, 43.7% and 37.5%, respectively. Three patients (18.7%) had grade I, nine patients (56.3%) had grade II and four patients (25%) had grade III. The mean OS was 24.7 months with survival rate of 50%. Lymph node metastasis for 13 patients (81.2%) was positive. Conclusions: The mean age for patients with brain metastatic BC at diagnosis is more between 45 to 52 years and also brain metastasis in BC occurs more in HER-2-overexpressing and TNBC. Size of tumor in BC patients >5 cm is a prognostic factor for brain metastasis.

Keywords

References

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Article

Solitary Plasmacytoma in the Oral cavity: A Case Report

1Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

2Students Research Committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

3Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2015, 3(4), 72-73
doi: 10.12691/ajcp-3-4-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mehrdad Payandeh, Masoud Sadeghi, Edris Sadeghi, Jalil Hamidi. Solitary Plasmacytoma in the Oral cavity: A Case Report. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2015; 3(4):72-73. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-3-4-1.

Correspondence to: Masoud  Sadeghi, Students Research Committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Email: sadeghi_mbrc@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: The plasma cell neoplasms may present in soft tissue as extramedullary plasmacytomas, in bone as a solitary plasmacytoma of bone, or as part of the multifocal disseminated disease multiple myeloma. The aim of study is to report solitary plasmacytoma in the oral cavity in a male patient. Case Report: A 65-year-old male was presented to our Clinic with hypertension, high fever and loss of balance. He had nine months ago one localized lytic lesion in his thoracic vertebrae T5. The clinical reports showed multiple myeloma for him. After that, He received melphalan and thalidomide for two months. The patients referred to Clinic again with a new oral lesion. In his treatment follow-up and biopsy from his new oral lesion, pathologist reported plasmacytoma. He was treated with radiotherapy(5.000 cGy), than received maintenance consisted of thalidomide 50 mg (VAD). He died after three months from treatment with VAD. Conclusion: The SPB is as part of the multifocal disseminated disease MM. Also, radiotherapy (5.000 cGy) and VAD are not optimal treatments for SPB.

Keywords

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