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American Journal of Cancer Prevention

ISSN (Print): 2328-7322

ISSN (Online): 2328-7314

Editor-in-Chief: Nabil Abdel-Hamid

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/AJCP

   

Article

Sexual Behavioral Pattern, Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening Practices among Female Undergraduate Students of Public Universities in Anambra State, Nigeria

1Department of Community Medicine, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Awka, Nigeria

2Department of HIV Care and Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria

3Department of Community Medicine, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University / University Teaching Hospital Awka, Nigeria

4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria

5Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University/University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria

6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University/University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2016, 4(2), 26-32
doi: 10.12691/ajcp-4-2-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Valentine C Ilika, Chinomnso C Nnebue, Ngozi N Ikechebelu, Chito P Anyanwu, Amobi L Ilika, Joseph I Ikechebelu. Sexual Behavioral Pattern, Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening Practices among Female Undergraduate Students of Public Universities in Anambra State, Nigeria. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2016; 4(2):26-32. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-4-2-2.

Correspondence to: Chinomnso  C Nnebue, Department of HIV Care and Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria. Email: nnebnons@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Risky sexual behavior, low level of awareness and poor screening uptake have been linked to the high prevalence of cervical cancer in our environment. Objective: To determine the sexual behavioral pattern, cervical cancer awareness and screening practices among female undergraduate students of public universities in Anambra state, Nigeria. Materials and methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study of 342 female undergraduate students in Anambra state, Nigeria selected using a two stage sampling. Data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire and analysed using statistical package for social sciences version 22.0. Chi-square test was used to identify statistically significant associations between variables. A p value of ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The modal age at menarche, 215 (62.9%) was 13-15 years, while 18 (5.3%) first menstruated at ages below 10 years. Of the 311 (71.6%) that ever had sex, 289 (92.9%) had their coitarche at ages below 24 years, 209 (67.2%) were sexually active while 48 (15.4%) had multiple sex partners. About 310 (90.6%) have heard of cervical cancer, 269 (78.8%) were aware of cervical cancer screening, out of which 108 (40.2%) were aware of cervical cancer screening tests with Pap smear as the most mentioned screening test by 55 (51.0%). There were statistically significant associations between uptake of cervical cancer screening and [ever been pregnant (p=0.005), ever used contraceptives (p=0.001) and perceived need for cervical cancer screening (p=0.000) respectively. Conclusions: This study showed a good level of awareness of cervical cancer but cervical cancer screening practices was inadequate. We recommend educational programs and comprehensive cervical cancer screening strategy.

Keywords

References

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Article

A Case of Second Primary Multiple Myeloma Mimicking Bone Metastases in a Patient with Breast Cancer: An Approach to Osseous Metastases

1Department of Medical Oncology, Yuzuncu Yil University Medical Faculty, Van, Turkey


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2016, 4(2), 33-35
doi: 10.12691/ajcp-4-2-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nurhan Onal Kalkan, Muhammed Aslanboga, Erkan Dogan. A Case of Second Primary Multiple Myeloma Mimicking Bone Metastases in a Patient with Breast Cancer: An Approach to Osseous Metastases. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2016; 4(2):33-35. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-4-2-3.

Correspondence to: Erkan  Dogan, Department of Medical Oncology, Yuzuncu Yil University Medical Faculty, Van, Turkey. Email: drerkandogan1@gmail.com

Abstract

A 62-year-old female patient received adjuvant chemotherapy after a mastectomy due to a locally advanced invasive ductal carcinoma eight years ago. During the follow-up, she complained of extensive backache, so a plain radiography was taken. The radiography showed diffuse lytic lesions located primarily around the vertebrae and sternum. Given that the bone lesions could be related to osseous metastases of the breast cancer, a bone scintigraphy was performed and no positive involvement was observed. Magnetic resonance imaging was subsequently applied and diffuse hypointense areas were found on the vertebrae. The patient had also accompanying bicytopenia (thrombocytopenia and luecocytopenia), albumin/globulin inversion and hyperglobulinemia. As the patient did not have such involvement in regard to her overall body scintigraphy and there were accompanying abnormal biochemical parameters, it was concluded that the patient’s bone lesions were an outcome of a hematological malignity. Bone marrow aspiration and the biopsy result were found to be consistent with multiple myeloma (MM). It was thus confirmed that the lytic lesions were not related to breast cancer but rather MM bone lesions. We are able to conclude, based on the case presented herein, that newly-developing bone lesions on patients with breast cancer must be approached with suspicion, and their other laboratory analyses and imaging diagnostic processes must be evaluated carefully. It is necessary to keep in mind that such a condition might be related to other diseases, however rare the occurrence.

Keywords

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Article

Hepatoprotective Effects Exerted by Propolis against Doxorubicin-induced Rat Liver Toxicity: A Biochemical and Histopathological Study

1Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, KSA

2Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Egypt

3Department of Pathology, Al-Ghad International Medical Sciences Colleges, Al-Madinah, KSA

4Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Egypt

5Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Taibah Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, Saudi Arabia

6Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Taibah College of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, Saudi Arabia

7Department of ear, nose and throat surgery, Taibah Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, Saudi Arabia

8Department of Pediatrics, Sohag Teaching Hospital, Sohag, Egypt

9Division of Pediatric cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Maternity and Children Hospital, King Abdullah Medical City, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

10Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, 6th October University, Cairo, Egypt

11Department of Medical Biochemistry, Sohag Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Egypt


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2016, 4(3), 36-40
doi: 10.12691/ajcp-4-3-1
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nassar Ayoub Abdellatif Omar, Amal Nor Edeen Ahmad Allithy, Hussam Baghdadi, Mohammed Zolaly, Mohamed Abdel-haleem, Manal Mohamed Helmy, Mongi Mohamed Ahmed Ayat, Salah Mohamed El Sayed. Hepatoprotective Effects Exerted by Propolis against Doxorubicin-induced Rat Liver Toxicity: A Biochemical and Histopathological Study. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2016; 4(3):36-40. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-4-3-1.

Correspondence to: Salah  Mohamed El Sayed, Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Taibah Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, Saudi Arabia. Email: salahfazara@yahoo.com

Abstract

Doxorubicin (DOX) is a currently used broad spectrum anticancer agent used to treat many cancer types. DOX belongs to anthracycline group of cytotoxic drugs. Unfortunately, DOX induces many side effects e.g. cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. In this experimental study, we assessed the protective potential of honey bee propolis against DOX-induced side effects. Thirty Sprague Dawley male rats (weighing about 200-220 g) were included in our study and divided into three equal experimental groups: group I (untreated control), group II (DOX-treated rats) that received 25 mg/kg DOX by intraperitoneal (i.p) injection for three consecutive days and group III where animals received both DOX and propolis oral propolis (250 mg/kg for 30 consecutive days). By the end of experimental time, all animals were sacrificed on the 30th day where blood samples and tissue sections were collected for detection of the biochemical and histopathological changes. Our data revealed that propolis evidently resulted in hepatoprotective effects against DOX-induced toxicity in rats liver. It can be concluded that propolis provides partial protection against DOX-induced hepatotoxicity.

Keywords

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