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Article

Assessment of Progress Made in Health Infrastructure and Manpower through NRHM and Their Impact in Reducing IMR in India

1Lecturer in Economics, Govt. College Jaitaran (Raj), India


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 118-127
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-9
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M. R. Singariya. Assessment of Progress Made in Health Infrastructure and Manpower through NRHM and Their Impact in Reducing IMR in India. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):118-127. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-9.

Correspondence to: M.  R. Singariya, Lecturer in Economics, Govt. College Jaitaran (Raj), India. Email: mr.singariya@gmail.com

Abstract

One of the prime objectives of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) is to reduce the Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) in India. Different strategies adopted for child health under NRHM are directed to reduce IMR. Using review of available data sources and published literature, the paper aims to examine the impact of NRHM initiatives like health infrastructure and manpower in reducing IMR. The mission had set specific targets; these include a reduction in the infant mortality rate to 30 per 1000 live births. At the national level, there was a decline in the infant mortality rate from 58 per thousand live births in 2005 to 44 in 2011 (all India) after implementation of NRHM. The IMR in focus states like Bihar fell from 61 to 44, in Madhya Pradesh from 76 to 59, in Rajasthan from 68 to 52 and in Assam from 68 to 55. However, 14 states/UTs have already achieved MDG 4 of IMR. These figures are, however, still dismal even when compared to the target IMR rate of 30 under NRHM. Thus the NRHM has had an impact but a rather limited one.

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References

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Article

Estimating the Poverty Line and Living Conditions of Rural Households: A Case Study

1Technical and Vocational University, Shohada Ahwaz No 2, Ahwaz, Iran

2Department of Accounting, Shadegan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shadegan, Iran

3Department of Accounting, Mahshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mahshahr, Iran


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 112-117
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-8
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Seyed Abdollah Moosavi, Esmaiel Hamid, Sadegh alboali. Estimating the Poverty Line and Living Conditions of Rural Households: A Case Study. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):112-117. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-8.

Correspondence to: Seyed  Abdollah Moosavi, Technical and Vocational University, Shohada Ahwaz No 2, Ahwaz, Iran. Email: hamid13561356@gmail.com

Abstract

Poverty has always been studied in a world of certainty. However, if the aim of studying poverty is not only improving the well-being of households who are currently poor, but also preventing people from becoming poor in the future, a new forward looking perspective must be adopted. For thinking about appropriate forward-looking anti-poverty interventions (i.e. interventions that aim to prevent or reduce future poverty rather than alleviate current poverty), the critical need then is to go beyond a cataloging of who is currently poor and who is not, to an assessment of households’ vulnerability to poverty. In this paper, the cost and income of rural households in Khuzestan province have been reviewed and analyzed. Subjective poverty line in terms of behavioral observation were estimated by estimating linear expenditure system (LES) based utility function Stone - Gray and using household budget data (1991-2003) for rural area in Khuzestan province. The product portfolio that were estimated for the minimum wage (poverty line) including food, clothing, housing and health. According to the estimates, the minimum required expenditure for a rural household in Khuzestan province with average household size 9/6 persons in 1991 to 339,182 Rls, and in 1996 was 21,407,484 Rls that in 2009 was equivalent to 4,415,051 Rls.

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Article

Absorptive Capacity and Future Prospects of Emerging Wine Markets in the Middle East: Especial Focus on Iran Middle Class

1Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran Department of Financial Risk Management, Pars Development Center of Electronic Training Courses, Isfahan, Iran


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 105-111
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-7
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Salar Salahi. Absorptive Capacity and Future Prospects of Emerging Wine Markets in the Middle East: Especial Focus on Iran Middle Class. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):105-111. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-7.

Correspondence to: Salar  Salahi, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran Department of Financial Risk Management, Pars Development Center of Electronic Training Courses, Isfahan, Iran. Email: salarsalahi1@gmail.com

Abstract

Current paper discusses the absorptive capacity of wine consumption markets in the Middle East and it especially focuses on Iran. Despite restricted application of wine in Turkey, Egypt and Lebanon, wine consumption is mainly forbidden in most Middle East countries due to religious and cultural beliefs. Although countries such Iran presently are not wine producing regions, they, however, may offer, absorptive markets for consumption. The purpose of current study is to investigate wine consumer behavior and wine market analysis to achieve an insight in to Middle East markets. Quantitative methodology along with a consumer survey was carried out in the specified locations in Iran. Near 90% of correspondents claimed, despite government bans, they had consumed alcoholic beverages at least once in a life time. Most correspondents agreed with the idea of legalization of wine consumption rather than excessive use of homemade toxic wine.

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Article

Social Responsibility as a Contextual Component of the Enterprise Economic Security

1Management and marketing, Kherson national technical university, Kherson, Ukraine

2Department of Information Technologies, Kharkiv Institute of Banking of the University of Banking of the National Bank of Ukraine, Kharkiv, Ukraine


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 95-104
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-6
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Liliya Korchevska, Ganna Zhosan, Sergii Kavun. Social Responsibility as a Contextual Component of the Enterprise Economic Security. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):95-104. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-6.

Correspondence to: Sergii  Kavun, Department of Information Technologies, Kharkiv Institute of Banking of the University of Banking of the National Bank of Ukraine, Kharkiv, Ukraine. Email: kavserg@gmail.com

Abstract

Economic security of the enterprise from a position of iterative approach is considered, namely its structure, functions, processes, the purposes and features of the microsphere, the macrosphere and the metasphere is investigated in the article. This approach also allowed allocating exogenous, endogenous and contextual components that promoted definition of a place of social responsibility in ensuring of the enterprise economic security. In addition, the concept "social responsibility of the enterprise" is considered in this article. The role of social responsibility of the enterprise in preservation of the vital values of socio-technical system is studied. The analysis of the purposes of realization of strategy is provided in the sphere of corporate and social responsibility depending on a branch orientation of the enterprises.

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References

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Article

An Investigation of Poverty, Income Inequality and Their Shifters at Household Level in Pakistan

1Department of Economics, Government College University Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan

2Department of Economics & Vice Chancellor, Government College University Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan

3Department of Business Administration, Institute of Business Administration (IBA), Sukkur (Sindh), Pakistan


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 90-94
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Romiha Nisar, Sofia Anwar, Zakir Hussain, Waqar Akram. An Investigation of Poverty, Income Inequality and Their Shifters at Household Level in Pakistan. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):90-94. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-5.

Correspondence to: Romiha Nisar, Department of Economics, Government College University Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan. Email: romihanisar@hotmail.com

Abstract

The causes of poverty and inequality are complex and multidimensional, based on diverged social, economic, political and demographic shifters. In a country like Pakistan, people generally are deprived of health, education, clothing, housing and human rights. Therefore, it is the need of hour to determine factors affecting the household poverty and inequality. This study presents the facts and figures associated with the household poverty and inequality level using data set of PSLM 2008-09. On the base of consumption expenditures; 34.6%, 40.2% and 25.2% households were considered as chronic, transient, and non-poor respectively. Poverty line was constructed by converting the 1.25 USD into domestic currency by using the average exchange rate of 2008-09. The Results of the Multinomial logit model revealed that land and Livestock as an asset, male headed households, middle level of education, employment status and woman empowerment significantly reduced the chances of transient poverty. Income distribution is deteriorated in this time period by increasing the gulf between the lower and upper income households.

Keywords

References

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Article

Impact of Trade Liberalization and Corruption on Environmental Degradation in Pakistan

1Department of Economics, Government College University Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan

2Department of Economics, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 84-89
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Fatima Zafar, Sofia Anwar, Dr. Zakir Hussain, Nisar Ahmad. Impact of Trade Liberalization and Corruption on Environmental Degradation in Pakistan. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):84-89. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-4.

Correspondence to: Fatima Zafar, Department of Economics, Government College University Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan. Email: fatimazrehman@gmail.com

Abstract

The present study revealed the impact of trade liberalization and corruption on environmental degradation. Yearly data were used from 1980 to 2011 for estimation. Air and water pollution were used as the environmental indicators. First model confirmed the evidence of the EKC. Trade liberalization and corruption index were used as the explanatory variables. Income per capita, square of income per capita, industrial value added, secondary school enrollment, law and order index and fertilizer use were used as control variables. Augmented Dickey Fuller (ADF) test was applied to check the stationarity level of each variable included in the model. Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) was applied to find empirical results. Some policies were suggested on the base of empirical findings.

Keywords

References

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Article

Quality Assessment Parameters of Self Help Group’s: a Psychometrics Analysis on Stakeholders’ Perception

1Department of Commerce, Lumding College, Lumding, Nagaon, Assam, India

2Department of Commerce, Assam University, Diphu Campus, Assam, India


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 69-83
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sanjay Kanti Das, Amalesh Bhowal. Quality Assessment Parameters of Self Help Group’s: a Psychometrics Analysis on Stakeholders’ Perception. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):69-83. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-3.

Correspondence to: Sanjay Kanti Das, Department of Commerce, Lumding College, Lumding, Nagaon, Assam, India. Email: sanjay19711123@rediffmail.com

Abstract

Micro finance has garnered significant worldwide attention as being a successful tool to meet substantial demand for financial services by low-income. India occupies a significant place and a niche in global micro finance through promotion of the Self Help Groups (SHGs) and the home grown SHG-Bank Linkage Programme model (SBLP). Today, there are several agencies working for SHG promotion in the country. However, quality of the SHGs is the major challenge that the SHG movement is confronted with at this point of time in the country. Sa-Dhan (2003) has been initiated one modest effort and identified a lot of issues set out in the quality assessment of SHGs. The main objective of this paper is to assess the opinion of the direct stakeholders (i.e. Promoters, Donors, Financial Institutions and Group itself) of SHGs regarding the parameters (like design, governance, operational, impact etc.) to be considered while assessing the quality of SHGs. The study is conducted by using multi-stage random sampling method to collect primary data from the selected Development Blocks of Nagaon districts of Assam. It is observed that there exists enough evidence to conclude that there is a no difference among the opinion of the direct stakeholders of SHGs regarding the parameters to be considered while assessing the quality of SHGs. It is also observed that there exists enough evidence to conclude that there are differences among direct stakeholders regarding perception of stakeholders about on whose perspective parameters to be considered for assessing quality of SHG.

Keywords

References

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Article

Oil Price Volatility and its Impact on Economic Growth in Pakistan

1Department of Leadership and Management Sciences, National Defence University Islamabad


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 62-68
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Muhammad Jawad. Oil Price Volatility and its Impact on Economic Growth in Pakistan. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):62-68. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-2.

Correspondence to: Muhammad Jawad, Department of Leadership and Management Sciences, National Defence University Islamabad. Email: dr.mjawad@yahoo.com

Abstract

The main objective of this research is to analyze the impact of oil price volatility on the economic growth of Pakistan. Secondary data from 1973 to 2011 were used to estimate the coefficients. Linear Regression analysis is used to analyze the dependency among the dependant and independent variables. All variable Oil price, Oil supply, oil demand, Gross Domestic production, Public sector investment, private sector investment and Trade balance is stationary at 1st Difference through ADF test. Trade Balance, Private sector investments have a significant effect on Gross domestic production and Public sector investment, Oil price volatility has insignificant impact on Gross domestic production. Government should make a proper plan and procedure according to Pakistan’s economic growth and requirement which would help to maintain the equilibrium of oil demand and supply and decreased the impact of oil price volatility on the economic growth. Meanwhile, the government of Pakistan also focused on its trade balance and also tries to increase private sector investment to increase its economic growth.

Keywords

References

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Article

A Project Management Perspective to the Management of Federal Roads in Nigeria: A Case Study of Minna-Bida Road

1Department of Estate Management and Valuation, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria

2Department of Project Management Technology, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013, 1(4), 54-61
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ayo Olatunji, Ikechukwu A. Diugwu. A Project Management Perspective to the Management of Federal Roads in Nigeria: A Case Study of Minna-Bida Road. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2013; 1(4):54-61. doi: 10.12691/jfe-1-4-1.

Correspondence to: Ikechukwu A. Diugwu, Department of Project Management Technology, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria. Email: i.diugwu@futminna.edu.ng

Abstract

This paper is the report of a study on the improvement of road infrastructure in Nigeria using the Minna-Bida road as a case study. The N1.414 trillion which has been appropriated for the road sector in Nigeria since 1999 is seen as an acknowledgement of the crucial role of road transportation in national development. There are views that inadequate funding has contributed substantially to the deplorable condition of some roads, specifically the Minna-Bida road axis; which is additional to the lack of robust project management strategies capable of sustaining these investments. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Nigeria needs a sustainable framework which would ensure the preservation of her road transportation infrastructure; the attainment of which is affected by the level of funding. This paper highlights the failure of direct conventional tolling and makes a case for Public Private Partnership (PPP), by concessioning, as a means of achieving sustainable preservation of the road transportation infrastructure in Nigeria. The financial viability of both the conventional tolling and the modified shadow-toll concession (STC) models were tested using the Internal Rate of Return (IRR) and Net Present Value (NPV). The result shows that while the STC model is financially viable, the conventional tolling model is not.

Keywords

References

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