Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
ISSN (Print): ISSN Pending ISSN (Online): ISSN Pending Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/faac Editor-in-chief: Prof. Luigi Maxmilian Caligiuri
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Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology. 2017, 3(2), 22-25
DOI: 10.12691/faac-3-2-2
Open AccessArticle

Galactic Clusters Stymied Rotating Space to Produce Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies

Jay D. Rynbrandt1,

1Chevron Research, Richmond, CA, USA

Pub. Date: July 13, 2017

Cite this paper:
Jay D. Rynbrandt. Galactic Clusters Stymied Rotating Space to Produce Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies. Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology. 2017; 3(2):22-25. doi: 10.12691/faac-3-2-2

Abstract

Ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) are unique to galactic clusters. They demonstrate a mechanism (rotating galactic space), which first by its absence and later by its development, simply and completely describes all phases of their formation and development within clusters. Galactic spatial rotation normally enables galactic gravity to hold high–speed stars in stable orbits within their local rotating space (without dark matter). UDGs developed in galactic clusters or other galactic groups where their orbits, through space, stymied early development of galactic spatial rotation, in some galaxies. This stymied rotation prevented its use, by pre-UDGs, to enable gravitational capture of their primordial stars and gases. And these stars and gases subsequently spiraled away, from impacted galaxies, in a whirlwind of high-speed mass. This whirlwind eventually pulled space into fast and broad rotation behind it. And this fast, new rotation not only enabled stable orbits (within local rotating space) for the small fraction of fast remaining stars, but also contributed extra speed to their orbits. These ultra diffuse, fast stars comprise recently discovered, UDGs. And some of the stars and gases, that the UDGs lost, eventually join into rich populations of globular clusters, which surround UDGs.

Keywords:
Ultra-diffuse galaxies space rotating space galaxies dark matter galactic clusters Coma

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References:

[1]  Peter van Dokkum et al. “A high stellar velocity dispersion and ~100 globular clusters for the ultra-diffuse galaxy Dragonfly 44” Astrophysical Journal Letters. September 1, 2016.
 
[2]  Christopher Crockett “Dark Galaxies” Science News Vol. 190 / No.12 pp 18-21. December 10, 2016.
 
[3]  Jay D. Rynbrandt, “Novel descriptions of the big bang, inflation, galactic structure and energetic quasars” Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Vol. 2, No.1, 2016, pp 24-34.
 
[4]  Jay D. Rynbrandt, “Alternate mechanisms of dark matter, galactic filaments and the big crunch” Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Vol. 2, No.1, 2016, pp 35-37.
 
[5]  Jay D. Rynbrandt, “Spiral galaxies support rotating space as “dark matter” mechanism” Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Vol. 3, No.1, 2017, pp 1-3.