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Article

Leadership Influence in Learning

1Faculty of psychology and Education Science, University of Bucharest


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 173-182
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-11
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ibitoye Rachel Adeola. Leadership Influence in Learning. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):173-182. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-11.

Correspondence to: Ibitoye  Rachel Adeola, Faculty of psychology and Education Science, University of Bucharest. Email: udzee001@gmail.com

Abstract

A very good and functional way to measure the value of any learning process is by taking into consideration and also utilizing the impact the process as a whole has had on the learner, his society, his economy, his organization and also the level at which more knowledege can be generated. Nowadays, with the level of exposure that we have through the help of science and technology, learning can be done through many different means. However the different ways through which learning can occur can be summed up into these four circumstances, being Education, Self discovery, Experience and Discussions. As mentioned earlier the disposable availabity of science and technology in our todays world simply goes to emphasis the importance and neccessity for not just Teaching but at the same time Learningto occur. Nonetheless for this two processes to occur in such a way that it would be easily said that a learning process has indeed taken place, there’s a dire need for what we can refer to as Effecting Leadership: A role played by the teacher, and alongside, Willful Learning: A role apparently played by the learner. A leader, as much as he has the abilities and powers to Influence his subordinate positively also with the same magnitude can influence the same subordinate negatively. Nevertheless, before going into how this can happen or what circumstances can bring about such divastating results, it is of optimost importance that I highlight with clarity the meaning of the key words in this paper work, so as to enable us have a good understanding of not only the theme but as well as the major aim of the paper, which is tobring to light and in clear terms too, the types of Leaders that can Influence their learners and their immediate environment in the most positive ways. This can be said to be the most important focus of this Paper.

Keywords

References

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[[2]  Peter G. Northouse Second Edition ( Leadership Theory and Practice) Sage Publication, Inc USA.
 
[[3]  Jerome Bruner. (The Culture of Education) Harvard University Press Cambridge,Massachestts London, England.
 
[[4]  Mission to Learn http://www.missiontolearn.com/2009/05/definition-of-learning/.
 
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[6]  How Leadership Influence Student Learning http://www.cehd.umn.edu/carei/Leadership/ReviewofResearch.pdf
 
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Article

Informal Learning Environment: Summer Outdoor Science Experience

1Department of Sciences, Martin University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 167-172
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-10
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mamta Singh-Corresponding. Informal Learning Environment: Summer Outdoor Science Experience. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):167-172. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-10.

Correspondence to: Mamta  Singh-Corresponding, Department of Sciences, Martin University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Email: mamtasingh1328@gmail.com

Abstract

The Spring Mill State Park field trip was organized though university-community partnership in the summer of 2011 to expose students to outdoor learning environment. Informal Learning in outdoor environment, like all learning, can be categorized into the domains of concept knowledge, how students view themselves as learners, and the skills they require to engage in the activities of scientists. The purpose of this field trip was to give students outdoor science experience, to expose them to science learning environment outside the laboratory setting. Sixty-five, third-fifth grade students along with their parents participated in the field trip and completed the survey response. Results suggested that 49.15% student participants indicated that they have never visited a state park before this field trip. 90% of student participants indicated that the Spring Mill State Park field trip was a great experience for them. 50% student participants indicated that the Nature Center activity was their most favorite activity. 38.3% student participants indicated that they have never seen a space capsule or space suite before this field trip. Furthermore, Pearson's Chi-squared test of independence was conducted to test the hypothesis if the learning attitudes were different between male and female student participants. Free statistical software “R” version 3.0.2 (2013) was used to analyze the data. The results suggested that as the p-value was greater than the .05 significance level, the null hypothesis was not rejected that the male participants’ response to all learning attitude questions was independent of female students.

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References

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Article

The Educational Skills Required for Kindergarten Teachers in Jordan

1Faculty of Educational Sciences, Isra University, Amman, Jordan


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 159-166
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-9
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Zahria Ibrahim Abdul-Haq. The Educational Skills Required for Kindergarten Teachers in Jordan. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):159-166. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-9.

Correspondence to: Zahria  Ibrahim Abdul-Haq, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Isra University, Amman, Jordan. Email: mohd_0@hotmail.com

Abstract

This study aims to investigate the degree of availability of the general basic educational skills in kindergarten teachers in Jordan from the standpoint of the teachers themselves, and to identify the effect of the teachers’ major and the Kindergarten type (public/private) on the availability of these educational skills. The study sample consisted of (185) teachers from (65) Kindergartens in five Jordanian governorates, namely; Amman, Madaba, Karak, Irbid and Salt. The sample included (40) private kindergartens and (25) public kindergartens selected with simple random sampling. A questionnaire of (58) items was developed, divided into two domains; personal and social skills, and educational skills. The results indicated that all the questionnaire items are educational skills required for kindergarten teachers from the standpoint of the teachers themselves, and that there are no statistically significant differences (α ≤ 0,05) due to kindergarten type, whereas there are statistically significant differences (α ≤ 0,05) due to teachers’ major (educational/otherwise) in favor of the educational majors. The study recommends the need to hold training courses for kindergarten teachers in modern methods of dealing with children, in addition to limiting working in kindergartens to graduates of the educational sciences faculties.

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References

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Article

Intercultural Education in Cieszyn Silesia

1Faculty of Ethnology and Education, University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 154-158
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-8
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Alina Szczurek-Boruta. Intercultural Education in Cieszyn Silesia. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):154-158. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-8.

Correspondence to: Alina  Szczurek-Boruta, Faculty of Ethnology and Education, University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland. Email: alina.szczurek-boruta@us.edu.pl

Abstract

The leading idea of the presented study is the assumption that the vision of intercultural education has had and currently is reflected in activities aiming at political, economic and cultural integration in Cieszyn Silesia. The article consists of three parts. In the first, the theoretical construction of the undertaken discussion is presented. The author refers here to theories of various origin: Tadeusz Lewowicki and Jerzy Nikitorowicz’s concept of intercultural education, Piotr Sztompka’s concept of society becoming, Miles Hewstone and Roger Brown’s intergroup contact and intergroup differentiation hypothesis. In the second and third part, the author provides some examples of activities undertaken by individuals, groups, institutions, and associations, which all aim at fulfilling the paradigm of coexistence in Cieszyn Silesia. Due attention is drawn to the way in which transmission and concern for cultural heritage has been combined with the implementation of the strategy of coexistence and integration in work with children, youth and adults. The discussion is narrowed to Cieszyn Silesia, the region frequently treated as particularly interesting due to its cultural specificity (clearly observed uniqueness resulting from the contact of different cultures), religious pluralism, historical experiences, and borderland location.

Keywords

References

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[[1]  The text was published in its broadened form in a quarterly Social pedagogy, 1(47), 9-26, Dec. 2013.
 
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[6]  Szczurek-Boruta A., Edukacja i odkrywanie tożsamości w warunkach wielokulturowości. Szkice pedagogiczne, /Education and Identity Discovering in Multicultural Conditions. Educational Sketches/, “Impuls”, Kraków, 2007.
 
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Article

The Practice of Problem-Based Learning: A Guide to Implementing PBL in the College Classroom

1College of Education, Wilmington University, New Castle, DE, USA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 152-153
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-7
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sandra C. Williamson. The Practice of Problem-Based Learning: A Guide to Implementing PBL in the College Classroom. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):152-153. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-7.

Correspondence to: Sandra  C. Williamson, College of Education, Wilmington University, New Castle, DE, USA. Email: Sandra.C.Williamson@wilmu.ed

Abstract

The Practice of Problem-based Learning: Implementing PBL in the College Classroom is written by professors from three disciplines: humanities, (Libby Miles); social science (C. B. Peters); and life sciences (José A. Amador). The book is a guide for the development and implementation of PBL in courses at the college level. Written in story-like narratives the cross-disciplinary approach makes this a useful book for a variety of professors from multiple disciplines.

Keywords

References

[[1]  Amador, J.A., Miles, L., & Peters, (2007). The practice of problem-based learning: A guide to implementing PBL in the college classroom. Boston: Anker. 140 pp.
 

Article

Meaning and Interpretation in a Context of Semiotics

1Department of Philosophy, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk, Russia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 149-151
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-6
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Victor Novoselov. Meaning and Interpretation in a Context of Semiotics. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):149-151. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-6.

Correspondence to: Victor  Novoselov, Department of Philosophy, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk, Russia. Email: viktor-novoselov@yandex.ru

Abstract

This article is devoted the semiotics analysis of concepts «meaning» and «interpretation». On the basis of the analysis the conclusion becomes, that the sign can display a reality only in the course of human activity. Meaning of a sign is a way of its use and interpretation. From the point of view of the theory of interpretants are checked and described conformity, associated with other sign. Thus, the maintenance analysis becomes the cultural-caused operation which is carried out only with physically checked (perceived) products of culture, i.e. with other signs and their mutual correlations. Process unlimited semiotics shows, how signification, constantly correlating one sign with another or with a number of other signs, depicts culture elements.

Keywords

References

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[6]  Victor Novoselov. The Problem of a Signs and World Objects Parity, International Journal of Economy, Management and Social Sciences, Vol 2 - No 12, 2013. 1002-1007.
 
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Article

Implementation of Inclusive Education in Ghanaian Primary Schools: A Look at Teachers` Attitudes

1Adult Education, Ski, Norway


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 142-148
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-5
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Awal Mohammed Alhassan. Implementation of Inclusive Education in Ghanaian Primary Schools: A Look at Teachers` Attitudes. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):142-148. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-5.

Abstract

Studies have revealed that teachers` attitudes toward students with disabilities are different, and these various differences/reasons are dependent on schools` practices of inclusion. The purpose of this study was to examine teachers` attitudes in implementing Inclusive Education in primary and junior high secondary schools in two districts in Ghana (Bole and New Juaben). Interviews were conducted and two classroom observations were undertaken in selected primary and junior secondary schools. 108 teachers responded to questionnaire measures of attitude and ten were interviewed. 20 students were also interviewed. The data was analysed qualitatively and results tabulated with percentages. Results were discussed with respondents to enhance reliability. Based on the theoretical framework used in the study, the results showed differences of teachers` attitudes depending on the type of students` disabilities and disability severity. Negative attitudes of teachers were associated with large class-sizes and the presence of a student with disability in the classroom. A large scale study is required to identify other possible factors or predictors of attitude. It is recommended by this study that awareness-raising about disability is a good step towards an equal position of students with disabilities in the schools in particular and people with disabilities in the society in general. Changes at policy level and support facilities for special needs students as an explicit concern are needed to achieve this equalization.

Keywords

References

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Article

Can Integrating Media into Science Learning Activities Improve Students’ Learning Outcomes?

1Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology college of Education, Agbor, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 138-141
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Clara Dumebi Moemeke. Can Integrating Media into Science Learning Activities Improve Students’ Learning Outcomes?. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):138-141. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-4.

Correspondence to: Clara  Dumebi Moemeke, Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology college of Education, Agbor, Nigeria. Email: claramoekphd@yahoo.co.uk

Abstract

Improving science teaching as a way of improving of science products from Nigerian schools is a top priority of the present. This is due to the importance attached to the vision 20:2020 policy of the government which is striving to use science learning as a launching pad for growing her economy. However the exigencies of the present economic situation of most countries including Nigeria show strict economic policies that have placed constraints on funding of science education. This has resulted in poor and ill-equipped laboratories, poor manpower and inadequate resources for teaching of science and consequently, poor science products. The attention of science practitioners have therefore turned to other possible ways of improving science teaching and learning in schools. The attributes of videos and other audio visuals in compelling learners to learn have been variously reported. This study thus investigated the effect of these audio visuals in helping science learners improve learning outcome in science. 40 SS2 students in two groups of 22 (experimental) and 18 (control) participated in the study that lasted for seven weeks. A pretest- posttest- control group design was adopted. While the experimental group viewed videos of conduct of experiments and activities before engaging in the same activities, the control group used manuals carefully prepared by the researcher showing experimental procedures. Three instruments: test of attitude towards science, test of manipulative skill and test of achievement in science concepts were administered to both groups. Data collected was subjected to t-test and result showed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in attitude, manipulative skill and achievement except in the overall performance in which the experimental group showed marginal superiority. Study concluded that though there are inherent benefits of the use of audio visuals in science teaching, there is need to apply it in addition to other techniques. It also recommended the enhancement of the videos with direct focusing attributes to improve its effectiveness.

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References

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Article

Improving Skills for School Children

1Rehabilitation Department, Apollonia University, Iasi, Romania

2Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr.T.Popa, Iasi, Romania;Chemistry Department, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Iasi, Romania


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 135-137
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ioan Grosu. Improving Skills for School Children. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):135-137. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-3.

Correspondence to: Ioan  Grosu, Rehabilitation Department, Apollonia University, Iasi, Romania. Email: ioan.grosu@chem.uaic.ro

Abstract

It is suggested that the use of technical enough toys by school children help them to improve their practical skills. One of such toys is Driven Spinning Top as a modified version of the old and much beloved Spinning Top. Preliminary results report just positive effects. Other such toys should be invented, adapted or adopted.

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References

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Article

Crossing the Ethic – Non Ethic Border: A Cognitive Dissonance Theory Approach

1University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Puerto Rico


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 123-134
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Silvia López Paláu, Beatriz Rivera-Cruz. Crossing the Ethic – Non Ethic Border: A Cognitive Dissonance Theory Approach. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):123-134. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-2.

Correspondence to: Silvia  López Paláu, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Puerto Rico. Email: slopez@coqui.net

Abstract

The main purpose of this study is to identify the importance of several variables in the ethical decision making process, propose a model that incorporates the Festinger (1957) Cognitive Dissonance Theory and the Jones (1991) model. With that in mind a measurement instrument was developed using the Personal Ethical Threshold (Comer and Vega, 2008). The results provide valuable data worth considering in the design of business curriculums.

Keywords

References

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Article

Sustainable Development through Research and Higher Education in India

1Uttarakhand Science Education and Research Centre (USERC), Dehradun, India


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(3), 117-122
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-3-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Bhavtosh Sharma. Sustainable Development through Research and Higher Education in India. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(3):117-122. doi: 10.12691/education-2-3-1.

Correspondence to: Bhavtosh  Sharma, Uttarakhand Science Education and Research Centre (USERC), Dehradun, India. Email: bhavtoshchem@gmail.com

Abstract

Sustainable development based research and education is the back bone of a nation. Moreover, sustainable development policies highlight the role of education which has become the need of the day to create the awareness among the students, researchers and teachers as well as in local communities for environment protection. The present paper gives an overview regarding the role of research and higher education in the development of a country in sustainable manner. Attempts have also been made to summarise the status of higher education system in the country and various national and state funding agencies which are working for the R & D programmes in the country.

Keywords

References

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