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Article

The Perceived Effects/Impacts of Auditory Deficiency on the Social and Academic Behavior of Students in Hail, Saudi Arabia

1College of Medicine, University of Hail, Saudi Arabia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 54-65
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-10
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Maha Al-shammari, Asma Ashankyty, Najmah Al-Mowina, Nadia Al-Mutairy, Lulwah Al-shammari, Anfal al-qrnas, Susan Amin. The Perceived Effects/Impacts of Auditory Deficiency on the Social and Academic Behavior of Students in Hail, Saudi Arabia. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):54-65. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-10.

Correspondence to: Susan  Amin, College of Medicine, University of Hail, Saudi Arabia. Email: s.amin@uoh.edu.sa

Abstract

Background: Studies of teachers’ perceptions of students that are deaf and hard of hearing (SDHH) academic status compared with peers in high school mainstream and private classrooms are few, thus little is known of how SDHH fare in these classrooms. Current data on academic progress, especially prospective cross sectional data, are scant especially for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia .Most of the studies that have been written for hearing loss have been based on younger children in the kingdom. The studies on students who are between the ages of 15-18 and who are female are insufficient. We chose to look at both standardized surveys of both students' perceptions and teachers’ perceptions to provide a multidimensional picture of the academic status of the SDHH in this study. In the following sections we: (a) Describe a framework for measuring academic status for students in Saudi Arabia; (b) Review the academic status of SDHH student; (c) Review the factors contributing to SDHH academic status. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out on a hundred boys and girls of ages 15-18 with varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. This was carried out by interviews of the students and teachers, to answer our objectives. Results and Discussion: We were able to get a lot of gender specific information comparing female and male responses in Hail. In comparison with boys, girls on average felt they were treated significantly more differently by their parents (24 versus 10). Both girls and boys significantly on average felt that their academic performance was affected by their hearing loss (26 versus 25). Conclusion: This data has aided our understanding of the role of deafness and how it can impact academic performance in Hail. Integrated education in the future is something that would help the students with their communication and learning. Academic performance in Hail appears to be affected by interplay of a number of factors, pinpointing an exact factor would be of interest to future studies.

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References

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Article

Technical Education as a Vital Tool for Skill Acquisition through Guidance and Counseling for Nation Building

1Metalwork Technology Department, Kwara State College Of Education (Technical), Lafiagi, Nigeria

2Department Of Educational Psychology, Emmanuel Alayande College of Education, Oyo, Oyo State, Nigeria

3Automobile Technology Department, Kwara State College of Education (Technical), Lafiagi, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 50-53
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-9
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Alexander Gbenga Ogundele, Christianah Toyin Feyisetan, Gana Peters Shaaba. Technical Education as a Vital Tool for Skill Acquisition through Guidance and Counseling for Nation Building. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):50-53. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-9.

Correspondence to: Alexander  Gbenga Ogundele, Metalwork Technology Department, Kwara State College Of Education (Technical), Lafiagi, Nigeria. Email: alexnig2003@yahoo.com

Abstract

Guidance and Counseling provides a platform that an individual can use to acquire Skill with the right attitudes which are necessary for entrance and progress into an occupation. When skills are acquired in any occupation, it will provide and improve the standard of living with the insurance against poverty, thereby sustaining national development in terms of skill acquisition. People who do not have the guide to acquire skills and knowledge that are relevant to a particular job cannot take up jobs that are readily available. This paper examines technical education, skill acquisition to nation building, guidance and counseling and its impact on technical education. It also recommends among others that the wide gap between the classroom and the industry should be bridged by skill acquisition policy in every ramification. In fact, the ration of theoretical to practical should be 30:70 because you learn what you see, you remember what you touch.

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References

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Article

Analysis of Grades 7 and 8 Physics Textbooks: A Quantitative Approach

1Debre Markos College of Teacher Education, Debre Markos, Ethiopia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 44-49
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-8
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Zemenu Mihret Zewdie. Analysis of Grades 7 and 8 Physics Textbooks: A Quantitative Approach. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):44-49. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-8.

Correspondence to: Zemenu  Mihret Zewdie, Debre Markos College of Teacher Education, Debre Markos, Ethiopia. Email: zmihret@gmail.com, hidasie2000@gmail.com

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to analyze grade 7 and 8 physics student textbooks for Ethiopian schools. The study was conducted based on the comments collected from the school teachers during physics handbook familiarization workshops. In addition, the Ministry of Education demands that textbooks currently in use as well as those that will be produced in the future will be greatly improved or revised. The main method of the research employed was content analysis. The different categories of grade 7 and 8 physics textbooks such as learning objectives, activities, figures and diagrams, text narratives, unit summaries, and end-of-unit exercises were sampled. Quantitative analysis techniques were employed and index values for students’ involvement were calculated. In addition, open-ended questionnaires were prepared, distributed, and collected from teachers and students to triangulate the data obtained from the six sample aspects of the textbooks. The data obtained from the textbooks were analyzed quantitatively and interpreted based on the index value interpretation guideline adapted from literature. The data obtained from the questionnaires were analyzed qualitatively and used to support the quantitative data. The results revealed that learning objectives were stated in all the units in the textbooks. In addition, the figures, diagrams, other drawings, and points that demand emphasis were put in attractive colors that grasp students for reading. However, the other aspects of the textbooks were found to have limitations. These aspects of the textbooks emphasized on memorization of facts, explanations, principles; the activities had immediate answers in the textbooks; figures and diagrams concentrated mainly for illustrative purpose; review questions and problems demanded simple memory and mere mathematical calculations based on previous learning of formulas; summaries reflected main points in the text narratives and limited to raise new questions and up-to-date scientific researches. Accordingly, conclusions were drawn and recommendations for further improvements and revisions were forwarded.

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References

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Article

Entrepreneurial Career of Students in Agriculture: An Analysis

1Social Science Research and Development Center, Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University, South La Union Campus, Agoo, La Union, Philippines


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 35-43
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-7
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Diego A. Waguey. Entrepreneurial Career of Students in Agriculture: An Analysis. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):35-43. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-7.

Correspondence to: Diego  A. Waguey, Social Science Research and Development Center, Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University, South La Union Campus, Agoo, La Union, Philippines. Email: diegzwaguey@yahoo.com

Abstract

The study analyzed the entrepreneurial career of students in agriculture. The output of the research is deemed important for planning actions or interventions designed to improve or enhance the entrepreneurial potentials of agriculture students that will empower them to create opportunities for agricultural and industrial development. The study made use of 175 students taking up agriculture who were randomly selected as respondents. The study used achievement motivation, work habits and attitudes as indicators of entrepreneurial career index of the students. Results indicated that 52% of the respondents have moderately high to high potential ability to engage, sustain, and succeed as entrepreneurs. Relative to achievement motivation, the respondents have high potential ability to: 1) forego small conveniences or discomfort at present in favor of a much bigger and more satisfying returns in the future; 2) focus their energies on the task to be able to accomplish things; and 3) associate with people who work hard and who are knowledgeable about the things they are interested in. On the other hand, the respondents tendnot to likely use their time productively. In terms of work habits and attitudes, the respondents have the following potentials: 1) ability to take upon themselves responsibilities and tasks rather than depending on others, 2) ability not to allow conditions to determine their attitudes towards work, and 3) ability to make responsive and timely decisions. However, they have the tendency not to believe in their abilities or capacities in comparison with others. Findings further showed that students belonging to disunited families and students with entrepreneurial experiences have better entrepreneurial career index than those belonging to intact families. Students who finished and those who are still taking the subject on entrepreneurship and students who have experiences on entrepreneurship have better work habits and attitudes. Results are significant inputs to entrepreneurship education particularly in the field of agriculture as to which characteristics or traits should be developed or be further enhanced among students and as to who should be encouraged and be advised to engage in entrepreneurship. While students possess qualities at varying degrees, it is an important strategy to make them aware of their strengths and weaknesses and to guide them build traits and characteristics necessary for entrepreneurship.

Keywords

References

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Article

Effects of Spontaneous Collaborative Group Approach and REFLECT on Pupils’ Achievement in HIV/AIDS Education

1Department of Arts and Social Sciences Education, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 29-34
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-6
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Oludola Sarah Sopekan. Effects of Spontaneous Collaborative Group Approach and REFLECT on Pupils’ Achievement in HIV/AIDS Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):29-34. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-6.

Correspondence to: Oludola  Sarah Sopekan, Department of Arts and Social Sciences Education, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria. Email: sopekansarah@yahoo.co.uk

Abstract

Primary School pupils constitute a sub-group of young people world-wide exposed to the risk of HIV infection despite various awareness programmes to combat HIV/AIDS prevalence as stated by Goal six of the millennium development goals (MDGs), about its prevalence. Increase in death rates showed that there was low correlation between pupils’ achievement and HIV/AIDS education. However, there were few studies conducted on HIV/AIDS education in Nigerian primary schools and these studies had failed to suggest specific teaching methods for teachers to use. This study investigated the effects of Spontaneous Collaborative Group Approach and Re-generated Freiran Literacy through Empowering Community Techniques (REFLECTS) on pupils’ achievement in HIV/AIDS education using gender as a moderator variable. The study adopted a pre-test, post-test, control group, quasi experimental design with a sample of 399 primary five and six pupils from nine public primary schools in Ogun State, Nigeria. The result showed a significant main effect of treatment on pupils’ achievement in HIV/AIDS education in which pupils exposed to the REFLECT and Spontaneous Collaborative Group Approach performed significantly better than their counterparts exposed to the conventional teaching method. In addition, gender had no significant main effect on pupils’ achievement in HIV/AIDS education. Based on the findings, it was recommended that primary school teachers teaching the core-subjects in which HIV/AIDS education had been incorporated should use participatory teaching strategies such as REFLECT and Spontaneous Collaborative Group Approach in their classes.

Keywords

References

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Article

Planning Techniques Needed to Improve the Teaching and Learning of Basic Technology in the Junior Secondary Schools in Nigeria

1Department of Vocational Teacher Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 23-28
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-5
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nicholas Ogbonna Onele. Planning Techniques Needed to Improve the Teaching and Learning of Basic Technology in the Junior Secondary Schools in Nigeria. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):23-28. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-5.

Correspondence to: Nicholas  Ogbonna Onele, Department of Vocational Teacher Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. Email: nicelinks@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study on the workshop planning techniques needed to improve the teaching and learning of basic technology in Nigeria adopted a survey research design. A sample of 861 respondents was selected for the study. A structured questionnaire consisting of 25 items was developed and used for data collection. The Pearson- Product Moment Correlation Coefficient was used to determine the internal consistency of the instrument. The data collected were analyzed using Mean statistic in order to answer the research question posed for this study, while Analysis of Variance was used to test the null hypothesis at a 0.05 degree of significance. Based on the data analyzed, it was found from the study that twenty four workshop planning techniques are needed. There was no significant difference in the mean responses of the school administrators, basic technology teachers and the basic technology workshop staff on the planning techniques needed for the teaching and learning of basic technology in Nigeria.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Religious Ethics Impact as Evaluative Element of Culture on the Personality Development of the Future Teacher: The Person Measurement Approach

1Educational and Research Institute of socio-pedagogical and artistic education, Melitopol teaching training university named after Bogdan Khmelnitsky, Melitopol, Ukraine

2Philological department, Melitopol teaching training university named after Bogdan Khmelnitsky, Melitopol, Ukraine


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 18-22
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
L. Moskalyova, S. Gurov, T. Gurova. The Religious Ethics Impact as Evaluative Element of Culture on the Personality Development of the Future Teacher: The Person Measurement Approach. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):18-22. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-4.

Correspondence to: S.  Gurov, Philological department, Melitopol teaching training university named after Bogdan Khmelnitsky, Melitopol, Ukraine. Email: serggurov@mail.ru

Abstract

Personality measuring today becomes popular as it is a civilization marker for modern cultural and educational changes in society. Theoretical and methodological foundations of measuring the personality are laid in the present study as the leading principle of humanitarian studies. Human measuring approach in modern understanding is presented as a product of neoclassical science. There are shown major human systems, which are directly influenced by the religious ethics.

Keywords

References

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Article

College Students’ Perceptions of Relations with Parents and Academic Performance

1Department of Psychology, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina, USA

2Department of Psychology, Francis Marion University, Florence, South Carolina, USA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 13-17
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kerry A. Schwanz, Linda J. Palm, Crystal R. Hill-Chapman, Samuel F. Broughton. College Students’ Perceptions of Relations with Parents and Academic Performance. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):13-17. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-3.

Correspondence to: Kerry  A. Schwanz, Department of Psychology, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina, USA. Email: kaschwan@coastal.edu

Abstract

The relationship between parent relations and college students’ academic performance was examined in two studies using samples of students enrolled in two southeastern liberal arts universities (N = 466). T scores on the Relations with Parents subscale on the college version of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-2 served as the measure of student perception of parent relations and academic performance was measured using official university GPA and probation/suspension data. Results for the first study indicated a significant positive correlation between parent relations scores and GPAs. Additionally a significant negative correlation was found between parent relations scores and probation/suspension status. When gender differences were examined, parent relations scores accounted for more variance in academic performance for women than men. Systematic replication of the study at a nearby liberal arts university produced findings congruent with the initial investigation. Implications for college personnel who work with academically at- risk students are discussed.

Keywords

References

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Article

A Critical Overview of Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews in Applied Linguistics Research

1Centre for Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, University of Salford, Manchester, UK


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 6-12
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Fawzi Al Ghazali. A Critical Overview of Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews in Applied Linguistics Research. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):6-12. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-2.

Correspondence to: Fawzi  Al Ghazali, Centre for Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, University of Salford, Manchester, UK. Email: f.a.m.alghazali@edu.salford.ac.uk

Abstract

This paper explored the processes of carrying out, analysing, and reporting qualitative focus group interviews in research pertaining to applied linguistics and language-related disciplines. Interviews are normally used as retrospective tools to elaborate the responses of informants in quantitative surveys with no role for exploring new aspects of beliefs and attitudes that are not included in a survey. This paper hypothesises that interviews have different natures and they can be used as preliminary research tools for exploring new areas of students’ beliefs and linguistic background and meanwhile can assist in devising questionnaire items for subsequent wider use. This non-positivist perspective reduces the role of the researcher in directing the pathway of intended research and allows the informants the opportunity to be the primary sources that feed the questionnaire with their ideas. The research reported in this paper is a part of a large-scale study which investigates students’ beliefs about autonomy in learning English language. Focus group interviews are applied to understand aspects of autonomy as represented by students, and to feed a questionnaire with ample ideas for devising its items. This movement allows for investigating students’ beliefs from an emic view; that is from the insiders’ themselves. Summarising the key features of implementing focus group interviews, the significance of this paper resides in making the complex process of carrying out focus group interviews accessible to all researchers. Gradually, it shows how the principles and conventions of qualitative research are realised in applied linguistics. At a deeper level, it discusses how ethical and validity measures are maintained and the optimal ways of analysing the given data. This paper proposes that interviews can be used as an independent research tool as they represent different settings and can enhance research with new perspectives which a closed-ended questionnaire may not reveal.

Keywords

References

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Article

Detection of Communicative Behavior Patterns AMONG College Students during Lab Practice

1Universidad NacionalAutónoma de México, Mexico, México


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, 2(1), 1-5
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-1-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Edgardo Ruiz Carrillo. Detection of Communicative Behavior Patterns AMONG College Students during Lab Practice. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(1):1-5. doi: 10.12691/education-2-1-1.

Correspondence to: Edgardo  Ruiz Carrillo, Universidad NacionalAutónoma de México, Mexico, México. Email: edgardoruca@hotmail.com

Abstract

The aim of this work is to detect the existence of communicative interaction patterns from the conversations among Biology students during lab practice. Observational methodology was used by creating a category system as an observation tool, and continuing with a process of re-categorization. A total of six sessions were observed and each one last one hour. It was used a software called SDIS-GSEQfor the inter-sessional sequential analysis. The results highlight that it is important for the students the use of question-answer (IAE) in its different modalities: in probability of occurrence, first are the categories of Persuading and Proposing, the next significant sequential probabilities are: Evaluating, Confirming, and Confusing; followed in sequential occurrence order by: Arguing, Classifying, Correcting, Clarifying, and Suggesting and lasting in sequential inhibitory occurrence are: Creating an opinion, Directing, and Evaluating. These are the particular ways in which students encourage their participation during laboratory practice, opening their minds to their classmates’ feedback, which invites them to revalue their initial questions and answers and encourages new discussion topics and increase learning opportunities.

Keywords

References

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