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Article

The Program of Lecture Course “Concepts of Modern Natural Sciences”

1National research Irkutsk state technical university, Irkutsk, Russia

2Bratsk state university, Bratsk, Russia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 344-349
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-12
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
V. K. Voronov, M. V. Grechneva, L. A. Gerashchenko. The Program of Lecture Course “Concepts of Modern Natural Sciences”. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):344-349. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-12.

Correspondence to: V. K. Voronov, National research Irkutsk state technical university, Irkutsk, Russia. Email: voronov@istu.edu.ru

Abstract

The present paper deals with the author’s program of lecture course "Concept of modern natural sciences". The program is intended for teaching the students of higher educational institutions of humanitarian, economic and art profile. In this line, the course structure, duration of different types of lessons, the main topics of lectures and seminars are discussed.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Effects of Self-efficacy Beliefs and Metacognition on Academic Performance: A Mixed Method Study

1Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kakamega, Kenya


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 334-343
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-11
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Catherine M. Aurah. The Effects of Self-efficacy Beliefs and Metacognition on Academic Performance: A Mixed Method Study. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):334-343. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-11.

Correspondence to: Catherine M. Aurah, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kakamega, Kenya. Email: cataurah@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of Self-efficacy Beliefs and Metacognition on Academic Performance among high school students using a mixed method approach. A total of 2,138 form four (12th grade) students participated in the study. The mixed-method study consisted of a quasi-experimental approach and in-depth interviews. Quantitative data were collected from self efficacy questionnaire (SEQ), biology ability test (BAT), genetics problem solving test (GPST) and metacognitive prompting questionnaire (MPQ). Qualitative data were collected using in-depth interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics (hierarchical linear regression and factorial ANOVA). Qualitative data were coded, categorized and reported thematically. Regression analysis indicated that self-efficacy was a strong predictor of academic performance. ANOVA analysis displayed statistically significant differences in metacognition in form of metacognitive prompts between groups. Gender effects were also noted with female students outperforming male students on the genetics problem solving test. Subsequent qualitative data suggested that highly efficacious students did better on the tests than less efficacious students. The metacognitive prompting experience provides a rich environment for the development of metacognitive strategies that can promote problem solving skills among high school students.

Keywords

References

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Article

School Leadership and Denominational Identity: The Case of Roman Catholic-Founded Schools in Uganda

1College of Education and External Studies, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

2Faculty of Humanities, Uganda Martyrs University, Nkozi, Mpigi, Kampla, Uganda.

3Uganda Martyrs Senior secondary School Namugongo Kampala Uganda


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 327-333
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-10
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Anthony Mugagga Muwagga, Gyaviira Musoke Genza, Rex Ssemulya. School Leadership and Denominational Identity: The Case of Roman Catholic-Founded Schools in Uganda. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):327-333. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-10.

Correspondence to: Anthony Mugagga Muwagga, College of Education and External Studies, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. Email: amugagga@educ.mak.ac.ug

Abstract

This paper tries to answer the question: Do leaders in denominational founded schools practice faith based leadership? It attempts to give an explanation why the different stakeholders allege that school leadership is the prime cause for the diminishing presence of denominational identity in most these schools Uganda. The paper uses the Roman catholic founded schools as a case study. Subsequently, it discusses recommendations for reform, including the supposedly ideal qualities of a good ‘faith’ school leader. It calls for rejuvenation of denominational values in the management of schools founded and owned by the Church.

Keywords

References

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Article

Conception of Quebec Students in Teacher Education Regarding the Construction Modes of Science Knowledge

1Département de didactique, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Canada

2Faculté d'éducation, Université d'Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 319-326
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-9
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Abdeljalil Métioui, Louis Trudel. Conception of Quebec Students in Teacher Education Regarding the Construction Modes of Science Knowledge. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):319-326. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-9.

Correspondence to: Abdeljalil Métioui, Département de didactique, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Canada. Email: metioui.abdeljalil@uqam.ca

Abstract

In the present research, we identified the conceptions of 184 students registered in teacher education for the primary order, in relation to construction modes of scientific notions. To characterize their conceptions, we constructed a questionnaire with numerous choices (QCM) regrouping 16 questions. For every question, the student had to encircle the number which corresponds to its choice (1: In disagreement; 2: I do not know or 3: In agreement) besides pointing out the reasons of his choice. Questions were formulated around 4 topics: (1) the objectives of science and its development limits, (2) the role of measure, experimentation and theory in science, (3) the evolution of science: continuity and breakthrough, and (4) logico-mathematical reasoning in sciences. For example, regarding measure, experimentation and theory, their conceptions oscillate between several opposed tendencies, as realism and empiricism. Also, according to the majority, the development of science is uninterrupted and corresponds to an improvement of theories and of laws developed across different epochs and that theory must follow experience.

Keywords

References

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Article

A Few Proposals for Research-based Teaching Project in Chinese Universities- A Case Study of Dalian Nationalities University

1International Business School, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, China

2Business School, University of Cumbria, Lancaster, U.K


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 313-318
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-8
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Huiping TAN, Raye Ng, Li CAI. A Few Proposals for Research-based Teaching Project in Chinese Universities- A Case Study of Dalian Nationalities University. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):313-318. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-8.

Correspondence to: Li CAI, International Business School, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, China. Email: caili@dlnu.edu.cn

Abstract

This paper describes the design of “Headline News Report on International Business” research-based teaching project of the national bilingual model course “International Business” at Dalian Nationalities University of China and then analyses the implementation and effects of this teaching project. Finally, this paper puts forward some suggestions and reflections of the improvement of the teaching project for bilingual business courses for universities of China.

Keywords

References

[
[[1]  Bie Dunrong, "Research on the Implementation Requirements of Research-based Teaching", China University Teaching, 264 (8). 10-12. 2012.
 
[[2]  Fan Quncheng, Xu Tong, Xi Shengqi, Wang Yuyue, "Practice of Research-based Teaching in the Fundamentals of Materials Science Course", China University Teaching, 264 (8). 61-62. 2012.
 
[[3]  Xu Fengsheng, "The Theoretical Exploration on Research Teaching and its Practice", Higher Education of Sciences, 106 (6). 45-48. 2012.
 
[[4]  Zhang Anfu, "Reform of Teaching Methods and Explore Research Teaching", China University Teaching, 257 (1). 65-67. 2012.
 
[[5]  Tan Huiping, Research-Based Teaching Design for International Business, Dalian University of Technology Press, Dalian, 2011.
 
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[6]  Tan Huiping. Heanline News Report on International Business, , Dalian University of Technology Press, Dalian, 2011.
 
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Article

Competing Dichotomies in Teaching Computer Programming to Beginner-Students

1Department of Technology, Northcote College, Auckland, New Zealand

2Graduate School of Management, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 307-312
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-7
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
David Nandigam, Hanoku Bathula. Competing Dichotomies in Teaching Computer Programming to Beginner-Students. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):307-312. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-7.

Correspondence to: Hanoku Bathula, Graduate School of Management, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Email: hanoku@outlook.com

Abstract

The goal in teaching computer programming is to develop in students the capabilities required of a professional software developer. Beginner programmers suffer from a wide range of difficulties and deficits. Several studies suggest that undertaking computer programming for meeting a real industry application is still a challenge for many students even after studying for a year or two. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the challenges in teaching computer programming to beginner-students and to initiate a dialog in the information and communication technology teaching community on how to teach and assess computer programming courses effectively. We undertake an extensive literature review to identify four major programming dichotomies in teaching computer programming: knowledge versus application, comprehension versus generation, procedural versus object oriented and functional versus imperative. Further, based on our teaching experience, we propose a practical approach to teaching computer programming to beginner-students. The paper discusses the implications to ICT teaching community and how teaching and assessments can be made effective to achieve the goal of making beginner programmer learn not only knowledge but also relevant application skills. We believe that the study would contribute to making ICT teaching more practical and effective in achieving their educational goals.

Keywords

References

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Article

Function of Training Background and Teaching Experience with Particular Reference to Final Examinations

1Lecturer at Department of Psychology, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 300-306
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-6
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Abatihun Alehegn Sewagegn. Function of Training Background and Teaching Experience with Particular Reference to Final Examinations. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):300-306. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-6.

Correspondence to: Abatihun Alehegn Sewagegn, Lecturer at Department of Psychology, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia. Email: abatihunalehegn@gmail.com

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to analyze the assessment practice of Debre Markos University instructors as a function of training background and teaching experience with reference to final examinations. Furthermore, the study aimed at investigating the perception of students about the classroom assessment practices of their instructors and the perception of teachers on their classroom assessment practices. The subjects of the study were 280 students and 51 instructors from the five colleges. In addition to this 65 final exam papers were collected from the respective colleges. The instruments used for the study were document analysis (i.e., exam papers), and questionnaires. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive techniques and were tested through t-test and one-way ANOVA. The result suggested that there was significant difference in including the general information’s of test construction principles, writing good multiple choice and short answer items as a function of training background. It was also observed that significant difference was observed in including the general information’s of test construction principles and writing good short answer items as a function of teaching experience. Significant mean difference was not observed on the perception of instructors on the assessment practices. However, significant difference was observed in the perception of students about the assessment practice of instructors across different colleges. On the basis of the findings, conclusions were drawn.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[
[[1]  Airasian, P.W. (2002). Classroom Assessment (Revised Ed.).New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.
 
[[2]  Alkharusi, H. (2010). Teachers’ assessment practices and Students’ perceptions of the classroom assessment environment. World Journal on Educational Technology, 2, 27-41.
 
[[3]  Angela,T.A. & Cross,P.K.(1993). Classroom Assessment Techniques (2nd Ed.). Sanfrancisco: Jossey Bass.
 
[[4]  Animaw T. (2009). “The Status, Gaps, and challenges of implementing Continuous Assessment: The Case of Second Cycle Primary Schools in Debre Markos Town.” (Unpublished, MA Thesis). Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia.
 
[[5]  Brookhart, S. M. (1997). A theoretical framework for the role of classroom assessment in motivating student effort and achievement. Applied Measurement in Education, 10, 161-180.
 
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[8]  Goubeaud, K. & Yan, W. (2004). Teacher educators' teaching methods, assessments, and grading: A comparison of higher education faculty's instructional practices, The Teacher Educator, 40(1), 1-16.
 
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[11]  Izard, J. (2005). Over view of test construction. Paris: International Institute for Educational Planning.
 
[12]  Javid, M. (2009). Assessment Practices: Students’ and teachers’ Perceptions of Classroom Assessment
 
[13]  Lin, R.L., & Gronlund, E.N. (2005). Measurement and assessment in teaching (8th ed.). India: Baba.
 
[14]  Linn, R. & Miller, M. (2005). Measurement and Assessment in Teaching (9th Ed.). Upper Saddle River NJ: Merrill-Prentice Hall.
 
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Article

The Influence of Singing on 15-year-old Students School Performances in Mathematics, Science and Reading Comprehension

1Conservatory of Music of Bolzano- Bozen, Bolzano, Italy

2Technical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 294-299
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Elita Maule, Matthäus Hilpold. The Influence of Singing on 15-year-old Students School Performances in Mathematics, Science and Reading Comprehension. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):294-299. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-5.

Correspondence to: Elita Maule, Conservatory of Music of Bolzano- Bozen, Bolzano, Italy. Email: elita.maule@alice.it

Abstract

Research suggests that music can act as a catalyst for cognitive skills in other disciplines, and the relation between music and spatial-temporal skills is fascinating. In particular, we are able to confirm, thanks to recent studies, the hypothesis that singing (heard or produced autonomously) improves the learning of language, above all on account of the motivation induced and the better structuring of the discourse within the musical container. However, various questions remain unanswered. Little is known about the precise elements of music education that are positively transferrable to other fields. Moreover, further transversal studies would be necessary to establish the duration of such effects. The study presented here stems precisely from the idea of adding a further step in the understanding of what effect musical and vocal experience, in our case in a family environment, might have on learning as a whole. The study takes into account the results of the survey OECD - PISA 2009 and the answers given by the parents of 2,247,100 fifteen-year-old students about the habit of singing with their children during their early childhood. The results would seem to indicate that the performances of the 15-year-olds in mathematics, science and reading comprehension are positively correlated to the frequency with which they were able to undergo musical-vocal experiences inside the family during their first years of life.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[
[[1]  Maule, E and Azzolin S., Suoni e musiche per i piccoli. Educazione sonora integrata per la scuola dell’infanzia, Erickson, Trento, 2009, 139.
 
[[2]  Levitin, D. J., Fatti di musica. La scienza di un'ossessione umana, Codice Edizioni, Torino, 2008, 167.
 
[[3]  Pinker, S., How the mind works, Norton, New York, 1997.
 
[[4]  Levitin, D. J., Fatti di musica. La scienza di un'ossessione umana. Codice edizioni, Torino, 2008, 168.
 
[[5]  Schön, D., Boyer, M., Moreno, S., Besson, M., Peretz, I. and Kolinsky, R., “Songs as an aid for language acquisition”, Cognition, 106 (2), 2008, 975-983.
 
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[8]  Schön, D., Boyer, M., Moreno, S., Besson, M., Peretz, I. and Kolinsky, R., “Songs as an aid for language acquisition”, in Cognition, 106 (2), 2008, 975-983.
 
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Article

Enhancing Student Learning Through Local and Global Examples in a Statistics Unit

1Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 290-293
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jahar Bhowmik. Enhancing Student Learning Through Local and Global Examples in a Statistics Unit. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):290-293. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-4.

Correspondence to: Jahar Bhowmik, Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia. Email: jbhowmik@swin.edu.au

Abstract

Traditionally, undergraduate students studying social sciences are required to commence with a core unit of quantitative methods. Undergraduate students come from a diverse backgrounds and varied motivations. Teaching statistics to a diverse range of students is challenging. After a review of the existing core statistics unit, changes in the curriculum were effected to address the needs and interests of such a diverse group by broadening the curriculum which includes introduction of local and global examples. These changes of curriculum were designed to improve learning outcomes and student engagement. The paper highlights the value of using accessible and relevant “real life” examples to enhance the learning experience of the wider range of students. Initial results are promising suggesting that curriculum changes have benefited students and improved student satisfaction scores. The use of a range of local and global examples closely aligned to learning activities and assessments have been found to be motivating for students and pilot results demonstrate that students’ satisfaction levels have been improved.

Keywords

References

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Article

Factors Contributing to the Students Academic Performance: A Case Study of Islamia University Sub-Campus

1Lecturer, Department of Commerce, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, RYK Campus, Pakistan

2Lecturer, Department of Educational Training, the Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan

3Research Scholar, Department of Commerce, IUB, RYK Campus, Pakistan


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 283-289
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Shoukat Ali, Zubair Haider, Fahad Munir, Hamid Khan, Awais Ahmed. Factors Contributing to the Students Academic Performance: A Case Study of Islamia University Sub-Campus. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):283-289. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-3.

Correspondence to: Zubair Haider, Lecturer, Department of Educational Training, the Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Email: zubairiub@hotmail.com

Abstract

The present research study was design to investigate the factors affecting academic performance of graduate students of Islamia University of Bahawalpur Rahim Yar Khan Campus. The variables under consideration were the academic performance (student’s grades/marks) as a dependent variable and the gender, age, faculty of study, schooling, father/guardian social economic status, and residential area, medium of schooling; tuition trend, daily study hours and accommodation trend were independent variables. The data were collected from 100 students through separate structured questionnaire from different departments of Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Rahim Yar Khan Campus using the simple random sampling technique. For analysis, linear regression model, correlation analysis, and descriptive analysis were used. The findings revealed that age, father/guardian social economic status and daily study hours significantly contribute the academic performance of graduate students. A linear model was also proposed that will be helpful to improve the academic performance of graduate students at University level.

Keywords

References

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Article

School Mapping in the Light of Education Reforms in Pakistan

1Qurtuba University of Science & Information Technology, Peshawar, Pakistan


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 279-282
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Muhammad Majid Sabir. School Mapping in the Light of Education Reforms in Pakistan. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):279-282. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-2.

Correspondence to: Muhammad Majid Sabir, Qurtuba University of Science & Information Technology, Peshawar, Pakistan. Email: mmajidsabir@yahoo.com

Abstract

The main focus of this qualitative study is to address the prevailing situation of school mapping at provincial level of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and its twenty four districts to diagnose the major factors of the reluctances by the educational planners and more specifically to ascertain why its importance is not realized in Educational Management Information System (EMIS). Data were collected by means of interviews with provincial EMIS managers and Executive District Officers; and by means of telephone conversations from the rest of eight districts. The uniqueness of this study is that the results show that planners at Provincial and District levels are aware of the importance of school-mapping although vital efforts have not been made to use it as an instrument in planning.

Keywords

References

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Article

The Comparative Effect of Types of Contextual Clues on Iranian EFL Learners’ Prediction of the Meaning of Unknown Vocabularies

1Islamic Azad University, Central Tehran Branch


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(8), 272-278
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-8-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kolahi SH., Alikhademi Azam, Kehtari M.. The Comparative Effect of Types of Contextual Clues on Iranian EFL Learners’ Prediction of the Meaning of Unknown Vocabularies. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(8):272-278. doi: 10.12691/education-1-8-1.

Correspondence to: Alikhademi Azam, Islamic Azad University, Central Tehran Branch. Email: a_alikhademi@yahoo.com

Abstract

Understanding the meaning of unknown vocabularies has always been a great challenge for ESL/EFL learners. This study was an attempt to examine whether Iranian EFL learners’ use of contextual clues has any significant impact on their knowledge of unknown vocabularies. The participants of the study were Sixty Iranian intermediate learners of Kish institute in Tehran, Iran. To homogenize the participants in terms of their English language proficiency Practice Tests (PET) was run Forty participants whose score fell one standard deviation above and below the mean were selected to take part in the study. The participants then were randomly divided in to two groups. A Reading test was administered at this stage to check if the participants’ reading proficiency was not significantly different at the outset of the study. The experimental group received the treatment. Four types of contextual clue _ Explanation, Example, Antonym, Synonym _ were taught and practiced during ten sessions of instruction. The control group, on the other hand was taught based on the routine program with no emphasis on contextual clues. The reading section of another version of PET was administered as the post test. A t-test was run to analyze the results. The participants in the experimental group significantly outperformed those in the control group. The analysis of data revealed that knowledge and use of contextual clues has a significant impact on guessing the meaning of unknown vocabularies among Iranian EFL learners. Moreover, the researchers examined the comparative effect of types of contextual clue on learners’ prediction of the meaning of unknown vocabularies. Their finding revealed that synonyms initially have the most effect. Then, explanations (definitions) and antonyms alternatively have effects on learners’ prediction of the meaning of unknown vocabularies.

Keywords

References

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