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Article

Microbial Decolorization of Textile Dye by Bacillus Spp. ETL-79: An Innovative Biotechnological Aspect to Combat Textile Effluents

1Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied & Environmental Microbiology Lab, Enviro Technology Limited (CETP), Gujarat, India


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013, 1(3), 57-61
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Maulin P Shah, Patel KA, Nair SS, A M Darji. Microbial Decolorization of Textile Dye by Bacillus Spp. ETL-79: An Innovative Biotechnological Aspect to Combat Textile Effluents. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013; 1(3):57-61. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-5.

Correspondence to: Maulin P Shah, Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied & Environmental Microbiology Lab, Enviro Technology Limited (CETP), Gujarat, India. Email: shahmp@uniphos.com

Abstract

Isolation and identification of dye decolorizing bacterial isolate from textile dye effluent was carried out. The isolates of Bacillus spp. ETL-79 were isolated from the textile effluent samples collected from textile industries of Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India. Different parameters were used for optimizing. Conditions for maximum decolorization depend on the bacterial isolate. The results showed that the temperature (40°C), pH (8.00), Biological Oxygen Demand (220 mgl–1), Chemical Oxygen Demand (700 mgl–1), Total Suspended Solids (2800 mgl–1), Total Dissolved Solids (7500 mgl–1) and color over the prescribed fresh water limits. A potential bacterial strain was isolated and selected from the textile effluent on the basis of rapid azo dye Crystal violet (100mgl–1) decolorization and later identified as belonging to genus Bacillus based on Phenotypic characterization Effects of physicochemical parameters (pH, Temperature, etc.) on the Crystal violet decolorization by the Bacillus spp ETL-79 were studied. Decolorization was effective at pH 8, 35°C with starch and peptone as carbon and nitrogen sources and in static conditions. This decolorization potential increased the applicability of this microorganism for the dye removal.

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References

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Article

Optimization of Environmental Parameters on Decolorizatiion of Remazol Black B using Mixed culture

1Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied & Environmental Microbiology Lab, Enviro Technology Limited, Gujarat, India

2Laboratory of Environmental Bioremediation, Narmada Clean Tech Limited (FETP), Guajrat, India


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013, 1(3), 53-56
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Maulin P Shah, Patel KA, Nair SS, Darji AM, Shaktisinh J Maharaul. Optimization of Environmental Parameters on Decolorizatiion of Remazol Black B using Mixed culture. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013; 1(3):53-56. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-4.

Correspondence to: Maulin P Shah, Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied & Environmental Microbiology Lab, Enviro Technology Limited, Gujarat, India. Email: shahmp@uniphos.com

Abstract

In the present study, an attempt was made to examine the potential of mixed culture (contains Pseudomonas putida, Psueomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina) for decolorization of Remazol Black B dye in batch reactors. The effect of pH, temperature, inoculum, initial concentration of dye and initial concentration of glucose was studied with an aim to determine the optimal conditions required for maximum decolorization and degradation. The culture exhibited maximum decolorization ability at pH between 7-8 and at 30°C. A 10% (v/v) inoculum and 1% (w/v) glucose concentration were found to be the optimum for decolorization. A maximum of 98% decolorization was observed at 25 ppm initial concentration of dye after 18 hours of incubation period. At higher dye concentration of 300 ppm, the removal in colour was found to be 75% in 48 hours of incubation period. The results show that the enriched mixed culture from activated sludge has an excellent potential in removal of Remazol Black B dye from wastewater under aerobic conditions.

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References

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Article

Bioremoval of Nickel Using Pseudomonas fluorescens

1PG Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The American College, Madurai, India

2PG and Research Department of Zoology, The American College, Madurai, India


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013, 1(3), 48-52
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
R. S. Akram Husain, A. J. Thatheyus, D. Ramya. Bioremoval of Nickel Using Pseudomonas fluorescens. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013; 1(3):48-52. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-3.

Correspondence to: R. S. Akram Husain, PG Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The American College, Madurai, India. Email: jthatheyus@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

The bioremovel of nickel ions by Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied for the period of eight days by exposing to different concentrations of nickel (250, 500, 750 and 1000ppm). Experiments were designed to study the effect of dead cells and sugars on the biosorption of nickel ions. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS) analysis was carried out for the samples at an interval of two days. The highest nickel uptake was at 1000ppm concentration. Metal binding by bacteria has been shown to be profoundly influenced by the concentration of the metal.

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References

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Article

Protease Production by Fusarium oxysporum in Solid- State Fermentation Using Rice Bran

1Department of Microbiology, Shri Shivaji Science College Amravati, Amravati, India


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013, 1(3), 45-47
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Syed Sajeed Ali, N.N. Vidhale. Protease Production by Fusarium oxysporum in Solid- State Fermentation Using Rice Bran. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013; 1(3):45-47. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-2.

Correspondence to: Syed Sajeed Ali, Department of Microbiology, Shri Shivaji Science College Amravati, Amravati, India. Email: obaide2002@yahoo.com

Abstract

Agroindustrial wastes constitute valuable source for microbial cultivation and enzyme production. An attempt was made to study protease production by Fusarium oxysporum on agroindustrial waste rice bran under solid-state fermentation. Rice bran obtained from rice mill has proved to be efficient substrate for enzyme production by F. oxysporum. To study the maximum enzyme production the process parameters of fermentation where optimized. Maximum protease production i.e. (70.5U/g) was obtained with an initial moisture content of 50% (w/w) on incubation period of 72h at 35°C temperature with initial pH of substrate 7.0. The above data revealed that agroindustrial waste rice bran and optimized condition of solid-state fermentation can be successfully employed for protease production by Fusarium oxysporum.

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References

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Article

Cooling System Economy in Ethanol Production Using Thermotolerant Yeast Kluyveromyces Sp. IIPE453

1Sardar Swaran Singh National Institute of Renewable Energy, Kapurthala, India

2Biotechnology Area, Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun, India;Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India

3Biotechnology Area, Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun, India

4SRM Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamilnadu, India

5Department of Paper Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, Saharanpur Campus, India

6Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013, 1(3), 39-44
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sachin Kumar, Pratibha Dheeran, Surendra P. Singh, Indra M. Mishra, Dilip K. Adhikari. Cooling System Economy in Ethanol Production Using Thermotolerant Yeast Kluyveromyces Sp. IIPE453. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2013; 1(3):39-44. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-1-3-1.

Correspondence to: Sachin Kumar, Sardar Swaran Singh National Institute of Renewable Energy, Kapurthala, India. Email: sachin.biotech@gmail.com

Abstract

The growth of thermotolerant/ thermophilic ethanol producing yeast and the fermentation processes using sugary substrates are exothermic processes. If the fermenters are heat insulated, the requirement of heat for maintaining the fermentation broth for ethanol production may be reduced considerably. The heat generated due to growth of thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 was found to be 652kJ mol-1 at 50°C using glucose as a substrate. The heat generated due to ethanol formation by Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 was found to be 132.54kJ mol-1 of sugar consumed or 67.84kJ mol-1 of ethanol produced at 50°C using sugarcane molasses as substrate. This heat would be sufficient for maintaining the desired temperature, if insulated fermentation systems are used. Therefore, no additional heat would be required to maintain the temperature in fermentation process by thermotolerant yeast at 50°C.

Keywords

References

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