World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities
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World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities. 2018, 4(2), 69-74
DOI: 10.12691/wjssh-4-2-1
Open AccessArticle

Marginalization of the Pastoralist Pokot of North Western Kenya

Beneah M. Mutsotso1,

1Department of Sociology and Social Work, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya

Pub. Date: July 31, 2018

Cite this paper:
Beneah M. Mutsotso. Marginalization of the Pastoralist Pokot of North Western Kenya. World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities. 2018; 4(2):69-74. doi: 10.12691/wjssh-4-2-1

Abstract

The pastoralists Pokot have for over a century suffered systemic marginalization and neglect by successive governments of Kenya. The paper presents who the pastoralist Pokot are, where they live, origin, forms and manifestations of social marginalization they suffer. The paper traces the origin of the neglect and argues that the colonial government passed over the marginalization to the post independence government of Kenya with little or no change in perception. It utilizes diffusion of innovations theory by Everett Rogers to explain the lack of adoption of government/western ways of life which then, became the basis of marginalization. The paper draws upon primary, archival and other secondary data to demonstrate the social marginalization.

Keywords:
pokot marginalization adoption pastoralist government Kenya

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