World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities
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World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities. 2019, 5(3), 160-175
DOI: 10.12691/wjssh-5-3-6
Open AccessArticle

Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: The Missing Strand in the African Transformational Development Agenda

Vincent Kanyamuna1, , Derica Alba Kotzé2 and Million Phiri3

1Department of Development Studies, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

2Department of Development Studies, School of Social Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa

3Department of Population Studies, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

Pub. Date: September 17, 2019

Cite this paper:
Vincent Kanyamuna, Derica Alba Kotzé and Million Phiri. Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: The Missing Strand in the African Transformational Development Agenda. World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities. 2019; 5(3):160-175. doi: 10.12691/wjssh-5-3-6

Abstract

Today, monitoring and evaluation systems are structural arrangements many governments and other development agencies are building and strengthening to enhance their performance and as a way of demonstrating results to stakeholders. The systems are also used to meet internal information needs. The practice and commitment is more evident in developed than in developing countries. In many African countries, the practice and commitment towards implementing functional M & E systems is noticeably on the low side. Most M & E systems in Africa are still in their embryonic stage—not able to supply relevant information for stakeholder use. Even worse, the demand for M&E information by stakeholders, both internal and external is minimal among and across potential users in Africa. We have not seen a transformational resolve and thrive especially by governments and key development agencies to sustainably build and strengthen M & E systems in Africa. Nonetheless, for the African continent to face and resolve its several social, economic and political challenges, it is inevitable to dedicatedly engage in a transformational development agenda. Despite the gloomy M & E arrangements currently, there are notable efforts (though often fragmented) in some countries as well as in the continental and regional development blocs such as the AU, SADC, AMU, CEN-SAD, COMESA, EAC, ECCAS, ECOWAS, and the IGAD. This paper contends that commitment by African governments to building and sustaining M&E systems as an instrument of good governance should be top on the transformational development agenda—not rhetorically but pragmatically. Identified as the missing strand, M&E systems are deemed key to promoting and achieving the desired culture of results across the African continent. Troubled with endless and increasing reports on corruption and bad choices in development interventions due to lack of strategic prioritisation, M&E systems stand handy to offer evidence-based information to support sound decision making, policy formulation and implementation. Consequently, if Africa was not going to channel its political, organisational, human, technical, technological and financial resources towards transforming M & E in every country, the hope for a better Africa as enshrined in the continental Vision 2063 of the Africa We Want will remain a wish, only never to be realised. Essentially, a culture of results is something Africa and its people should cherish and pursue without thinking twice.

Keywords:
monitoring evaluation M&E system results-based management culture of results evidence-based whole-of-government M&E system results

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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