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Article

Electric Power Generation from Waste Heat

1Sarhad University of Science & IT, PAKISTAN

2Electrical Engineering, Sarhad University of Science & IT, PAKISTAN

3SARHAD University of Science & IT, PAKISTAN, MSc Electrical Power Engineering, BSc Electrical Engineering


Sustainable Energy. 2013, 1(2), 38-41
DOI: 10.12691/rse-1-2-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sana Ullah Khan, Irfan Khan, Engr. Hashmat Khan, Engr. Qazi Waqar Ali. Electric Power Generation from Waste Heat. Sustainable Energy. 2013; 1(2):38-41. doi: 10.12691/rse-1-2-5.

Correspondence to: Sana  Ullah Khan, Sarhad University of Science & IT, PAKISTAN. Email: Sanaullah_51@yahoo.com

Abstract

Waste heat is developed as a by-product in power generation, commercial procedures and electric machines, among others. Huge of spend warmed are designed by industry. Thermoelectric developer is one of the alternate sources for the growth of power. Thermoelectric developer is a device which transforms heat straight into electrical power, using a phenomenon called the "Seebeck effect". In this paper we will recommended a thermoelectric developer which will use invest warmed exhausted by the places for development of electric power. The suggested program will be depending on thermoelectric content known as bismuth telluride (Bi2Teз). This developer having no energy price because spend warmed is the opinions for this developer. In our suggested system we used voltmeters, ammeter and warmed wide range receptors to find the regards between the opinions warmed and the designed outcome power.

Keywords

References

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Article

Hydrogen Energy as Advance Renewable Resource

1Department of Chemical Engineering, NIT Raipur, India


Sustainable Energy. 2013, 1(2), 32-37
DOI: 10.12691/rse-1-2-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Krishna Kumar, Omprakash Sahu. Hydrogen Energy as Advance Renewable Resource. Sustainable Energy. 2013; 1(2):32-37. doi: 10.12691/rse-1-2-4.

Correspondence to: Omprakash  Sahu, Department of Chemical Engineering, NIT Raipur, India. Email: Lops0121@gmail.com

Abstract

Reducing the demand on fossil resources remains a significant concern for many nations. Renewable-based processes like solar- or wind-driven electrolysis and photo biological water splitting hold great promise for clean hydrogen production; however, advances must still be made before these technologies can be economically competitive. Approximately 95% of the hydrogen produced today comes from carbonaceous raw material, primarily fossil in origin. Only a fraction of this hydrogen is currently used for energy purposes; the bulk serves as a chemical feedstock for petrochemical, food, electronics and metallurgical processing industries. However, hydrogen’s share in the energy market is increasing with the implementation of fuel cell systems and the growing demand for zero-emission fuels. Hydrogen production will need to keep pace with this growing market. In this regard’s an effort has been made to study of hydrogen as new renewable energy resources.

Keywords

References

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Article

Numerical Simulation for Achieving Optimum Dimensions of a Solar Chimney Power Plant

1Department of Energy Engineering, Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

2Faculty of New Sciences & Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

3Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, University of Shahid Beheshti, Tehran, Iran


Sustainable Energy. 2013, 1(2), 26-31
DOI: 10.12691/rse-1-2-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M. Ghalamchi, M. Ghalamchi, T. Ahanj. Numerical Simulation for Achieving Optimum Dimensions of a Solar Chimney Power Plant. Sustainable Energy. 2013; 1(2):26-31. doi: 10.12691/rse-1-2-3.

Correspondence to: M.  Ghalamchi, Department of Energy Engineering, Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran. Email: Mehrdad.Ghalamchi.mech@gmail.com

Abstract

Renewable energies are playing a fundamental role in supplying energy, as these kinds of energies can be clean, low carbon and sustainable. Solar chimney power plant is a novel technology for electricity production from solar energy. A solar chimney power plant derives its mechanical power from the kinetic power of the hot air which rises through a tall chimney, the air being heated by solar energy through a transparent roof surrounding the chimney base. The performance evaluation of solar chimney power plant was done by FLUENT software by changing three parameters including collector slope, chimney diameter and entrance gap of collector. The results were validated with the solar chimney power plant which was constructed in Zanajn, Iran with 12 m height, 10 m collector radius and 10 degree Collector angle. By simulation and numerical optimization of many cases with dimensional variations, increasing 300 to 500 percent of chimney velocity and eventually increasing output power of system was observed in different cases.

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References

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Article

Energy in Perspective of Sustainable Development in Nigeria

1Mechanical Engineering Department, Covenant University, Ota


Sustainable Energy. 2013, 1(2), 14-25
DOI: 10.12691/rse-1-2-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sunday Olayinka Oyedepo. Energy in Perspective of Sustainable Development in Nigeria. Sustainable Energy. 2013; 1(2):14-25. doi: 10.12691/rse-1-2-2.

Correspondence to: Sunday  Olayinka Oyedepo, Mechanical Engineering Department, Covenant University, Ota. Email: Sunday.oyedepo@covenantuniversity.edu.ng

Abstract

Sustainable energy systems are necessary to save the natural resources avoiding environmental impacts which would compromise the development of future generations. Delivering sustainable energy will require an increased efficiency of the generation process including the demand side. This paper reviews the pattern of energy-use in Nigeria and makes a case for the implementation of an energy efficiency policy as a possible strategy to address the nation’s energy crisis. The study as well explores the role of industrial energy use in sustainable development in Nigeria and the potential sources to increase energy efficiency in industrial sector. The study showed that the pattern of electrical energy consumption in the industries reviewed was majorly from generating set while power supply from national grid compliment generating set if available; this is due to either low voltage or epileptic power supply from national grid. Direct and indirect sources that lead to electrical energy waste and in-efficient energy utilization in the industries were identified such as energy loss as a result of aging electric motor, worn out or slack / misaligned machine parts, excessive heating and cooling, use of low efficient lightings etc. The review paper shows that industrial energy efficiency in Nigeria is a readily achievable, cost effective and has potential of reduction in industrial consumption using good energy management practices and energy efficient equipment. This study will be of help to government, industrialists and industrial policy makers.

Keywords

References

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Article

Application of Eggshell Wastes as a Heterogeneous Catalyst for Biodiesel Production

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

2National Center of Excellence for Petroleum, Petrochemicals and Advanced Materials, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand


Sustainable Energy. 2013, 1(2), 7-13
DOI: 10.12691/rse-1-2-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Achanai Buasri, Nattawut Chaiyut, Vorrada Loryuenyong, Chaiwat Wongweang, Saranpong Khamsrisuk. Application of Eggshell Wastes as a Heterogeneous Catalyst for Biodiesel Production. Sustainable Energy. 2013; 1(2):7-13. doi: 10.12691/rse-1-2-1.

Correspondence to: Achanai Buasri, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. Email: achanai130@gmail.com

Abstract

The duck and chicken eggshell wastes were applied as raw materials for the preparation of heterogeneous catalyst in biodiesel production. Prior to use, the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) content in the waste shell was converted to calcium oxide (CaO) by calcining at 600-900C for 4h. The physicochemical properties of the solid oxide catalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The catalytic activity of the catalyst in transesterification of palm oil with methanol was evaluated, and the fuel properties of obtained biodiesel were measured. The effect of reaction time, reaction temperature, methanol/oil molar ratio, catalyst loading, and reusability of catalyst was also investigated. Eggshell waste is a bioresource for the production of heterogeneous base catalyst that can be successfully utilized for the synthesis of biodiesel with high purity.

Keywords

References

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