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Article

Taxonomy and Medicinal Uses of Euphorbiaceae (Spurge) Family of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

1Plant Taxonomy Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh


Research in Plant Sciences. 2013, 1(3), 74-80
DOI: 10.12691/plant-1-3-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
A.H.M. Mahbubur Rahman, Momota Akter. Taxonomy and Medicinal Uses of Euphorbiaceae (Spurge) Family of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. Research in Plant Sciences. 2013; 1(3):74-80. doi: 10.12691/plant-1-3-5.

Correspondence to: A.H.M.  Mahbubur Rahman, Plant Taxonomy Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh. Email: ahmmahbubur_rahman@yahoo.com

Abstract

Taxonomy and medicinal uses of the family Euphorbiaceae growing throughout the Rajshahi city, Bangladesh were studied during September 2012 to August 2013. A total of 16 species under 8 genera belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae were collected and identified. Out of the total number of species Acalypha indica L., Euphorbia hirta L., Euphorbia thymifolia L., Euphorbia tirucalli L., Euphorbia pulcherrima L., Euphorbia cotinifolia L., Croton bonplandianum Baill., Codiaeum variegatum (L.) A. Juss., Jatropha gossypifolia L., Jatropha curcas L., Manihot esculenta L., Ricinus communis L. were common and Acalypha hispida Burm. f., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia milii L., Putranjiva roxburghii L. were rare species in the study area. For each species botanical name, local name, habit, habitat, flower colour, flowering season, chromosome number and medicinal uses have been mentioned. The findings of this study could be used to enhance folk medicine for the betterment of rural or indigenous livelihoods.

Keywords

References

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[[1]  Ahmed, Z. U., Begum, Z. N. T., Hassan, M. A., Khondker, M., Kabir, S. M. H., Ahmad, M., Ahmed, A. T. A., Rahman, A. K. A., Haque, E. U. (Eds). Encyclopedia of Flora and Fauna of Bangladesh Angiosperms; Dicotyledons. Asiat. Soc. Bangladesh, Dhaka. Vol 6-12, 2007-2009.
 
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[[5]  Hooker, J.D. Flora of British India. L. Vol. 1-7. Reeve and Co. Ltd. London. 1961.
 
Show More References
[6]  Huq, A.M. Plant Names of Bangladesh. Bangladesh National Herbarium, BARC, Dhaka, Bangladesh. 1986.
 
[7]  Judd, W. S., Campbell, C. S., Kellog, Stevens, P. F. Plant Systematics: a Phylogenetic Approach. Sunderland Massachussetts: Sinauer Associates Inc. Publisher pp. 464. 1999.
 
[8]  Kirtikar, K. R., Basu, B. D. Indian Medicinal Plants. Vol. 1-4. Lalit Mohan Basu, Alhabad, India. 1987.
 
[9]  Pasha, M. K., Uddin, S. B. Dictionary of Plant Names of Bangladesh (Vascular Plants). Janokalyan Prokashani. Chittagong, Dhaka, Bangladesh. 2013.
 
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[11]  Rahman, A.H. M.M. Angiospermic flora of Rajshahi district, Bangladesh. American Journal of Life Sciences. 1(3): 105-112. 2013.
 
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Article

Bioremediation of Arsenic and Lead by Plants and Microbes from Contaminated Soil

1Department of Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia

2Department Plant Sciences and Horticulture, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia


Research in Plant Sciences. 2013, 1(3), 68-73
DOI: 10.12691/plant-1-3-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mohd Sayeed Akhtar, Birtaut Chali, Tanweer Azam. Bioremediation of Arsenic and Lead by Plants and Microbes from Contaminated Soil. Research in Plant Sciences. 2013; 1(3):68-73. doi: 10.12691/plant-1-3-4.

Correspondence to: Mohd  Sayeed Akhtar, Department of Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia. Email: sayeedbot@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

The persistence of heavy metals in the environment may pollute or contaminate soils and aqueous streams as both natural components or as the result of human activity. Bioremediation process in this regards is an option that offers the possibility to destroy or render harmless various contaminants using plants and microbes. Amongst the various bioremediation processes, phytoremediation and bioremediation by microbes are quite effective. Phytoremediation includes the removal of contaminants with the help of green plants, while the microbial bioremediation includes the removal of heavy metals by microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, yeast and algae) as sorbets. Amongst the various heavy metal contaminants arsenic and lead are recognized as the leading toxicants worldwide and having the various toxic effects on human and animal health as well as on the environment. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the arsenic and lead contaminant in soil and also the mechanism of removal of these toxic metals from the contaminated sources by the potent application of plants and microbes.

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References

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Article

Assessment of Angiosperm Weeds of Rajshahi, Bangladesh with Emphasis on Medicinal Plants

1Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh


Research in Plant Sciences. 2013, 1(3), 62-67
DOI: 10.12691/plant-1-3-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
A. H. M. Mahbubur Rahman. Assessment of Angiosperm Weeds of Rajshahi, Bangladesh with Emphasis on Medicinal Plants. Research in Plant Sciences. 2013; 1(3):62-67. doi: 10.12691/plant-1-3-3.

Correspondence to: A.  H. M. Mahbubur Rahman, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh. Email: ahmmahbubur_rahman@yahoo.com

Abstract

Assessment of angiosperm weeds of Rajshahi, Bangladesh has been studied. A total of 155 angiosperm weed species under 125 genera and 50 families were recorded. Of these, Magnoliopsida (Dicots) was represented by 138 species under 109 genera and 43 families while Liliopsida (Monocots) was represented by 17 species under 16 genera and 7 families. Asteraceae were the largest family in Magnoliopsida represented by 27 species, and Araceae were the largest family in Liliopsida represented by 6 species. Fifty (50) medicinal plants have been documented with their uses for the cure of more than 61 diseases, and some of these are abscess, asthma, abortion, cough, cold, small pox, constipation, dysentery, diarrhea, diabetes, eczema, fever, and fracture of bone, headache, heart disease, itches, jaundice, menstrual disease, paralysis, piles, skin diseases, snake-bite, toothache, vomiting, worm, wound and others. This detailed information will be helpful for the pharmacognosist, botanist, ethno-botanist and pharmacologist for the collection and identification of the plant for their research work.

Keywords

References

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[[1]  Ahmed, Z. U., Begum, Z. N. T., Hassan, M. A., Khondker, M., Kabir, S. M. H., Ahmad, M., Ahmed, A. T. A., Rahman, A. K. A., Haque, E. U.(Eds). Encyclopedia of Flora and Fauna of Bangladesh. Angiosperms; Dicotyledons. Vol 6-12. Asiat. Soc. Bangladesh, Dhaka. 2007-2009.
 
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Article

Induction and Proliferation of in vitro Mass of Callus of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal

1Central Department of Botany, Tribhuvan University


Research in Plant Sciences. 2013, 1(3), 58-61
DOI: 10.12691/plant-1-3-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Suraj Raj Adhikari, Bijaya Pant. Induction and Proliferation of in vitro Mass of Callus of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal. Research in Plant Sciences. 2013; 1(3):58-61. doi: 10.12691/plant-1-3-2.

Correspondence to: Suraj  Raj Adhikari, Central Department of Botany, Tribhuvan University. Email: adhikarisr@gmail.com

Abstract

Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal. commonly known as “Aswhoganda”, belongs to the family Solanaceae is an important medicinal plant and a major source of alkaloids and steroids. Induction of callus was observed from stem explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with various concentrations and combinations of growth hormones viz, 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP), α-Napthalene acetic acid (NAA), 2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D) and kinetin. All the hormone supplemented media gave response for callus growth. The callus was compact and yellowish brown color in all culture condition. The best growth of callus was observed in the MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mgL1BAP + 1.5 mgL-1 NAA; followed by MS medium supplement with 0.5 mgL-1 BAP + 0.5 mgL-1 NAA, 0.5 mgL-1 BAP + 2.0 mgL-1NAA and 1.0 mgL-1 BAP + 1.5 mgL-1NAA at 8 weeks. Mass production of callus might be used for production and isolation of secondary metabolites for medicinal propose in W. somnifera.

Keywords

References

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Article

A Taxonomic and Ethno-Medicinal Study of Species from Moraceae (Mulberry) Family in Bangladesh Flora

1Plant Taxonomy Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh


Research in Plant Sciences. 2013, 1(3), 53-57
DOI: 10.12691/plant-1-3-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
A.H.M. Mahbubur Rahman, Anamika Khanom. A Taxonomic and Ethno-Medicinal Study of Species from Moraceae (Mulberry) Family in Bangladesh Flora. Research in Plant Sciences. 2013; 1(3):53-57. doi: 10.12691/plant-1-3-1.

Correspondence to: A.H.M.  Mahbubur Rahman, Plant Taxonomy Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh. Email: ahmmahbubur_rahman@yahoo.com

Abstract

Taxonomy and ethno-medicinal investigation on the family Moraceae growing throughout the Rajshahi city, Bangladesh was carried out during September 2012 to August 2013. A total of 9 species under 7 genera belonging to the family Moraceae were collected and recorded for their use in various ailments. Herbal medicines have a strong traditional or conceptual base and the potential to be useful as drugs in terms of safely and effectiveness, leads for treating different diseases. The present article gives an account of such a medicinally important family Moraceae which comprise both wild and cultivated species. Out of the total number of species Artocarpus heterophyllus Lamk., Artocarpus lacucha Buch-Ham., Ficus benghalensis L., Ficus hispida L., Ficus racemosa L., Ficus religiosa L., Morus alba L. were very common and Ficus elastica Roxb ex Hornem. and Ficus pumila L. were rare species in the study area. Thus a survey was carried out, to record the traditional health care remedies currently practiced by the local people.

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