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Article

Condensing Osteitis Lesions in Eastern Anatolian Turkish Population

1Inonu University, Dentistry Faculty, Department of Mouth Tooth and Jaw Radiology, Malatya, TURKİYE, Turk


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 17-20
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Oğuzhan ALTUN, Numan DEDEOĞLU, Esma UMAR, Ümit YOLCU, Ahmet Hüseyin ACAR. Condensing Osteitis Lesions in Eastern Anatolian Turkish Population. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):17-20. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-3.

Correspondence to: Numan  DEDEOĞLU, Inonu University, Dentistry Faculty, Department of Mouth Tooth and Jaw Radiology, Malatya, TURKİYE, Turk. Email: dedenu@gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of condensing osteitis lesions in Eastern Anatolian Turkish population. About condensing osteitis lesions, these were evaluated; sex, localization, side, age, shape and status of involved teeth (caries, restoration etc.). Methods: This retrospective study was carried out using panoramic radiographs of 962 patients who came to for some dental problems to Inonu University Faculty of Dentistry. Status of involved teeth (caries, restoration etc.), sex, age, shape, localization and side were evaluated. Results: The evaluated of 962 patients, 539 female and 423 were male. 29 condensing osteitis lesions were found in 26 patients; 7 males and 19 females had once or two condensing osteitis lesion in apical or interradiculer area detected by radiographic evaluation. Most condensing osteitis lesion were in the mandibular molar region 82,8%; mandibular first molar (n=21) was the most frequent condensing osteitis involved tooth (72,4%). Of these 29 condensing osteitis lesions, 15 (51,7%) were detected in the teeth that involved deep caries. Conclusion: Condensing osteitis lesions had a prevalence of 2.7%, with mandibular molar region was the most included region. Deep cariesly teeth were the most common related to COL and mandibular first molars were the most involved teeth in the Eastern Anatolian Turkish population.

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References

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Article

Rare Case Reports of Non Syndromic Hypodontia – Genes at Work

1Oral Medicine and Radiology, Vasantdada Patil Dental College and Hospital, Sangli, India


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 14-16
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Arati Paranjpe, Priyanka Sawant, Avinash Kshar, Raghvendra Byakodi. Rare Case Reports of Non Syndromic Hypodontia – Genes at Work. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):14-16. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-2.

Correspondence to: Arati  Paranjpe, Oral Medicine and Radiology, Vasantdada Patil Dental College and Hospital, Sangli, India. Email: arati038@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

Agenesis of one or more permanent teeth is a common developmental dental anomaly in human beings. In the literature, many terms are used to describe missing teeth like oligodontia, anodontia, aplasia of teeth, congenitally missing teeth, absence of teeth, agenesis of teeth and lack of teeth. The etiology of missing teeth may be environmental factors like infection, trauma, drugs, chemotherapy or radiotherapy or may be genetic. The most often missing permanent teeth, excluding third molars, are the second premolars and the lateral incisors. Here we report two cases of hypodontia of permanent teeth which are familial and without the presence of any syndrome. We have also reviewed literature of similar cases published till date.

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References

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Article

Ultrasonic Management of Calcified Canal: A Case Report

1Maratha Mandal’s NGH Institute of Dental Sciences & Research Centre, Belgaum, Karnataka, India


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 11-13
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Prasad Koli, Madhu Pujar, Viraj Yalgi, Veerendra Uppin, Hemant Vagarali, Namrata Hosmani. Ultrasonic Management of Calcified Canal: A Case Report. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):11-13. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-1.

Correspondence to: Prasad  Koli, Maratha Mandal’s NGH Institute of Dental Sciences & Research Centre, Belgaum, Karnataka, India. Email: priypkoli@gmail.com

Abstract

Calcification of the root canal system is a well-studied phenomenon. Calcification of the dental pulp may be discrete or diffuse in its form. Richman first introduced the concept of using ultrasonics (US) in endodontics. Dental traumatic injuries may be a cause for calcification of the pulp space. This case report demonstrates the use of US in the management of calcified canal having periapical pathology. US is considered an effective method in managing calcified canals in gaining access. With the use of US, access refinement and location of calcified canals have generated more predictable results.

Keywords

References

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