You are here:

Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology

ISSN (Print): ISSN Pending

ISSN (Online): ISSN Pending

Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ORAL

Content: Volume 2, Issue 2

Article

Replacement of A Mandibular Molar with Implant Retained Single Crown

1Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dental Education and Advanced studies, Madhya Pradesh, India

2Department of Prosthodontics, College of dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan, (KSA)

3Department of Endodontics, Subharti Dental College, Subharti University, Meerut, India


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 25-27
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-6
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Manas Singh, Khurshid A Mattoo, Shailesh Jain. Replacement of A Mandibular Molar with Implant Retained Single Crown. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):25-27. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-6.

Correspondence to: Khurshid  A Mattoo, Department of Prosthodontics, College of dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan, (KSA). Email: drkamattoo@rediffmail.com

Abstract

Among various challenges to restore a single tooth implant in the posterior region of the oral cavity is the creation of harmonious gingival contour beneath the restoration and near the abutment –gingiva interface so as not to allow plaque accumulation within this inaccessible zone. Deficiencies in the soft or hard tissue in the edentulous space are usually the most common obstacles to achieve a gingival symmetry around the proposed restoration, besides the factors like accessibility of cleansing aids to the area. This article describes a novel approach to eliminate the ridge or soft tissue deficiencies by over contouring and undermining soft tissue around the healing abutment at the second stage implant surgery.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[
[1]  Brånemark PI, Adell R, Hansson BO, et al. Intraosseous anchorage of dental prosthesis: I-experimental studies. Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg 1969; 3: 81-100.
 
[2]  Lewis S. Treatment planning: teeth versus implants. Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 1996; 16: 366-77.
 
[3]  Matosian GS. Treatment planning for the future: endodontics, post and core, and periodontal surgery: or an implant? Journal of the California Dental Association 2003; 31: 323-5.
 
[4]  Hutter JW. Implants versus the natural tooth: stand up for what we know is right. J Endod 2001; 27: 637.
 
[5]  Torabinejad M. Apples and oranges. J Endod 2003; 29:5 41-2.
 
Show More References
6]  Felton DA. Implant or root canal therapy: a prosthodontist’s view. J Esthet Restor Dent 2005; 17: 197-9.
 
7]  Moiseiwitsch J. Do dental implants toll the end of endodontics? Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2002; 93: 633-4.
 
8]  Albrektsson T, Zarb GA, Worthington P, et al. The long term efficacy of currently used dental implants: a review and proposed criteria of success. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 1986; 1: 11.
 
9]  Smith DE, Zarb GA. Criteria for success of osseointegrated endosseous implants. J Prosthet Dent 1989; 62: 567-72.
 
10]  Jaffin RA, Berman CL. The excessive loss of Brånemark fixtures in Type IV bone: A 5-year analysis. J Periodontol 1991; 62: 2-4.
 
11]  Block MS, Gardiner D, Kent JN, Misiek DJ, Finger IM, Guerra L. Hydroxyapatite-coated cylindrical implants in the posterior mandible: 10-year observations. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 1996; 11: 626-633.
 
12]  Artzi Z, Tal H, Moses O, Kozlovsky A. Mucosal considerations for osseointegrated implants. J Prosthet Dent 1993; 70: 427-432.
 
13]  Bauman GR, Mills M, Rapley JW, Hallmon WW. Plaque induced inflammation around implants. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 1992; 7: 330-337.
 
14]  Mombelli A, Marxer M, Gaberthuel T, Grunder U, Lang NP. The microbiota of osseointegrated implants in patients with a history of periodontal disease. J Clin Periodontol 1995; 22: 124-130.
 
15]  Kohavi D, Greenberg R, Raviv E, Sela MN. Subgingival and supragingival microbial flora around healthy osseointegrated implants in partially edentulous patients. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 1994; 9:673-678.
 
16]  Meffert RM, Langer B, Fritz ME. Dental implants: A review. J Periodontol 1992; 63: 859-870.
 
17]  Neale D, Chee WW. Development of implant soft tissue emergence profile: a technique. J Prosthet Dent 1994; 72: 364-7
 
18]  Siebert JS. Reconstruction of deformed, partially edentulous ridges using full thickness inlay graft, 1: technique and wound healing. Compend Contin Educ Dent 1983; 4: 437-53
 
19]  Albrektsson T, Dahl E, Enbom L, et al. Osseointegrated oral implants. A Swedish multicenter study of 8139 consecutively inserted Nobelpharma implants. J Periodontol 1988; 59: 287-296.
 
20]  Hebel KS, Gajjar RC. Cement-retained versus screw retained implant restorations: Achieving optimal occlusion and esthetics in implant dentistry. J Prosthet Dent 1997; 77: 28-35.
 
21]  Taylor TD, Agar JR, Vogiatzi T. Implant prosthodontics: Current perspectives and future directions. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2000; 15: 66-75.
 
Show Less References

Article

Fordyce Granules Associated with Hypopigmentation of Facial Skin

1Department of Prosthodontics, College of dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan, (KSA)

2Department of Prosthodontics, Subharti Dental College, Subharti University, Meerut, India

3Department of Oral Medicine, Subharti Dental College, Subharti University, Meerut, India


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 23-24
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-5
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Khurshid A Mattoo, Manas Singh, Swati Gupta. Fordyce Granules Associated with Hypopigmentation of Facial Skin. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):23-24. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-5.

Correspondence to: Khurshid  A Mattoo, Department of Prosthodontics, College of dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan, (KSA). Email: drkamattoo@rediffmail.com

Abstract

Fordyce granules are referred to as benign sebaceous glands, which are ectopic in distribution and are characterized by the multiple light yellow raise papules, occurring mainly in the lip region. Observed mainly in adults, the disease is rarely associated with physiological skin hypopigmentation. This case report describes a case of an elderly patient who presented depigmentation of skin over the face with unilateral Fordyce granules on the left side of the buccal mucosa.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[[
[1]  Bohn CL. Fordyce condition; sebaceous gland tumors of the mucosa of the cheeks. Ugeskr Laeger. 1952; 114: 1105-07.
 
[2]  Olivier JH. Fordyce granules on the prolabial and oral mucous membranes of a selected population. SADJ.2006; 61: 072-074
 
[3]  James WD, Berger TG, Elston DM. Andrew's disease of the skin. Clinical dermatology. 10th Ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2006: 800.
 
[4]  Ahmed TSS, Priore JD, Seykora JT. Tumors of the appendages. In: Elder DE, Elenitsas R, Johnson BL, Murphy GF, editors. Lever's histopathology of the skin. 10th Ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009. pp. 872-873.
 
[5]  Fordyce JA. A peculiar affection of the mucous membrane of the lips and oral cavity. J Cutan Dis. 1896; 14:413-419.
 
Show More References
6]  Nakada T, Inoue F, Iwasaki M, Nagayama K, Tanaka T. Ectopic sebaceous glands in the esophagus. Am J Gastroenterol. 1995; 90: 501-503
 
7]  Kushima R, Von Hinüber G, Lessel W, Stolte M, Borchard F. Sebaceous gland metaplasia in cardiac-type mucosa of the oesophago-gastric junction. Virchows Arch. 1996; 428: 297-299.
 
8]  Fichera G, Santanocito A. Pilo-sebaceous cystic ectopy of the uterine cervix. Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol. 1989; 16: 21-25.
 
9]  Richfield DF. Sebaceous gland on sole of foot? Arch Dermatol. 1980; 116: 383.
 
10]  Wolff M, Rosai J, Wright DH. Sebaceous glands within the thymus: report of three cases. Hum Pathol. 1984; 15: 341-343.
 
11]  Kovero O. A sebaceous gland in the dorsal surface of the tongue. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1989; 18:266.
 
12]  Mansur AT and Aydingoz IE. Unilateral buccal Fordyce spots with ipsilateral facial paralysis: A sign of Neuro – sebaceous connection. Acta Dermato Venereologica 2012; 92 (2): 177-178.
 
13]  Baeder FM, Pelino JE, de Almeida ER, Duarte DA, Santos MT. High-power diode laser use on Fordyce granule excision: a case report. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2010: 9: 321-324.
 
14]  Kim YJ, Kang HY, Lee ES, Kim YC. Treatment of Fordyce spots with 5-aminolaevulinic acid-Photodynamic therapy. Br J Dermatol. 2007; 156: 399-400.
 
Show Less References

Article

Muco-cutaneous Keratoacanthoma Involving Maxillary Lip

1Department of Prosthodontics, College of dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan, (KSA)

2Department of Prosthodontics, Ideas dental college, Bareilly, India

3Department of Prosthodontics, Teerthankar Mahaveer University, Moradabad, India


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 21-22
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Khurshid A Mattoo, Manas Singh, Vishwadeepak Singh. Muco-cutaneous Keratoacanthoma Involving Maxillary Lip. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):21-22. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-4.

Correspondence to: Khurshid  A Mattoo, Department of Prosthodontics, College of dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan, (KSA). Email: drkamattoo@rediffmail.com

Abstract

Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a benign proliferative lesion of the skin that frequently occurs on sun exposed areas like the face and extremities. Originating within the sebaceous apparatus of the skin, the tumor can be difficult to differentiate from a well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Although the tumor has been reported to occur on the lower lip, this article presents a unique and rare case of keratoacanthoma involving the maxillary lip. The behavior of such tumor and its management has also been discussed.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[[[
[1]  Fisher BK, Elliott GB. On the origin of keratoacanthoma: reflections on an unusual lesion. Can Med Assoc J. 1965; 93:272-3.
 
[2]  Hardman FG. Keratoacanthoma on the lips. Br J Oral Surg. 1971; 9: 46-53.
 
[3]  Schwartz RA. Keratoacanthoma. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1994; 30:1-19; quiz 20-2.
 
[4]  Karnauchow PN. A lesion simulating squamous carcinoma of the lip (keratoacanthoma). Can Med Assoc J. 1958; 78: 346-8.
 
[5]  De Visscher JG, Van der Wal KG, Blanken R, Willemse F. Treatment of giant keratoacanthoma of the skin of the lower lip with intralesional methotrexate: a case report. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2002; 60: 93-5.
 
Show More References
6]  De Visscher JG, Van der Wal JE, Starink TM, Tiwari RM, van der Waal I. Giant keratoacanthoma of the lower lip. Report of a case of spontaneous regression. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 1996; 81: 193-6.
 
7]  Philip HM, Eduardo C, Scott RG. Pathology of the skin with clinical correlations. 3rd ed. Boston: Elsevier Mosby; 2005.
 
8]  Aroni K, Mastoraki A, Agrogiannis G, Ioannidis E, Patsouris E. Successful treatment of keratoacanthoma centrifugum marginatum with local application of imiquimod cream. Int J Dermatol 2007;46:1321
 
9]  Weedon D, Barnett L. Keratoacanthoma centrifugum marginatum. Arch Dermatol 1975; 111: 1024.
 
10]  Eversole LR, Leider AS, Alexander G. Intraoral and labial keratoacanthoma. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1982; 54:663-7.
 
11]  Philip HM, Eduardo C, Scott RG. Pathology of the skin with clinical correlations. 3rd ed. Boston: Elsevier Mosby; 2005.
 
12]  Borkhatariya PB, Gupta S, Bang D, Rawal RC. Keratoacanthoma centrifugum marginatum: case report and review of literature. Indian J Dermatol 2011; 56: 455-6.
 
13]  Clausen OP, Aass HC, Beigi M, Purdie KJ, Proby CM, Brown VL, et al. Are keratoacanthomas variants of squamous cell carcinomas? A comparison of chromosomal aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization. J Invest Dermatol. 2006; 126: 2308-15.
 
14]  Ramos LM, Cardoso SV, Loyola AM, Rocha MA, Durighetto-Júnior AF. Keratoacanthoma of the inferior lip: review and report of case with spontaneous regression. J Appl Oral Sci. 2009; 17: 262-5.
 
15]  Griffiths RW. Keratoacanthoma observed. Br J Plast Surg. 2004; 57: 485-501.
 
Show Less References

Article

Condensing Osteitis Lesions in Eastern Anatolian Turkish Population

1Inonu University, Dentistry Faculty, Department of Mouth Tooth and Jaw Radiology, Malatya, TURKİYE, Turk


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 17-20
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Oğuzhan ALTUN, Numan DEDEOĞLU, Esma UMAR, Ümit YOLCU, Ahmet Hüseyin ACAR. Condensing Osteitis Lesions in Eastern Anatolian Turkish Population. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):17-20. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-3.

Correspondence to: Numan  DEDEOĞLU, Inonu University, Dentistry Faculty, Department of Mouth Tooth and Jaw Radiology, Malatya, TURKİYE, Turk. Email: dedenu@gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of condensing osteitis lesions in Eastern Anatolian Turkish population. About condensing osteitis lesions, these were evaluated; sex, localization, side, age, shape and status of involved teeth (caries, restoration etc.). Methods: This retrospective study was carried out using panoramic radiographs of 962 patients who came to for some dental problems to Inonu University Faculty of Dentistry. Status of involved teeth (caries, restoration etc.), sex, age, shape, localization and side were evaluated. Results: The evaluated of 962 patients, 539 female and 423 were male. 29 condensing osteitis lesions were found in 26 patients; 7 males and 19 females had once or two condensing osteitis lesion in apical or interradiculer area detected by radiographic evaluation. Most condensing osteitis lesion were in the mandibular molar region 82,8%; mandibular first molar (n=21) was the most frequent condensing osteitis involved tooth (72,4%). Of these 29 condensing osteitis lesions, 15 (51,7%) were detected in the teeth that involved deep caries. Conclusion: Condensing osteitis lesions had a prevalence of 2.7%, with mandibular molar region was the most included region. Deep cariesly teeth were the most common related to COL and mandibular first molars were the most involved teeth in the Eastern Anatolian Turkish population.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[[
[1]  Bender LB, Mori K. The radiopaque lesion: A diagnostic consideration. Endod Dent Traumatol 1985; 1: 2-12.
 
[2]  Williams TP, Brooks SL. A longitudinal study of idiopathic osteosclerosis and condensing osteitis. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 1998; 27: 275-8.
 
[3]  Stheeman SE, Milleman PA, Hof MA, Stelt PF. Diagnostic confidence and the accuracy of treatment decisions for radiopaque periapical lesions. Int Endod J 1995; 28: 121-8.
 
[4]  Ingle JI, Bakland LK, Endodontics. 5th ed. Hamilton: BC Decker Inc; 2002.
 
[5]  Miloglu O, Yalcın E, Buyukkurt MC, Acemoğlu H. The frequency and characteristics of idiopathic osteosclerosis and condensing osteitis lesions in a Turkish patient population. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal 2009; 14: 640-5.
 
Show More References
6]  Çağlayan F, Tozoğlu U. Incidental findings in the maxillofacial region detected by cone beam CT. Diagn Interv Radiol 2012; 18: 159-63.
 
7]  Eliasson S, Halvarsson C, Ljungheimer C. Periapical condensing osteitis and endodontic treatment. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol 1984; 57: 195-9.
 
8]  Marmary, Y. and G. Kutiner. A radiographic survey of periapical jawbone lesions. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol 1986. 61: 405-8.
 
9]  Verzak Z, Celap B, Modric VE, Soric P, Karlovic Z. The prevalence of idiopathic osteosclerosis and condensing osteitis in Zagreb population. Acta Clin Croat 2012. 51: 573-577.
 
10]  Avramidou FM, Markou E, Lambrianidis T. Cross-sectional study of the radiographic appearance of radiopaque lesions of the jawbones in a sample of Greek dental patients. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2008; 106: 38-43.
 
11]  Stabholz A, Shekter M, Shwartz Z. Condensing Osteitis and Chronic Hyperplastic Pulpitis in the Same Pulpally Involved Tooth. Quintessence Int Dent Dig 1982; 13: 137-138.
 
12]  Green T, Walton RE, Clark JM, Maixner D. Histologic examination of condensing osteitis in cadaver specimens. J endod 2013; 39: 977-979.
 
13]  Morse, D.R., J.V. Esposito, and C. Yesilsoy. Recall radiopaque response determined from radiographic examination of 211 consecutive cases with initial periapical pathosis. Quintessence Int 1985; 16: 419-28.
 
14]  Park HS, Lee YJ, Jeong SH, Kwon TG. Density of the alveolar and basal bones of the maxilla and the mandible. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2008; 133: 30-37.
 
Show Less References

Article

Rare Case Reports of Non Syndromic Hypodontia – Genes at Work

1Oral Medicine and Radiology, Vasantdada Patil Dental College and Hospital, Sangli, India


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 14-16
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Arati Paranjpe, Priyanka Sawant, Avinash Kshar, Raghvendra Byakodi. Rare Case Reports of Non Syndromic Hypodontia – Genes at Work. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):14-16. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-2.

Correspondence to: Arati  Paranjpe, Oral Medicine and Radiology, Vasantdada Patil Dental College and Hospital, Sangli, India. Email: arati038@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

Agenesis of one or more permanent teeth is a common developmental dental anomaly in human beings. In the literature, many terms are used to describe missing teeth like oligodontia, anodontia, aplasia of teeth, congenitally missing teeth, absence of teeth, agenesis of teeth and lack of teeth. The etiology of missing teeth may be environmental factors like infection, trauma, drugs, chemotherapy or radiotherapy or may be genetic. The most often missing permanent teeth, excluding third molars, are the second premolars and the lateral incisors. Here we report two cases of hypodontia of permanent teeth which are familial and without the presence of any syndrome. We have also reviewed literature of similar cases published till date.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[[[[
[1]  Vahid-Dastjerdi E, Borzabadi-Farahani A, Mahdian M, Amini N. Non-syndromic hypodontia in an Iranian orthodontic population. J Oral Sci. 2010; 52 (3): 455-61.
 
[2]  Shashikiran ND, Karthik V, Subbareddy VV. Multiple congenitally missing primary teeth: report of a case. Pediatr Dent. 2002; 24 (2): 149-52.
 
[3]  Fukuta Y, Totsuka M, Takeda Y, Yamamoto H. Congenital absence of the permanent canines: a clinico-statistical study. J Oral Sci. 2004; 46 (4): 247-52.
 
[4]  Peker I, Kaya E, Darendeliler-Yaman S. Clinical and radiographical evaluation of non-syndromic hypodontia and hyperdontia in permanent dentition. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2009; 14 (8): e393-7.
 
[5]  Vanishree G, Reddy VS. Oligodontia of permanent teeth- Rare case report. AEDJ. 2010; 2 (4): 101-4.
 
Show More References
6]  Newman GV, Newman RA. Report of four familial cases with congenitally missing mandibular incisors. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1998; 114 (2): 195-207.
 
7]  Larmour CJ, Mossey PA, Thind BS, Forgie AH, Stirrups DR. Hypodontia - A retrospective review of prevalence and etiology. Part 1. Quintessence Int 2005; 36 (4): 263-70.
 
8]  Bala M, Pathak A. Ectodermal dysplasia with true anodontia. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol. 2011; 15 (2): 244-6.
 
9]  Vastardis H, Karimbux N, Guthua SW, Seidman JG, Seidman CE. A human MSX1 homeodomain missense mutation causes selective tooth agenesis. Nat Genet. 1996; 13 (4): 417- 21.
 
10]  Stockton DW, Das P, Goldenberg M, D’Souza RN, Patel PI. Mutation of PAX9 is associated with oligodontia. Nat Genet. 2000; 24 (1): 18-9.
 
11]  Frazier-Bowers SA, Guo DC, Cavender A, Xue L, Evans B, King T et al. A novel mutation in human PAX9 causes molar oligodontia. J Dent Res. 2002; 81 (2): 129-33.
 
12]  Lidral AC, Reising BC. The role of MSX1 in human tooth agenesis. J Dent Res 2002; 81 (4): 274-8.
 
13]  Das P, Stockton DW, Bauer C, Shaffer LG, D'Souza RN, Wright T et al. Haploinsufficiency of PAX9 is associated with autosomal dominant hypodontia. Hum Genet. 2002; 110 (4): 371-6.
 
14]  Ranta R, Hereditary agenesis of ten maxillary posterior teeth: a family history. ASDC J Dent Child. 1985; 52 (2): 125-7.
 
15]  Lyngstadaas SP, Nordbo H, Gedde-Dahl T Jr, Thrane PS. On the genetics of hypodontia and microdontia: synergism or allelism of major genes in a family with six affected members. J Med Genet. 1996; 33 (2): 137-42.
 
16]  Tao R, Jin B, Guo SZ, Qing W, Feng GY, Brooks DG et al. A novel missense mutation of the EDA gene in a Mongolian family with congenital hypodontia. J Hum Genet. 2006; 51 (5): 498-502.
 
Show Less References

Article

Ultrasonic Management of Calcified Canal: A Case Report

1Maratha Mandal’s NGH Institute of Dental Sciences & Research Centre, Belgaum, Karnataka, India


Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014, 2(2), 11-13
DOI: 10.12691/oral-2-2-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Prasad Koli, Madhu Pujar, Viraj Yalgi, Veerendra Uppin, Hemant Vagarali, Namrata Hosmani. Ultrasonic Management of Calcified Canal: A Case Report. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Radiology. 2014; 2(2):11-13. doi: 10.12691/oral-2-2-1.

Correspondence to: Prasad  Koli, Maratha Mandal’s NGH Institute of Dental Sciences & Research Centre, Belgaum, Karnataka, India. Email: priypkoli@gmail.com

Abstract

Calcification of the root canal system is a well-studied phenomenon. Calcification of the dental pulp may be discrete or diffuse in its form. Richman first introduced the concept of using ultrasonics (US) in endodontics. Dental traumatic injuries may be a cause for calcification of the pulp space. This case report demonstrates the use of US in the management of calcified canal having periapical pathology. US is considered an effective method in managing calcified canals in gaining access. With the use of US, access refinement and location of calcified canals have generated more predictable results.

Keywords

References

[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[
[1]  Bernick S, Nedelman C. “Effect of aging on the human pulp.” J Endod., 1(3):88-94. Mar 1975.
 
[2]  Morse DR. “Age-related changes of the dental pulp complex and their relationship to systemic aging.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 72(6):721-45. Dec 1991.
 
[3]  Quigley MB. “Functional and geriatric changes of human pulp.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 32(5):795-806. Nov 1971.
 
[4]  Sener S, Cobankara FK, Akgünlü F. “Calcifications of the pulp chamber: prevalence and implicated factors.” Clin Oral Investig., 13(2): 209-15. Jun 2009.
 
[5]  Stanley HR, White CL, McCray L. “The rate of tertiary (reparative) dentine formation in the human tooth.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 21(2):180-9. Feb 1966.
 
Show More References
6]  RobertsonA. “Pulp survival and hard tissue formation subsequent to dental trauma.A clinical and histological study of uncomplicated crown fractures and luxation injuries.” Swed Dent J Suppl. 125:1-65. 1997.
 
7]  Sayegh FS, Reed AJ. “Calcification in the dental pulp.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 25(6):873-82. Jun 1968.
 
8]  Näsström K, Forsberg B, Petersson A, Westesson PL. “Narrowing of the dental pulp chamber in patients with renal diseases.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 59(3):242-6. Mar1985.
 
9]  Pettiette MT, Zhong S, Moretti AJ, Khan AA. “Potential correlation between statins and pulp chamber calcification.” J Endod., 39(9): 1119-23. Sep2013.
 
10]  Richman RJ. “The use of ultrasonics in root canal therapy and root resection.” Med Dent J, 12: 12-8. 1957.
 
11]  Martin H. “Ultrasonic disinfection of the root canal.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 42(1):92-9. Jul1976.
 
12]  Martin H, Cunningham WT, Norris JP, Cotton WR. “Ultrasonic versus hand filing of dentin:a quantitative study.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 49(1):79-81. 1980.
 
13]  Martin H, Cunningham WT, Norris JP. “A quantitative comparison of the ability of diamond and K-type files to remove dentin.” Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol., 50(6):566-8. Dec, 1980.
 
14]  Martin H, Cunningham W. “Endosonicendodontics: the ultrasonic synergistic system.” Int Dent J., 34(3):198-203. Sep1984.
 
15]  Martin H, Cunningham W. “Endosonics--the ultrasonic synergistic system of endodontics.” Endod Dent Traumatol., 1(6):201-6. Dec, 1985.
 
16]  Hargreaves KM, Cohen S. Pathways of the pulp. Missouri, Mosby Elsevier, 2011, 136-222.
 
17]  Clark D. “The operating microscope and ultrasonics; a perfect marriage.” Dent Today., 23(6):74-6, 78-81. Jun2004.
 
18]  Buchanan LS. “Innovations in endodontic instruments and techniques: how they simplify treatment.” Dent Today., 21(12):52-4, 56-61. Dec2002.
 
19]  Paz E, Satovsky J, Moldauer I. “Comparison of the cutting efficiency of two ultrasonic units utilizing two different tips at two different power settings.” J Endod., 31(11): 824-6. Nov2005.
 
20]  Waplington M, Lumley PJ, Blunt L. “An in vitro investigation into the cutting action of ultrasonic radicular access preparation instruments.” Endod Dent Traumatol.16(4): 158-61. Aug2000.
 
21]  Plotino G, Pameijer CH, Grande NM, Somma F. “Ultrasonics in endodontics: a review of the literature.” J Endod., 33(2): 81-95. Feb2007.
 
22]  Buchanan LS. “Innovations in endodontic instruments and techniques: how they simplify treatment.” Dent Today., 21(12): 52-4, 56-61. Dec 2002.
 
Show Less References