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Article

Cognitive and Mental Changes in Patients with Brain Tumor after Surgery

1Department of Neuroscience, Functional Neurosurgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

2Institute for cognitive science studies (ICSS), Tehran, Iran

3Functional Neurosurgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

4Department of Neurology, Functional Neurosurgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran


Journal of Surgery. 2013, 1(3), 37-40
DOI: 10.12691/js-1-3-7
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Afsaneh Zarghi, Alireza Zali, Mehdi Tehranidost, Mohhamadreza Zarindast, Farzad Ashrafi. Cognitive and Mental Changes in Patients with Brain Tumor after Surgery. Journal of Surgery. 2013; 1(3):37-40. doi: 10.12691/js-1-3-7.

Correspondence to: Afsaneh  Zarghi, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Neurosurgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Email: a.zarghi@hotmail.com

Abstract

Introduction and objective: the patients with brain tumor are affected with cognitive and mental changes when undergo surgery and need treatment and rehabilitation. The objective of this study is evaluation of the surgery's effect on these impairments. Method and material: the presented cross-sectional study is done on 94 patients with brain tumor and MMSE, Beck depression, and anxiety tests were used for their cognitive and mental evaluation, before and after the surgery. Results: a significant difference were noticed in MMSE, Beck depression, and anxiety tests' scores, before and after the surgery (p<0.000). Conclusions: the surgery can lead into changes on patients' mental and cognitive status and there is a need on evaluation of these impairments before and after surgery, and in case of noticing the treatment and rehabilitation is needed in order to promote the life quality and survival.

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References

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Article

Limiting the Side Effects of Organ Preservation

1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran


Journal of Surgery. 2013, 1(3), 31-36
DOI: 10.12691/js-1-3-6
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
F. Talaei. Limiting the Side Effects of Organ Preservation. Journal of Surgery. 2013; 1(3):31-36. doi: 10.12691/js-1-3-6.

Correspondence to: F.  Talaei, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Email: Talaei@irimc.org

Abstract

The possibility of preserving organs outside the body at two different temperatures, known as cold and normothermic organ preservation has strengthened the potential of expanding donor list and better predicting the outcome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production seems to be a very important player in regulating the level of damage in both methods of preservation. The main side effect of cold organ preservation which is known to lead to ischemia reperfusion injury, is highly dependent on ROS production. Thus, warm preservation has recently come to attention. This method is an expensive, sophisticated method which needs large volumes of blood for perfusion of the extracted organ and does not fully inhibit side effects of organ preservation. Thus, implementation of the currently used preservation solutions with established benefits such as UW, with recently found molecules such as hydrogen sulfide or substances which either directly or indirectly increase the levels of this substance by activating cellular pathways such as transsulfuration, could increasingly limit the still damaging properties of preservation. This further prevents delayed organ function or organ rejection due to low organ viability after preservation while increasing organ availability. This simple approach would expand the organ preservation time and help to enhance organ quality for more successful organ transplantation.

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References

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Article

The Role of Technology in Skin Surgery

1Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, UK

2Department of Surgery, University Hospitals of Leicester


Journal of Surgery. 2013, 1(3), 25-30
DOI: 10.12691/js-1-3-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sreedhar K Krishna, Ankeet S Jethwa. The Role of Technology in Skin Surgery. Journal of Surgery. 2013; 1(3):25-30. doi: 10.12691/js-1-3-5.

Correspondence to: Sreedhar  K Krishna, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, UK. Email: sreedhar.krishna@imperial.ac.uk

Abstract

Skin surgery, or dermatological surgery is a relatively new specialty. Its infancy has meant that ideas are somewhat flexible and frequently taken up faster than in other more established fields of surgery. This mini-review examines the various roles of technology in each stage of surgery – pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative.

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Article

Giant Cell Tumour of the Femoral Neck: A Rare Site Managed by Curettage and Bone Grafting Only

1Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Bone and Joint Surgery, Barzalla, Srinagar, Kashmir, India


Journal of Surgery. 2013, 1(3), 22-24
DOI: 10.12691/js-1-3-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Omar Kirmani, Nasir Muzaffar, Mohammad Ehsan, Shamim Ahmad. Giant Cell Tumour of the Femoral Neck: A Rare Site Managed by Curettage and Bone Grafting Only. Journal of Surgery. 2013; 1(3):22-24. doi: 10.12691/js-1-3-4.

Correspondence to: Nasir  Muzaffar, Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Bone and Joint Surgery, Barzalla, Srinagar, Kashmir, India. Email: drnasir@in.com

Abstract

A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an osteolytic tumor occurring in young adults at the epiphysis or end of the long bone. This occurs after the epiphyseal plate has ossified and longitudinal bone growth is completed. Giant cell tumor is one of the most obscure and intensively examined tumours of bone. Its histogenesis is uncertain, the histology does not predict the clinical outcome and there are still many unanswered questions with regard to both its treatment and prognosis. Giant cell tumor of femoral head or neck is rarely seen in very few patients with accidental diagnosis. The disease affects activities of daily living (e.g. walking stair climbing and housekeeping) ultimately leading to a loss of functional independence. We present here an uncommon site for occurrence of the GCT in the femoral neck, and its subsequent management by joint preservation surgery employing simple curettage of the lesion and bone grafting with no relapse after two years of follow up.

Keywords

References

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Article

Migration of A K Wire in A Pediatric Floating Elbow Managed by Percutaneous Pinning-A Case Report

1Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Bone and Joint Surgery, Srinagar, Kashmir, India


Journal of Surgery. 2013, 1(3), 19-21
DOI: 10.12691/js-1-3-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Imtiaz Hussain Dar, Mohammad Moosa, Nasir Muzaffar. Migration of A K Wire in A Pediatric Floating Elbow Managed by Percutaneous Pinning-A Case Report. Journal of Surgery. 2013; 1(3):19-21. doi: 10.12691/js-1-3-3.

Correspondence to: Mohammad Moosa, Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Bone and Joint Surgery, Srinagar, Kashmir, India. Email: drnasir@in.com

Abstract

Simultaneous ipsilateral fracture of the elbow and forearm is an uncommon injury. In such injuries, the elbow is effectively dissociated from the rest of the limb. Hence this injury is also called ‘the floating elbow’. It is an indicator of a high energy injury and requires aggressive operative management. We present a unique case of a pediatric floating elbow in a nine year old boy. The supracondylar fracture was reduced under general anesthesia and fixed by percutaneous pinning with two crossed Kirshner (K) wires and the forearm fracture post reduction was managed conservatively by a Plaster of Paris long arm back slab. At 4 weeks post op, the slab was removed but only the lateral K wire could be visualized and removed. The child subsequently complained of pain in the upper arm and a prickly feeling in the skin. On examination, a sharp tip could be palpated in the upper arm and radiographs confirmed that the medial K wire had migrated into the upper arm. The K wire was removed under anesthesia and the patient started on range of motion exercises. He made an uneventful recovery with no residual side effects.

Keywords

References

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Article

Intestinal Tuberculosis Mimicking Colon Carcinoma

1Department of General Surgery, Sakarya University Faculty of Medicine, Sakarya, Turkey

2Department of General Surgery, Sakarya University Research and Educational Hospital, Sakarya, Turkey

3Department of Pathology, Sakarya University Research and Educational Hospital, Sakarya, Turkey


Journal of Surgery. 2013, 1(3), 15-18
DOI: 10.12691/js-1-3-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Fatih Altintoprak, Enis Dikicier, Guner Cakmak, Yusuf Arslan, Gokhan Akbulut, Osman Nuri Dilek, Zeynep Kahyaoglu. Intestinal Tuberculosis Mimicking Colon Carcinoma. Journal of Surgery. 2013; 1(3):15-18. doi: 10.12691/js-1-3-2.

Correspondence to: Fatih Altintoprak, Department of General Surgery, Sakarya University Faculty of Medicine, Sakarya, Turkey. Email: fatihaltintoprak@yahoo.com

Abstract

Gastrointestinal tuberculosis occurs most often in the ileocecal region, but it can also occur in other locations in the gastrointestinal system. However, few cases with isolated gastrointestinal involvement have been reported. A 27-year-old female presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, weakness, weight loss, and anorexia. A mass was identified in her right lower abdominal quadrant on physical examination. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a thickened right colon wall with marked narrowing of the lumen, and mucosal ulcers at the hepatic flexure and circular narrowing of the lumen 10cm distal to these lesions were identified on colonoscopic examination. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed due to the fact that malignancy could not be rule out. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis is often confused with inflammatory diseases, and even histopathological diagnosis is difficult in most cases. In addition to this, differentiation between malignancies and infectious diseases is also necessary.

Keywords

References

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Article

Intravenous Phenytoin: Potential New Therapy for Gastrointestinal Fistlae

1Surgery Department, KFMMC, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia


Journal of Surgery. 2013, 1(3), 11-14
DOI: 10.12691/js-1-3-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Saed A Jaber, Basma M Fallatah, Bader Tayara, Hassan Yami, Mahmoud Abdelmoeti. Intravenous Phenytoin: Potential New Therapy for Gastrointestinal Fistlae. Journal of Surgery. 2013; 1(3):11-14. doi: 10.12691/js-1-3-1.

Correspondence to: Saed A Jaber, Surgery Department, KFMMC, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Email: dr.jaber@gmx.com

Abstract

Gastrointestinal fistulae are among the most devastating complications of gastrointestinal surgery and can be lethal. Fistula tract healing consists of several processes, including cell migration and formation of a new extracellular matrix. Multiple studies have demonstrated that phenytoin can promote wound healing and induce faster fibrosis. We postulate that the positive effects of phenytoin can be used to enhance fibrosis of the fistula tract. We treated 16 patients who had developed GI fistulae as a complication of surgical intervention. Five patients developed external small intestinal fistulae, 3 patients developed colonic fistulae, 3 patients developed pancreatic fistulae, 1 patient developed a biliary fistula and 4 patients developed gastrocutaneous fistulae. Patients were started on IV phenytoin for the first 4 days and subsequently switched to oral phenytoin for a total of ten days. A significant drop in output was noticed 3-4 days after treatment. The fistulae healed in a short period averaging 8 days without the need for a surgical intervention in 13 patients (81%), but failed to heal in three patients. Conclusion: intravenous phenytoin may have a positive effect on the treatment of fistulae. Prospective studies are needed to validate this potential effect of phenytoin on fistula healing.

Keywords

References

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