World Journal of Preventive Medicine
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World Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2016, 4(1), 5-11
DOI: 10.12691/jpm-4-1-2
Open AccessArticle

Combined Orthodox and Traditional Medicine Use among Households in Orlu, Imo State, Nigeria: Prevalence and Determinants

Chukwuma B. Duru1, , Kevin C. Diwe1, Kenechi A. Uwakwe1, Chioma A. Duru2, Irene A. Merenu1, Anthony C. Iwu3, Uche R. Oluoha3 and Ikechi Ohanle3

1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imo State University Owerri, Imo State

2Superintendent Pharmacist, Rico pharmaceuticals, Onitsha, Anambra State

3Department of Community Medicine, Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu, Imo State

Pub. Date: March 09, 2016

Cite this paper:
Chukwuma B. Duru, Kevin C. Diwe, Kenechi A. Uwakwe, Chioma A. Duru, Irene A. Merenu, Anthony C. Iwu, Uche R. Oluoha and Ikechi Ohanle. Combined Orthodox and Traditional Medicine Use among Households in Orlu, Imo State, Nigeria: Prevalence and Determinants. World Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2016; 4(1):5-11. doi: 10.12691/jpm-4-1-2

Abstract

Introduction: Traditional Medicine is a widely and rapidly growing health system with economic importance. Globally, about 20-80 percent of the world’s population uses various forms of alternative medication and medicine. AIM: This study was carried out to assess the prevalence and socio-demographic determinants of combined orthodox and traditional medicine use among households in Imo State, Nigeria. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among 422 participants selected from households in communities from orlu, Imo State, using the multi stage random sampling. A semi-structured, pretested, interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect information from the participants and data was analyzed using EPI INFO version 7.1. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The prevalence of traditional medicine use and orthodox and traditional medicine combination was 77.5% and 63.7% respectively. Most, (86.3%) of the participants preferred orthodox medicine over traditional medicine and their commonest reason for preference is that it was more effective, (68.2%). Socio-demographic and household characteristics that significantly influenced combined utilization of both when sick were; age, sex, marital status, educational status, occupation, household size, family size, death of an under-five in the last one year, and the cause of death of the under-five, (p=<0.05). Conclusion: Our study revealed high use of both traditional medicine and the combination of both. There is need to increase awareness especially to the target groups on the likely dangers associated with combined use of orthodox and traditional medicine.

Keywords:
socio-demographic and household determinants traditional and orthodox medicine Nigeria

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