Journal of Physical Activity Research
ISSN (Print): 2574-4437 ISSN (Online): 2574-4437 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jpar Editor-in-chief: Peter Hart
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Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2016, 1(1), 15-19
DOI: 10.12691/jpar-1-1-4
Open AccessArticle

Short-term Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Physical Fitness Measures in Moderately Active College-aged Females: A Randomized Placebo-controlled Pilot Study

Gabriel A. Benavidez1, , Nickie Detomasi1 and Peter D. Hart1, 2

1Health Promotion Program, Montana State University - Northern, Havre, MT 59501, USA

2Research and Statistical Consultant, Health Demographics, Havre, MT

Pub. Date: August 08, 2016

Cite this paper:
Gabriel A. Benavidez, Nickie Detomasi and Peter D. Hart. Short-term Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Physical Fitness Measures in Moderately Active College-aged Females: A Randomized Placebo-controlled Pilot Study. Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2016; 1(1):15-19. doi: 10.12691/jpar-1-1-4

Abstract

Supplementation of oral creatine is a popular practice among strength and power athletes. Little evidence exists, however, on creatine’s short-term performance effects in college-aged females. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of short-term creatine supplementation on physical fitness measures of muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition in college aged females. A double-blinded randomized placebo controlled trial was used with n=10 college-aged females assigned to either creatine (n=5) or placebo (n=5) groups. Subjects underwent a 2-week resistance training program with treatments administered during week 2. Fitness measurements were taken at baseline, week 1 (pre-supplementation), and week 2 (post-supplementation). Significant group-by-trial interactions were seen for percent body fat (PBF), 1RM leg press (LP), 1RM bench press (BP), wall sit (WS), push-up (PU), plank, and vertical jump scores, with the creatine group exhibiting significantly (p’s<.05) greater improvement over control group on all measures. Results of this study show that short-term creatine supplementation may produce positive effects on physical fitness measures while taken during a resistance training program.

Keywords:
creatine muscular strength endurance body composition randomized placebo-controlled trial

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