Journal of Physical Activity Research
ISSN (Print): 2574-4437 ISSN (Online): 2574-4437 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jpar Editor-in-chief: Peter Hart
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Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2019, 4(2), 118-125
DOI: 10.12691/jpar-4-2-7
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Achieving the Physical Activity Guidelines during the Wintertime While Engaging in MyWinter and MyWinterHoliday Activity

M. Felicia Cavallini1, and David J. Dyck2

1Limestone College, Gaffney, South Carolina, USA

2University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Pub. Date: August 21, 2019

Cite this paper:
M. Felicia Cavallini and David J. Dyck. Achieving the Physical Activity Guidelines during the Wintertime While Engaging in MyWinter and MyWinterHoliday Activity. Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2019; 4(2):118-125. doi: 10.12691/jpar-4-2-7

Abstract

Despite decades of research on the benefits of physical activity (PA) and exercise, many Americans and Canadians still do not engage in the recommended levels of PA. Only 15% of Canadian adults obtain the recommended 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per week according to the Canadian Health Measures Survey. The purpose of this study was to examine adults’ physical barriers to PA and exercise to ultimately improve PA participation. In phase I, facilitated focus group discussions were conducted with 234 adults from 13 diverse groups in Guelph, Ontario, Canada regarding their physical barriers to PA and exercise. Among the physical barrier questions asked were: i) is winter weather a hindrance to engaging in PA?; ii) are you less likely to feel motivated to partake in PA in cold weather? Using the transcriptions from phase I, a survey was designed and administered to participants of the same community groups in phase II of the study to quantify feedback. Questionnaire responses were provided by 277 adults. Winter weather was the only significant physical barrier from the all respondents group, particularly among females. Recommendations for overcoming the barriers that contribute to low participation in PA in cold weather are discussed. To help incorporate a culture and environment of being active during the winter months, promotional and marketing strategies are identified through the introduction of MyWinter and MyWinterHoliday Activity graphics. Incorporating realistic, doable and even enjoyable daily indoor and outdoor PA strategies during winter are advocated.

Keywords:
physical activity barriers winter weather intervention strategies lifestyle physical activity Canadian

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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