World Journal of Nutrition and Health
ISSN (Print): 2379-7819 ISSN (Online): 2379-7827 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jnh Editor-in-chief: Srinivas NAMMI
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World Journal of Nutrition and Health. 2020, 8(1), 22-27
DOI: 10.12691/jnh-8-1-5
Open AccessArticle

Effect of Peanut Consumption on Nutritional Status Indices of HIV Infected Adults in Nyeri County, Kenya

Regina Kamuhu1, Beatrice Mugendi2, Judith Kimiywe1 and Eliud Njagi3,

1Food, Nutrition & Dietetics Department, Kenyatta University, P.O BOX 43844-00100, Nairobi, Kenya

2Food and Nutrition Department, Murang’a University of Technology, P.O Box 75-10200, Murang’a, Kenya

3Biochemistry and Biotechnology Department, Kenyatta University, P.O BOX 43844-00100, Nairobi, Kenya

Pub. Date: December 14, 2020

Cite this paper:
Regina Kamuhu, Beatrice Mugendi, Judith Kimiywe and Eliud Njagi. Effect of Peanut Consumption on Nutritional Status Indices of HIV Infected Adults in Nyeri County, Kenya. World Journal of Nutrition and Health. 2020; 8(1):22-27. doi: 10.12691/jnh-8-1-5

Abstract

Introduction and objectives; Peanuts are a rich source of magnesium, folate, fibre, α-tocopherol, copper, arginine and resveratrol. These compounds have been shown to reduce the CVD risk in various ways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of peanut supplementation on nutrition status of HIV-infected adults attending comprehensive care clinic in Nyeri Level- 5- Hospital. Methodology; The study design was a randomized cross-over trial. The eligible participants were randomly assigned to a two arm study. In treatment I, the participants consumed their regular diet supplemented with 80gms of peanuts; while in treatment II, the participants were counseled on healthy diet and supplemented it with 80gms of peanut. The participants then crossed over to respective treatments. Each treatment took 8 weeks, with a six weeks washout period between treatments. A paired T- test was used to compare subject differences in markers at baseline and at the end of each treatment. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the effect of peanut supplementation on nutrition status. Results; Peanut supplementation significantly increased intake of total fat while carbohydrate intake decreased significantly (p < 0.05). There was no significant change in weight, BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, body fat, body muscle, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and fasting blood glucose. There was a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in total cholesterol, triglycerides and Low density lipoprotein in both treatments while High density lipoprotein increased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion; Regular supplementation of a healthy diet with 80gms of peanut may improve the lipid profile without affecting the body weight status.

Keywords:
peanut consumption weight blood glucose lipid profile and blood pressure nutrition status indices

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