Journal of Food and Nutrition Research
ISSN (Print): 2333-1119 ISSN (Online): 2333-1240 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jfnr Editor-in-chief: Prabhat Kumar Mandal
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Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2018, 6(4), 256-260
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-6-4-8
Open AccessArticle

Antioxidant and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity of Scarlet Runner Bean Polyphenols

Zhaohong Ci1, 2 and Michiyuki Kojima2, 3,

1Department of Food Production Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, 11, Nishi-2-sen, Inada-machi, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan

2United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Iwate University, 3-18-8, Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8550, Japan

3Department of Human Sciences, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, 11, Nishi-2-sen, Inada-machi, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan

Pub. Date: May 03, 2018

Cite this paper:
Zhaohong Ci and Michiyuki Kojima. Antioxidant and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity of Scarlet Runner Bean Polyphenols. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2018; 6(4):256-260. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-6-4-8

Abstract

Scarlet runner beans (SRB) are a valuable source of many nutrients, including proteins, starch, dietary fiber, and oligosaccharides, and are used in various foods in Japan. To extend our knowledge of the effects of SRB on human health, we analyzed the color, polyphenol and procyanidin contents, DPPH radical scavenging activity, and reducing power of various SRB. The L* and C values were highest for SRB (white) and lowest for SRB (black). SRB (purple) and SRB (brown) showed higher polyphenol and procyanidin contents than those of SRB (white) and SRB (mixed). SRB (brown) and SRB (mixed) showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity and reducing power. SRB (white) had the lowest ratio of oligomeric and polymeric polyphenols and the lowest DPPH radical scavenging activity and reducing power. We found a positive correlation between polyphenol content and both DPPH radical scavenging activity and reducing power. Moreover, polyphenols from SRB inhibited the activity of α-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. The polyphenols (50 µg/mL) of SRB (black) showed the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (85.7%), and those of SRB (white) showed the lowest inhibitory activity (53.8%). SRB (black) had a lower IC50 value (26.4 µg/mL) and SRB (white) had a higher IC50 value (58.4 µg/mL) than those of other SRB. We speculate that the degree of polymerization for polyphenols affects antioxidant activity and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity for SRB. These results suggest that SRB has antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory effects via its polyphenols and provide a basis for selecting SRB cultivars and for developing SRB-based functional foods with improved health benefits.

Keywords:
scarlet runner bean polyphenol DPPH radical scavenging activity reducing power α-glucosidase inhibitory activity

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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