Journal of Food and Nutrition Research
ISSN (Print): 2333-1119 ISSN (Online): 2333-1240 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jfnr Editor-in-chief: Prabhat Kumar Mandal
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Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015, 3(9), 570-574
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-3-9-2
Open AccessArticle

The Influence of Iron-deficiency Anemia during the Pregnancy on Preterm Birth and Birth Weight in South China

LingLing Huang1, Gowreesunkur Purvarshi1, , SuMei Wang1, LinLin Zhong1 and Hui Tang1

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of GuangXi Medical University, Nanning, GuangXi, China

Pub. Date: November 11, 2015

Cite this paper:
LingLing Huang, Gowreesunkur Purvarshi, SuMei Wang, LinLin Zhong and Hui Tang. The Influence of Iron-deficiency Anemia during the Pregnancy on Preterm Birth and Birth Weight in South China. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2015; 3(9):570-574. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-3-9-2

Abstract

Objective: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is very common during pregnancy and it has adverse effects on pregnancy. However, current researches on IDA and adverse pregnancy outcomes have shown inconsistency. The aim of this observational study is to assess in which trimester of pregnancy, IDA carries a greater risk of low birth weight (LBW) infants and preterm birth. Methods: A prospective cohort study was carried out at obstetric department of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University from January 2014 to December 2014. Venous blood samples of 500 pregnant mothers were collected in first, second and third trimester of pregnancy. Hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels in each trimester of pregnancy were recorded. The mothers were followed till delivery. Gestational weeks at the time of delivery and birth weight of babies were recorded. Results: Our data showed that during pregnancy, more than 70% of pregnant women suffered iron-deficiency anemia. Compared to the non-IDA group, serum ferritin level was significantly low in second and late trimester of the pregnancy in IDA group (p <0.05). Pregnant women who were anemic during the pregnancy were less literate, multigravida, multipara (p <0.05). According to the logistic regression analysis, Anemia in late trimester was the affected factors to the incidence of low birth weight and preterm birth (p <0.05) A positive correlation (r= 0.97,p<0.05) between Hb level and birth weight was seen only in late trimester anemic patients. Conclusions: The incidence of preterm deliveries and low birth weight babies were significantly more in mothers who were anemic in the third trimesters of pregnancy. Hemoglobin screening in second trimester is necessary for pregnant women along with correcting the anemia from the second trimester to improve the maternal outcome. Most effective education programs should be performed to the anemic group during pregnancy.

Keywords:
IDA ferritin preterm birth birth weight iron therapy

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