Journal of Food and Nutrition Research
ISSN (Print): 2333-1119 ISSN (Online): 2333-1240 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jfnr Editor-in-chief: Prabhat Kumar Mandal
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Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2013, 1(6), 164-173
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-1-6-8
Open AccessArticle

Concurrent Accumulation of Myricetin and Gallic Acid Putatively Responsible for the Umami Taste of a Specialized Old Oolong Tea

Feng-Yin Li1, Wei-Hung Yang2, 3, Chi-I Chang4, Sin-Jie Lee2, Chih-Chien Hung1, Ying-Jie Chen2, Tzyy-Rong Jinn5, and Jason T.C. Tzen1, 6,

1Department of Chemistry, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C

2Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C

3Taichung Hospital Department of Health, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C

4Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan, R.O.C

5School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C

6School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C;Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C

Pub. Date: December 15, 2013

Cite this paper:
Feng-Yin Li, Wei-Hung Yang, Chi-I Chang, Sin-Jie Lee, Chih-Chien Hung, Ying-Jie Chen, Tzyy-Rong Jinn and Jason T.C. Tzen. Concurrent Accumulation of Myricetin and Gallic Acid Putatively Responsible for the Umami Taste of a Specialized Old Oolong Tea. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2013; 1(6):164-173. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-1-6-8

Abstract

Strong umami taste was perceived in a specialized old oolong tea reproducibly converted from a fresh oolong tea by fierce baking biannually for five years. Phenolic compounds in this umami tea and those in an initial fresh oolong tea were analyzed and compared. The results implied that the abundant catechin derivatives and flavonol glycosides were significantly reduced while three compounds were evidently accumulated after the tea conversion. These three compounds were chemically identified as gallic acid and two correlated flavonols, myricetin and quercetin. Molecular modeling suggested that myricetin and gallic acid might serve as ligand and enhancer to activate the umami receptor synergistically. Binary docking of myricetin and gallic acid induced the gate closure of the binding cavity in the umami receptor, in a manner similar to that of glutamate and its enhancer, inosine 5′-monophosphate. Regardless the induced fitness, the detailed molecular interactions between these two sets of binary components and the receptor were drastically different. In this binary docking modeling for umami taste, myricetin could not be equivalently replaced with any of the major tea phenolic compounds.

Keywords:
gallic acid myricetin old oolong tea quercetin umami

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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